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Books

Bajada, C., Melatos, Karlan & Morduch 2017, Principles of Economics (1st edition), McGraw-Hill, Australia.

Berti, M. 2017, Elgar Introduction to Organizational Discourse Analysis, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, UK.
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Our knowledge and understanding of organizations is both enabled and constrained by invisible relationship of power that are embedded in the ways in which we act and speak. The notion of discourse has been used by many authors to describe and study these phenomena, and this volume offers a succinct but comprehensive introduction to the vast field of critical organizational discourse analysis. Targeted at graduate and doctoral students, and at non-specialist academic who need to familiarize with the academic debate on the subject, the book harnesses the power of metaphors to describe the many faces of discourse.

Clarke, T. 2017, Corporate Governance: Cycles of Crisis and Regulation, Sage, Los Angeles.

Clarke, T. 2017, Innovation in the Asia Pacific: From Manufacturing to Knowledge Economies, Springer, Singapore.

Clarke, T. 2017, Oxford Handbook of the Corporation, Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Clarke, T. & Klettner, A. 2017, The Global Financial Crisis and Regulatory Response: A Concise Guide, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Clegg, S.R., Schweitzer, J., Whittle, A. & Pitelis, C. 2017, Strategy: Theory and Practice, 2nd, Sage Publishing, London.
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Updated to bring the material in line with the topical and contemporary ideas and debates on or about strategy and catering to students and their diverse learning styles, the second edition is an easy to use tool allowing students to switch from web resources to the print text and back again, opening windows on the world of strategy through cases that are vibrant and engaged, digital links that allow them to explore topics in more detail and video and other media that encourage relating theory to practice. Providing a fresh perspective on strategy from an organizational perspective through a discursive approach featuring key theoretic tenets, this text is also pragmatic and emphasizes the practices of strategy to encourage the reader to be open to a wider set of ideas, with a little more relevance, and with a cooler attitude towards the affordances of the digital world and the possibilities for strategy’s futures. The key areas of Strategy take a critical stance in the new edition, and also include areas less evident in conventional strategy texts such as not-for-profit organizations, process theories, globalization, organizational politics and decision-making as well as the futures of strategy. The new edition comes packed with features that encourage readers to engage and relate theory to practice and is complimented by a free Interactive e-book* featuring videos, cases and other relevant links, allowing access on the go and encouraging learning and retention whatever the reading or learning style. Suitable as core reading for undergraduate and postgraduate business management students of strategy and strategic management.

Darcy, S., Frawley, S. & Adair, D. 2017, Managing the Paralympics, 1, Palgrave Macmillan, London.
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Flyvbjerg, B. 2017, The Oxford Handbook of Megaproject Management, Oxford University Press.
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The Oxford Handbook of Megaproject Management provides state-of-the-art scholarship in the emerging field of megaproject management.

Frawley, S. 2017, Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge.
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What is lacking, however, is a book which identifies and evaluates the current issues and complexities faced by those charged with the responsibility of managing these mega-sport events. This book fills the gap.

Kenny, S., Taylor, M., Onyx, J.A. & Mayo, M. 2017, Challenging the Third Sector: Global prospects for active citizenship.
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Klettner, A. 2017, Corporate Governance Regulation The changing roles and responsibilities of boards of directors, Routledge, UK.
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Corporate governance regulation has been through numerous cycles of reform, and yet we still see instances of companies collapsing suddenly. Codes of corporate governance have been implemented in most developed countries, recommending detailed governance frameworks for publicly listed companies and their boards, but our understanding of how these codes influence behaviour is still limited. In this book, Alice Klettner draws on the domains of law and business to explore the effectiveness of corporate governance codes. Using interview evidence from company directors and officers, as well as published evidence of companies’ corporate governance systems, she discusses the theory and practice of corporate governance and its regulation – with a focus on how corporate governance codes can affect board behaviour and company performance. This interdisciplinary book will be valuable reading for advanced students and researchers of corporate governance, and will also be directly relevant to governance practitioners and policymakers.

Ross, S.A., Trayler, R., Van de Venter, T.W., Bird, R., Westerfield, R.W. & Jordan, B.D. 2017, Essentials of Corporate Finance, 4th, McGraw Hill, Sydney, Australia.

Rowley, C. 2017, The Changing Face of Corruption in the Asia-Pacific: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges, First, Elsevier, Amsterdam and Oxford.
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The Changing Face of Corruption in the Asia Pacific: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges is a contemporary analysis of corruption in the Asia-Pacific region. Bringing academicians and practitioners together, contributors to this book discuss the current perspectives of corruption’s challenges in both theory and practice, and what the future challenges will be in addressing corruption’s proliferation in the region.

Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. 2017, Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon.
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Critical Issues in Global Sport Management will provide researchers, students and practitioners with a collection of chapters that examine the latest concepts and challenges faced by the global sport industry. The book identifies and evaluates current issues and complexities faced by those charged with the responsibility of managing sport in compound business contexts as well as intricate social environments.

Schwabenland, C., Lange, C., Nakagawa, S. & Onyx, J.A. 2017, Emancipating Women: The Role of Civil Society, Policy Press, University of Bristol.
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Women are at the heart of civil society organisations. Through them they have achieved many successes, challenged oppressive practices at a local and global level and have developed outstanding entrepreneurial activities. Yet Civil Service Organisation (CSO) research tends to ignore considerations of gender and the rich history of activist feminist organisations is rarely examined. This collection examines the nexus between the emancipation of women, and their role(s) in these organisations. Featuring contrasting studies from a wide range of contributors from different parts of the world, it covers emerging issues such as the role of social media in organising, the significance of religion in many cultural contexts, activism in Eastern Europe and the impact of environmental degradation on women’s lives. Asking whether involvement in CSOs offers a potential source of emancipation for women or maintains the status quo, this anthology will also have an impact on policy and practice in relation to equal opportunities. - See more at: https://policypress.co.uk/womens-emancipation-and-civil-society-organisations#sthash.VYLMtUOk.dpuf

Chapters

Adair, D. 2017, 'Anti-doping for Paralympians' in Darcy, S., Frawley, S. & Adair, D. (eds), Managing the Paralympics, Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 131-152.
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This book critically examines the planning, management, and operations of the world’s premier event for Para sport athletes.

Adriaanse, J.A. 2017, 'Gender diversity in the governance of international sport federations' in Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. (eds), Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 23-37.
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Adriaanse, J.A., Cobourn, S. & Frawley, S. 2017, 'Governance, CSR and diversity: a critical field of study in global sport management' in Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. (eds), Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 9-22.
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Bajada, C. 2017, 'Money Laundering Activities in Australia – An examination of the push and pull factors driving money flows.' in Rowley, C. & Rama, M. (eds), The Changing Face of Corruption in the Asia Pacific, Elsevier, UK.

Bajada, C. 2017, 'Money Laundering Activities in Australia – An examination of the push and pull factors driving money flows.' in Rowley, C. & dela Rama, M. (eds), The Growing Face of Corruption in the Asia Pacific, Elsevier.

Baker, R., Danylchuk, K., Gillentine, A., Jonson, P., Pitts, B. & Zhang, J. 2017, 'Internationalized sport management education: bridging the gaps' in Pitts, B. & Zhang, J. (eds), Global sport management: contemporary issues and inquiries, Routledge, New York, pp. 18-37.

Benn, S.H. 2017, 'Drivers of Change' in Alas, G. & Ingley, C. (eds), Corporate Behaviour and Sustainability, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 173-195.
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Clarke, T. & Gholamshahi, S. 2017, 'Corporate Governance and Inequality: The Impact of Financialisation and Shareholder Value' in Karyotis, C. & Alijani, S. (eds), Finance and Economy for Society: Integrating Sustainability, Emerald, Bingley, UK, pp. 27-55.
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Abstract Purpose The purpose of this chapter is to analyse how in recent years the rediscovery that extreme inequality is returning to advanced economies and has become widespread. What is at issue are the causes of this inequality. It is becoming clear that the wider population, particularly in Anglo-American economies have not shared in the growing wealth of the countries concerned, and that the majority of this wealth is being transferred on a continuous and systemic basis to the very rich. Corporate governance and the pursuit of shareholder value it is argued has become a major driver of inequality. Methodology/approach The current statistical evidence produced by leading authorities including the US Federal Reserve, World Economic Forum, Credit Suisse and Oxfam are examined. The policy of shareholder value and the mechanisms by which the distributions from business take place are investigated from a critical perspective. Findings While the Anglo-American economies are seeing a return to the extremes of inequality last witnessed in the 19th century, the causes of this inequality are changing. In the 19th century great fortunes often were inherited, or derived by entrepreneurs from the ownership and control of productive assets. By the late 20th century as Atkinson, Piketty and Saez (2011) and others have highlighted, the sustained and rapid inflation in top income shares have made a significant contribution to the accelerating rate of income and wealth inequality. Research implications The intensification of inequality in advanced industrial economies, despite the consistent work of Atkinson and others, was largely neglected until the recent research of Picketty which has attracted international attention. It is now acknowledged widely that inequality is a serious issue; however, the contemporary causes of inequality remain largely unexplored. Practical/social implications The significance of inequality, now that it is recognized, demands policy and pract...

Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Ideal type' in George Ritzer (ed), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 2201-2202.

Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'The East India Company: The First Modern Multinational?In Dörrenbächer, C. and Geppert, M. (Eds) Multinational Corporations And Organization Theory: Post Millenium Perspectives' in In Dörrenbächer, C. and Geppert, M. (Eds) Multinational Corporations And Organization Theory: Post Millenium Perspectives, Bingley, Emerald.

Clegg, S.R. & Cunha, M.P. 2017, 'Organizational dialectics' in Organizational dialectics, in Langley, A. (ed.) Oxford Handbook of Organizational Paradox., Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Clegg, S.R., Sankaran, S., Biesenthal, C. & Pollack, J. 2017, 'Power and sensemaking in megaprojects' in Flyvbjerg, B. (ed), The Oxford Handbook of Megaproject Management, Oxford University Press.
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Cotton, D.J. & Buzevska, M. 2017, 'Trading under uncertainty: An investigation of the Australian emissions market' in Lehner, O.M. (ed), Routledge Handbook of Social and Sustainable Finance, Taylor and Fracis, London, UK, pp. 571-586.

Cotton, D.J. & Buzevska, M. 2017, 'Trading under uncertainty: An investigation of the Australian emissions market' in Routledge Handbook of Social and Sustainable Finance, Taylor and Francis, London, UK, pp. 571-586.
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Darcy, S., Adair, D. & Frawley, S. 2017, 'Paralympic Paradigm: A Research Agenda' in Managing the Paralympics, Palgrave Macmillan, London, pp. 287-293.
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Darcy, S., Frawley, S.M. & Adair 2017, 'The Paralympic Games: Managerial and StrategicDirections' in Managing the Paralympics, The Campus, 4 Crinan Street, London, N1 9XW, United Kingdom, pp. 1-20.
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Darcy, S.A. 2017, 'Accessibility as a Key Management Component of the Paralympics', The Campus, 4 Crinan Street, London, N1 9XW, United Kingdom, pp. 47-90.
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Darcy, S.A. & Almond, B. 2017, 'Case study: Sydney’s 'Cultural Ribbon' (Australia)' in Aragall, F., Neumann, P. & Sagramola, S. (eds), Design for All in Tourist Destinations ECA 2017, EuCAN – European Concept for Accessibility Network, pp. 78-83.
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Darcy, S.A. & Almond, B. 2017, 'Case study: Sydney’s 'Cultural Ribbon' (Australia)' in Aragall, F., Neumann, P. & Sagramola, S. (eds), Design for All in Tourist Destinations ECA 2017, EuCAN – European Concept for Accessibility Network, pp. 78-83.
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dela Rama, M.J. 2017, 'Corruption, corporate governance and building institutions in the Asia-Pacific' in Rowley, C. & dela Rama, M.J. (eds), The Changing Face of Corruption in the Asia Pacific: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges, Elsevier, Amsterdam and Oxford, pp. 93-108.
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This chapter looks at how good corporate governance and building robust, strong institutions can help address issues of corruption in the Asia-Pacific. Firstly, this chapter looks at the definitions of corruption, its unpredictability and different forms of petty and grand corruption after the Rose-Ackerman (2008) model. Corruption’s long-lasting effects on poverty are also mentioned. This chapter suggests that corporate governance institutions and their good practice may alleviate the effects of corruption. Corporate governance reforms are described and suggestions are made on how their good practice may strengthen government institutions and promote business investment in countries with weak markets. Finally, this chapter states that institutional building is an important part of combating corruption, preventing politicisation in the organs of government and promoting socio-economic well-being in the region.

dela Rama, M.J. & Rowley, C. 2017, 'Future directions for research into corruption and anti-corruption practice' in dela Rama, M.J. & Rowley, C. (eds), The Changing Face of Corruption in the Asia Pacific: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges, Elsevier, Amsterdam and Oxford, pp. 369-378.
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This concluding chapter summarises the main concerns and issues that the contributors in this book have raised, and provides some directions for future research into corruption and anti-corruption practice.

dela Rama, M.J. & Rowley, C. 2017, 'The Changing Face of Corruption in the Asia Pacific Region: Its Discontents, Current Perspectives and Future Challenges' in Rowley, C. (ed), The Changing Face of Corruption in the Asia Pacific: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges, Elsevier, Amsterdam and Oxford, pp. 1-20.
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This book brings together a diverse group of academicians, practitioners and contributors and their knowledge of, and/or experience of, corruption in the Asia Pacific Region. Hand in hand, the theoreticians inform, while the practitioners enlighten. This complementary group and their collective wisdom demonstrate the ills and ramifications of corruption and how breathtaking it is in its depth. They note the different changes that have occurred in the region from the latter half of the 20th century to the early decades of the 21st century as it emerged an economic powerhouse: the ‘Asian Century’ is here.

Fee, A. 2017, 'Expatriates in Aidland: Humanitarian Aid & Development Workers and Volunteers' in McNulty, Y. & Selmer, J. (eds), Research Handbook of Expatriates, Edward Elgar.
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This chapter addresses a group of expatriates often overlooked by business and management researchers, but who comprise a large and growing proportion of the globally mobile workforce. These are expatriates working in humanitarian aid and development cooperation (international aid and development, or IAD). As this chapter makes clear, the sector is far from homogenous and defies easy categorisation. Notwithstanding this, the umbrella term ‘Aidland’ of the chapter’s title is a metaphorical construct coined by a social anthropologist to describe the virtual, cultural and geographic spaces that exist in the provision of aid and development; for expatriates, this is often a third cultural space separate from their home and host cultures, with established vernacular, mores, artefacts and discourses that are distinct and often a source of shared identity to its inhabitants. The chapter contains five sections. First, I demystify some of the bewildering terminology, concepts and actors that populate the sector. Following this, the operating context of Aidland is canvassed, focusing on features that make the expatriate experience distinctive. Next, an overview of the research base that has examined expatriates in this sector is presented and discussed. It combines literature from within aid and development with literature from the business and management sphere. This is followed by a discussion of future research possibilities, and concluding thoughts.

Fee, A. 2017, 'Expatriates’ Safety and Security During Crisis' in McNulty, Y. & Selmer, J. (eds), Research Handbook of Expatriates, Edward Elgar.
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Frawley, S.M. 2017, 'Broadcasting Sport Mega-Events' in Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge, London, pp. 89-104.
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Frawley, S.M. 2017, 'Leading the Team: The Role of the Chef de Mission atthe Paralympic Games' in Managing the Paralympics, Palgrave Macmillan, London, pp. 173-190.
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Frawley, S.M. 2017, 'Sponsorship and Sport Mega-Events' in Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge, London, pp. 105-120.
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Frawley, S.M. 2017, 'Sport mega-events: managerial dimensions' in Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge, London, pp. 1-7.
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Hinings, C.R., Logue, D.M. & Zietsma, C. 2017, 'Fields, Institutional Infrastructure and Governance' in Greenwood, R., Meyer, R., Lawrence, T. & Oliver, C. (eds), The Sage Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism, Sage, UK.

Klettner, A.L. 2017, 'Governing corporate responsibility: the role of soft regulation' in Aras, G. & Ingley, C. (eds), Corporate Behavior and Sustainability: Doing well by being good, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 83-102.
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Liu, H. 2017, 'Redeeming difference in CMS through anti-racist feminisms' in Pullen, A., Phillips, M. & Harding, N. (eds), Feminists and Queer Theorists Debate the Future of CMS, Emerald Publishing Group, Bingley, pp. 39-56.
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I propose in this chapter that the dominant practice of critical management studies (CMS) is characterised by white masculinity, where theorising tends to assume a white universal norm while commodifying difference. This approach treats diversity as something CMS has, rather than is. In order to disrupt the prevailing practice, I explore how anti-racist feminisms (a term I use here to refer to the diverse movements of postcolonial feminism and feminisms of colour) may shape CMS towards a more reflexive and meaningful engagement with difference. In reflecting on my own performance of white masculinity as an aspiring critical management scholar, I suggest that an anti-racist feminist approach bears the potential to challenge relations of domination within CMS and reinvigorate our pursuits for emancipation. It is my hope that the anti-racist feminist perspective advanced in this chapter may offer an opportunity for critical management scholars to ‘do’ critique differently through a radical inclusion of previously marginalised perspectives.

Onyx, J.A. 2017, 'Community development and governance: An Australian example' in Kenny, B., McGrath, B. & Phillips, R. (eds), The Routledge Handbook of Community Development, Routledge, New York.

Ratten, V., Rammal, H.G. & Ramadani, V. 2017, 'Islamic Finance: An Entrepreneurial Management Perspective' in Ramadani, V., Dana, L.-.P., Gërguri-Rashiti, S. & Ratten, V. (eds), Entrepreneurship and Management in an Islamic Context, Springer International Publishing, pp. 119-132.
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Increasing attention has been placed on the Islamic finance sector because of its entrepreneurial approach to money management. The aim of this chapter is to focus on the entrepreneurial management approaches to Islamic finance by looking at the global money market. The innovative financial management practices used by Islamic businesses are discussed in terms of religious entrepreneurship. The findings suggest that Islamic finance is more entrepreneurial than other cultural forms of money exchange. Suggestions for future research are stated that integrate an Islamic management approach to finance based practices.

Rodrigues, F.R., Cunha, M.P., Rego, A. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'The Seven Pillars of Paradoxical Organizational Wisdom: On the use Of Paradox as a Vehicle to Synthesize Knowledgeand Ignorancein W. Kupers & O. Gunnlaugson (Eds.), Wisdom learning: Perspectives on wising-up management education' in Wisdom learning: Perspectives on wising-up business and management education, Routledge.

Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. 2017, 'Critical Issues in Global Sport' in Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 1-6.
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In this introductory chapter, we provide the background, purpose and context for Critical Issues in Global Sport Management. In the remaining 19 chapters of this book we invite readers to explore, learn, discuss and reflect on the latest concepts, issues and trends in managing sport.

Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. 2017, 'Current trends and future research challenges in global sport management' in Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 278-285.
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In this final chapter of Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, we as editors reflect on a number of the key debates highlighted in the book. Moreover, with the use of practical examples, we critically discuss how current issues, challenges, and emerging trends in global sport are likely to develop in the future.

Schulenkorf, N., Schlenker, K. & Thomson, A. 2017, 'Event Leverage and Sport Mega-Events' in Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 139-149.
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In this chapter we will illustrate the significance of sport event leverage in the context of large-scale and sport mega-events. We first introduce the different areas of event leverage, and then discuss the specific strategies and tactics related to the concept. We provide case studies to illustrate sport event leverage in practice, and highlight challenges and limitations.

Schulenkorf, N., Sherry, E. & Rowe, K. 2017, 'Global sport-for-development' in Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, pp. 176-191.
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In this chapter, we aim to familiarise students with sport-for-development (SFD) by providing a review of the SFD literature. We base this chapter on a recently conducted integrated literature review that synthesised all SFD research studies published between 2000 and 2014 (see Schulenkorf, Sherry and Rowe, 2016). In particular, we present the status quo of SFD activity in relation to the research foci, authorship, journal outlets, dates of publication, geographical contexts, thematic areas, sport activities, and research methodologies. Based on this review, we will reflect on the implications of SFD as an emerging area of research and provide recommendations for future work in the field.

Schweitzer, J. 2017, 'Network capitalism and the role of strategy, contracts and performance expectations for Asia-Pacific innovation partnerships' in Clarke, T. (ed), Innovation in the Asia Pacific: From Manufacturing to Knowledge Economies, Springer.

Shearer, C., Clegg, S.R. & Johnstone, J. 2017, 'The Impact of Contemporary Management Ideas: their influence on the Constitution of Public Sector Management Work' in Mitev, N., Morgan-Thomas, A., Lorrino, P., Dde Vaujany, F. & Nama, Y. (eds), Materiality and Managerial Techniques, Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Small, J. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Expanding Understanding: Using the “Choraster” to Provide a Voice for the Female Traveler' in Khoo-Lattimore, C. & Wilson, E. (eds), Women and Travel: Trends, Journeys and Experiences, Apple Academic Press, New Jersey.

Taylor, T.L. 2017, 'Human Resource Management' in Hoye, R. & Parent, M. (eds), The Sage Handbook of Sport Management, SAGE, United Kingdom, pp. 62-84.
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Taylor, T.L. & Morgan, A. 2017, 'Managing volunteers in grassroots sport' in Bradbury, T. & O'Boyle, I. (eds), Understanding Sport Management International Perspectives, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 130-144.
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Thomson, A., Schlenker, K., Schulenkorf, N. & Brooking, E. 2017, 'The Social and Environmental Consequences of Hosting Mega-Sport Events' in Frawley, S. (ed), Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 150-164.
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The social and environmental consequences of sport mega-events have become increasingly important when trying to understand the benefits and costs of hosting such events for cities and their residents. Thus, event bids and related marketing campaigns often tell us about the benefits that mega-events may bestow on host cities, such as community pride, enhanced community cohesion and/or urban regeneration. However, many intangible, or soft, opportunities are not always backed up by evidence, or underpinned by an adequate understanding of how these outcomes are realised. This chapter presents an overview of recent research in the areas of social and environmental consequences of mega-events, including: a) civic pride and community cohesion; b) urban regeneration and displacement effects; and c) environmental impacts and legacies.

Waller, D.S. & Waller, H.J. 2017, 'Ghost or Avatar? The Value of Conserving Heritage Signs' in Schutt, S., Roberts, S. & White, L. (eds), Advertising and Public Memory Social, Cultural and Historical Perspectives on Ghost Signs, Routledge Research in Cultural and Media Studies, London, pp. 289-304.
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Contributors to this volume examine the complex relationships between the signs and those who commissioned them, painted them, viewed them and view them today.

Wearing, S.L. & Wearing, M. 2017, 'Eco-tourism or Eco-utilitarianism – exploring the new debates in Eco-tourism' in Williams, P. (ed), Special Interest Tourism: Concepts, Contexts and Cases, CABI, Oxon.
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Wearing, S.L. & Wearing, M. (in press 2016) ‘Eco-tourism or Eco-utilitarianism – exploring the new debates in Eco-tourism. , in Paul Williams (eds) Special Interest Tourism: Concepts, Contexts and Cases, CABI, Oxon, UK. https://cab.presswarehouse.com/books/bookdetail.aspx?productid=473983.

Wearing, S.L., Small, J. & Foley, C. 2017, 'Leisure and Gender Relations' in Mansfield, Caudwell, Watson & Wheaton (eds), The Handbook of Feminisms in Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, Palgrave MacMillan.

Wearing, S.L., Wearing, M. & Jobberns, C. 2017, 'Munch Crunch its Whale for Lunch: Exploring the politics of Japanese Whaling' in Animals as Food: Ethical Implications for Tourism.
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Wearing, S.L., Wearing, M. & Jobberns, C. (in progress 2017) Munch Crunch its Whale for Lunch: Exploring the politics of Japanese Whaling, Carol S. Kline, Animals as Food: Ethical Implications for Tourism.

Journal articles

Adair, D., Pearce, S., Maxwell, H. & Stronach, M. 2017, 'Indigenous Australian women and sport: Findings and recommendations from a parliamentary inquiry', Sport in Society.
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Adair, D., Westberg, K., Stavros, C., Smith, A.C.T., Newton, J., Lindsay, S., Kelly, S. & Beus, S. 2017, 'Exploring the wicked problem of athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport', Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1-36.
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Ahuja, S., Heizmann, H. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Of Wannabes and CAD monkeys: Emotional experiences of becoming architects in large firms', Human Relations.

Ahuja, S., Nikolova, N. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Paradoxical Identity: The changing nature of architectural work and its relation to architects' identity', Journal of Professions and Organizations, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 2-19.
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Alexeev, V., Dungey, M. & Yao, W. 2017, 'Time-varying continuous and jump betas: The role of firm characteristics and periods of stress', Journal of Empirical Finance, vol. 40, pp. 1-19.
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Using high frequency data we decompose the time-varying beta for stocks into beta for continuous systematic risk and beta for discontinuous systematic risk. Estimated discontinuous betas for S&P500 constituents over 2003-2011 generally exceed the corresponding continuous betas. Smaller stocks are more sensitive to discontinuities than their larger counterparts, and during periods of financial distress, high leverage stocks are more exposed to systematic risk. Higher credit ratings and lower volatility are each associated with smaller betas. Industry effects are also apparent. We use the estimates to show that discontinuous risk carries a significantly positive premium, but continuous risk does not.

Américo, B. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'How not to read and learn literally', Organization.

Anthonisz, S. & Putnins, T.J. 2017, 'Asset pricing with downside liquidity risks', Management Science, vol. (Forthcoming).
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Armenio, R., Owens, B., Yam, K.C., Bluhm, D., Cunha, M.P., Silard, A., Gonçalves, L., Martins, M., Simpson, A.V. & Liu, W. 2017, 'Leader humility and team performance: Exploring the mechanisms of team PsyCap and task allocation effectivenes', Journal of Management.
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Although there is a growing interest toward the topic of leader humility, extant research has largely failed to consider the underlying mechanisms through which leader humility influences team outcomes. In this research, we integrate the emerging literature of leader humility and social information processing theory to theorize how leader humility facilitates the development of collective team psychological capital, leading to higher team task allocation effectiveness and team performance. While Owens and Hekman (2016) suggest that leader humility has homogenous effects on followers, we propose a potential heterogeneous effect based on the complementarity literature (e.g., Tiedens, Unzueta, & Young, 2007) and the principle of equifinality (leaders may influence team outcomes through multiple pathways; Morgeson, DeRue, & Karam, 2010). In three studies conducted in China, Singapore, and Portugal, including an experiment, a multisource field study, and a three-wave multisource field study, we find support for our hypotheses that leader humility enhances team performance serially through increased team psychological capital and team task allocation effectiveness. We discuss the theoretical implications of our work to the leader humility, psychological capital, and team effectiveness literatures; and offer suggestions for future research.

Askegaard, S., Dubelaar, C., Zlatevska, N. & Holden, S.S. 2017, 'Food portions and marketing: Editorial', Journal of Business Research, vol. 75, no. June, pp. 172-175.
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Bagg, M.K., Hübscher, M., Rabey, M., Wand, B.M., O’Hagan, E., Moseley, L., Stanton, T.R., Maher, C.G., Goodall, S., Saing, S., O’Connell, N.E., Luomajoki, H. & McAuley, J.H. 2017, 'The RESOLVE Trial for people with Chronic Low Back Pain: Protocol for a randomised clinical trial', Journal of Physiotherapy, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 47-48.

Barti, M., Simpson, A. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Proclaiming the business school', Management Learning.

Bateman, H., Eckert, C., Iskhakov, F., Louviere, J., Satchell, S. & Thorp, S. 2017, 'Default and naive diversification heuristics in annuity choice', vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 32-57.
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Retirement income stream products are difficult for consumers to choose because of their high perceived risk, irreversibility, high expenditure, little opportunity for social learning and distant consequences. Prior literature is unclear about consumers’ use of heuristics in decumulation decisions or whether sociodemographics can help identify vulnerable consumers. In the context of Australia’s retirement income arrangements, we examine choices of life annuities and phased withdrawal products, and identify use of default options and the diversification (1/ n or 50:50) heuristic using a novel finite mixture modelling approach. The innovative feature of this approach is that it captures the very specific allocation pattern associated with choices based on deterministic decision rules, namely pronounced spikes at the locations of the particular heuristics with little mass in their surroundings. We show that more than 30% of decumulation choices rely on these two heuristics, and that cognitive and product knowledge limitations contribute to using such heuristics. The results have implications for public policy on decumulation of retirement savings, regulation of product disclosures and providers of annuity and phased withdrawal products. More generally, our model has the potential to provide better understanding of the use of heuristics in consumer decisions.

Bateman, H., Eckert, C., Iskhakov, F., Louviere, J., Satchell, S. & Thorp, S. 2017, 'Default and naive diversification heuristics in annuity choice', Australian Journal of Management, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 32-57.
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Retirement income stream products are difficult for consumers to choose because of their high perceived risk, irreversibility, high expenditure, little opportunity for social learning and distant consequences. Prior literature is unclear about consumers’ use of heuristics in decumulation decisions or whether sociodemographics can help identify vulnerable consumers. In the context of Australia’s retirement income arrangements, we examine choices of life annuities and phased withdrawal products, and identify use of default options and the diversification (1/n or 50:50) heuristic using a novel finite mixture modelling approach. The innovative feature of this approach is that it captures the very specific allocation pattern associated with choices based on deterministic decision rules, namely pronounced spikes at the locations of the particular heuristics with little mass in their surroundings. We show that more than 30% of decumulation choices rely on these two heuristics, and that cognitive and product knowledge limitations contribute to using such heuristics. The results have implications for public policy on decumulation of retirement savings, regulation of product disclosures and providers of annuity and phased withdrawal products. More generally, our model has the potential to provide better understanding of the use of heuristics in consumer decisions

Bird, R., Gao, X. & Yeung, D. 2017, 'Time-series and cross-sectional momentum strategies under alternative implementation strategies', Australian Journal of Management, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 230-251.
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Björk, J. & Hölzle, K. 2017, 'Editorial', Creativity and Innovation Management, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 3-4.
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Buckley, N., Mestelman, S., Muller, A., Schott, S. & Zhang, J. 2017, 'The Effects of Communication on the Partnership Solution to the Commons', Environmental and Resource Economics.
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Bugeja, M., Matolcsy, Z. & Spiropoulos, H. 2017, 'The CEO Pay Slice: managerial power or efficient contracting? Some indirect evidence', Journal of Contemporary Accounting and Economics, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 69-87.
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Bugeja, M., Matolcsy, Z.P., Mehdi, W. & Spiropoulos, H. 2017, 'Is non-executive directors' pay or industry expertise related to takeover premiums, abnormal returns and offer price revisions?', Australian Journal of Management.
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We examine the association between various takeover outcomes and bidding firm non-executive directors’ (NEDs) compensation and expertise in the target firm industry. In our sample of 272 acquisitions by ASX listed firms between 2004 and 2011, we find that NEDs’ relative compensation and industry expertise have a negative association with the bid premium. We also find that NEDs’ relative compensation is positively associated with the bidding firm’s market reaction to the takeover announcement, and NEDs’ industry expertise is associated with a lower likelihood of an increase in the offer price, particularly for M&As viewed negatively by the market. These results are consistent with higher NEDs’ relative compensation and industry expertise leading to more effective board monitoring and advising.

Carrara, S. & Longden, T. 2017, 'Freight futures: The potential impact of road freight on climate policy', Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment.
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This paper describes changes to the modelling of the transport sector in the WITCH (World Induced Technical Change Hybrid) model to incorporate road freight and account for the intensity of freight with respect to GDP. Modelling freight demand based on the intensity of freight with respect to GDP allows for a focus on the importance of road freight with respect to the cost-effective achievement of climate policy targets. These climate policy targets are explored using different GDP pathways between 2005 and 2100, which are sourced from the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs) database. Our modelling shows that the decarbonisation of the freight sector tends to occur in the second part of the century and that the sector decarbonises by a lower extent than the rest of the economy. Decarbonising road freight on a global scale remains a challenge even when notable progress in biofuels and electric vehicles has been accounted for.

Casavecchia, L. & Suh, J.Y. 2017, 'Managerial incentives for risk-taking and internal capital allocation', Australian Journal of Management.
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Cason, T., Sheremeta, R. & Zhang, J. 2017, 'Asymmetric and Endogenous Communication in Competition Between Groups', Experimental Economics.
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Cerrato, M., Crosby, A.J., Kim, M. & Zhao, Y. 2017, 'The Joint Credit Risk of UK Global-Systemically Important Banks', Journal of Futures Markets.

Cerrato, M., Crosby, J., Kim, M. & Zhao, Y. 2017, 'Relation between higher order comoments and dependence structure of equity portfolio', Journal of Empirical Finance, vol. 40, pp. 101-120.
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© 2016 Elsevier LtdWe study a relation between higher order comoments and dependence structure of equity portfolio in the US and UK by relying on a simple portfolio approach where equity portfolios are sorted on the higher order comoments. We find that beta and coskewness are positively related with a copula correlation, whereas cokurtosis is negatively related with it. We also find that beta positively associates with an asymmetric tail dependence whilst coskewness negatively associates with it. Furthermore, two extreme equity portfolios sorted on the higher order comoments are closely correlated and their dependence structure is strongly time-varying and nonlinear. Backtesting results of value-at-risk and expected shortfall demonstrate the importance of dynamic modeling of asymmetric tail dependence in the risk management of extreme events.

Chan, A., Clegg, S.R. & Warr, M. 2017, 'Translating Intervention: When Corporate Culture Meets Chinese Socialism', Journal of Management Inquiry.

Chan, J.C.C. 2017, 'Specification tests for time-varying parameter models with stochastic volatility', Econometric Reviews, pp. 1-17.
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2016 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLCWe propose an easy technique to test for time-variation in coefficients and volatilities. Specifically, by using a noncentered parameterization for state space models, we develop a method to directly calculate the relevant Bayes factor using the Savage–Dickey density ratio—thus avoiding the computation of the marginal likelihood altogether. The proposed methodology is illustrated via two empirical applications. In the first application, we test for time-variation in the volatility of inflation in the G7 countries. The second application investigates if there is substantial time-variation in the nonaccelerating inflation rate of unemployment (NAIRU) in the United States.

Charki, M.H., Josserand, E.L. & Boukef-Charki, N. 2017, 'The paradoxical effects of legal intervention over unethical information technology use: A rational choice theory perspective', Journal of Strategic Information Systems, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 58-76.
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While the IS literature offers rich insights into the kinds, causes and consequences of unethical information technology use (UITU), we know little about the degree to which legal intervention may mitigate UITU. Our research aims at understanding how legal intervention could mitigate UITU by influencing the cost-benefit analysis in determining the decision to commit such unethical use of IT. Our contributions are twofold. First, we provide testable propositions on the role of legal intervention. Second, we offer an innovative take on intervention – conceived as a multi-mechanism process that adapts to UITU as well as to the way IT users negotiate the IT artifact.

Charles, M., Farr-Wharton, B., von der Heidt, T. & Sheldon, N. 2017, 'Evaluating Perry’s structured approach for professional doctorate theses', Education + Training, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 215-230.
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Chen, Z., Gallagher, D.R. & Lee, A.D. 2017, 'Testing the effect of portfolio holdings disclosure in an environment absent of mandatory disclosure', Accounting and Finance, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 113-129.
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© 2016 AFAANZ.This study examines a number of portfolio disclosure regimes with respect to accuracy and susceptibility to copycat behaviour in an environment absent of mandatory disclosure. We find that periodic portfolio disclosure tends to underestimate true excess performance as well as idiosyncratic risk in top-quartile fund managers, with longer inter-reporting intervals tending to result in greater differences. 'Copycat funds' following the disclosed holdings of top-tier managers significantly underperform the underlying fund, while copycats following bottom-tier managers significantly outperform the underlying fund. Our findings suggest that periodic reporting at monthly intervals or longer would not affect fund alpha generation.

Cheng, M., Edwards, D., Darcy, S. & Redfern, K.A. 2017, 'A tri-method approach to a review of adventure tourism literature: bibliometric analysis, content analysis and a quantitative systematic literature review', Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Research.
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This paper provides an objective, systematic and integrated review of the Western academic literature on adventure tourism to discover the theoretical foundations and key themes underlying the field by combining three complementary approaches of bibliometric analysis, content analysis and a quantitative systematic review. Some 114 publications on adventure tourism were identified that revealed three broad areas of foci with adventure tourism research: (1) adventure tourism experience, (2) destination planning and development, and (3) adventure tourism operators. Adventure tourism has an intellectual tradition from multiple disciplines, such as the social psychology of sport and recreation. There is an under-representation of studies examining non-Western tourists in their own geographic contexts or non-Western tourists in Western geographic contexts. Our findings pave ways for developing a more robust framework and holistic understanding of the adventure tourism field.

Cheng, M., Wong, A., Wearing, S.L. & McDonald, M. 2017, 'Ecotourism social media initiatives in China', Journal of Sustainable Tourism, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 416-432.
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The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of social media by ecotourism management agencies and how this potentially changes the relationship between the ecotourist and the natural environment. It examines the meaning of ecotourism and the way that social media shapes visitor perceptions and meaning through an examination of the content of 775 Sina microblog postings from five leading ecotourism site management agencies in China. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the social media postings, a series of semi-structured interviews was also conducted with followers and management agencies. The findings provide an enhanced understanding of ecotourism marketing and its impacts on the ecotourist while also creating a framework for the use of social media to market ecotourism. The framework outlines the importance of the meanings associated with this form of communication through its promotional appeal to tourists and the outcomes for both the ecotourist and site management.

Cheng, M., Wong, I. & Prideaux, B. 2017, 'Political Travel Constraint: The Role of Chinese Popular Nationalism', Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 383-397.
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This study conceptualized a new type of political travel constraint by examining the role that popular nationalism has on Chinese outbound travel. Using a case study approach based on the 2012 Diaoyu/Senkaku Island Incident between China and Japan, the study demonstrates how Chinese popular nationalism has the potential to shape the geopolitical environment of all outbound Chinese tourism. The study proposes a new model that can be used to illustrate how popular nationalism may affect bilateral tourism in other settings. Findings of this study offer important insights for both scholars and pra

Chiarella, C. & Di Guilmi, C. 2017, 'Monetary Policy and Debt Deflation: Some Computational Experiments', Macroeconomic Dynamics, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 214-242.
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 The paper presents an agent-based model to study the possible effects of different fiscal and monetary policies in the context of debt deflation. We introduce a modified Taylor rule that includes the financial position of firms as a target. Monte Carlo simulations provide a representation of the complex feedback effects generated by the interaction among the different transmission channels of monetary policy. The model also reproduces the evidence of low inflation during stock market booms and shows how it can lead to overinvestment and destabilize the system. The paper also investigates the possible reasons behind this stylized fact by testing different behavioral rules for the central bank. We find that, in a context of sticky prices and volatile expectations, endogenous credit creation can be identified as the main source of the divergent dynamics of prices in the real and financial sectors.

Chiarella, C., He, X.Z., Shi, L. & Wei, L. 2017, 'A behavioural model of investor sentiment in limit order markets', Quantitative Finance, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 71-86.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupBy incorporating behavioural sentiment in a model of a limit order market, we show that behavioural sentiment not only helps to replicate most of the stylized facts in limit order markets simultaneously, but it also plays a unique role in explaining those stylized facts that cannot be explained by noise trading, such as fat tails in the return distribution, long memory in the trading volume, an increasing and non-linear relationship between trade imbalance and mid-price returns, as well as the diagonal effect, or event clustering, in order submission types. The results show that behavioural sentiment is an important driving force behind many of the well-documented stylized facts in limit order markets.

Clarke, T., Gholamshahi, S. & Jarvis, W. 2017, 'The Impact of Corporate Governance on Compounding Inequality: Maximising Shareholder Value and Inflating Executive Pay', Critical Perspectives on Accounting, vol. 39, no. 4.
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Clarke, T., Kingsford Smith, D. & Rogers, J. 2017, 'Banking and the Limits of Professionalism', University of New South Wales Law Journal, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 411-455.
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A primary question is whether banking could become a profession. The business terrain of finance is the most hazardous on which to establish the practices of profession.. We start from the position that whether banking is, or might become, a profession is not obvious, for a number of reasons. The first is the intense government regulation which is generally the primary mode of securing the benefits of banking and limiting its undesirable effects. External regulation tends be regarded as a definitional and practical threat to the self-regulation that marks out traditional professionalism. Second, traditional professional logic is said to promote as one of its distinguishing features a contrast with, and at least to some extent, a corrective to the world of business, a world ‘dominated by large bureaucratic organizations, competitive markets, managerial control, deskilling or dehumanizing tendencies and a markedly for-profit logic’. Meanwhile, some bankers perceive this aggressive for-profit orientation as essential and a justification against change. Evidence to the Inquiry included the view of a senior banker that: ‘Banking is a strictly profit-making business, and is not, and never has been, a profession in the sense that, say, medicine or law is’.

Claussen, A., Löhr, S., Rösch, D. & Scheule, H. 2017, 'Valuation of systematic risk in the cross-section of credit default swap spreads', Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance.
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© 2016 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.We analyze the pricing of systematic risk factors in credit default swap (CDS) contracts in a two-stage empirical framework. Firstly we estimate contract-specific sensitivities (betas) to several systematic risk factors by time-series regressions using quoted CDS spreads of 339 U.S. entities from January 2004 to December 2010. Secondly, we show that these contract-specific sensitivities are cross-sectionally priced in CDS spreads after controlling for individual risk factors. We find that the credit market climate, the Cross-market Correlation, and the market volatility explain CDS spread changes and that their corresponding sensitivities (betas) are particularly priced in the cross-section. Our basic risk factors explain about 83% (90%) of the CDS spreads prior to (during) the crisis.

Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Ideal Type', The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, vol. V1 - 01/12/2017, no. Ritzer wbeos0851.tex, pp. 1-2.
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Clegg, S.R. & Baunsgaard, V.B. 2017, 'Strategy in Crisis'.

Clegg, S.R. & Cuhna, M.P.E. 2017, 'Liquid Organization', Organization Studies.

Clegg, S.R., Killen, C., Sankaran, S. & Biesenthal, C. 2017, 'Practices, projects and portfolios: current research trends and new directions', International Journal of Project Management.

Clegg, S.R., Nikolova, N. & Knight, E. 2017, 'The persons in the practices: How elite strategists’ perceptions of their role shape strategic activities.'.

Coldevin, G.H., Carlsen, A., Clegg, S.R., Pitsis, T.S. & Antonacopoulou, E. 2017, 'Idea Work in Organizations', Human Relations.

Cronin, P.A., Kirkbidge, B., Bang, A., Smith, D., Parkinson, B. & Haywood, P. 2017, 'Long-term health care costs for patients with prostate cancer: A population-wide longitudinal study in New South Wales Australia', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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Cronin, P.A., Reeve, R., Viney, R., McCabe, P. & Goodall, S. 2017, 'The impact of childhood language difficulties on healthcare costs from 4 to 13 years: Australian longitudinal study', International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.

Cunha, M.P., Cardona, M.J., Clegg, S.R., Gomes, J.F.S., Hoyos, M.M., Manchola, I.D.S. & Rego, A. 2017, 'Institutions Going Emotional: A Case Study Of How Leadership Succession Derails', Leadership.

Cunha, M.P.E., Clegg, S.R., Costa, C., Leite, A.P., Rego, A., Simpson, A.V., Sousa, M.O.D. & Sousa, M. 2017, 'Gemeinschaft in the midst of Gesellschaft? Love as an organizational virtue', Journal of Management, Spirituality & Religion, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 3-21.
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Love is a powerful human process that has attracted the attention of scholars within the cultural and scientific domains. Thus far, the majority of management scholars have tended to neglect love as a relevant topic of theorizing and research. Given the recent interest in the phenomenon in allied fields such as sociology and psychology, this is surprising. We create, inductively, an archetypical image of how managers make sense of the meaning of love as an organizational phenomenon by means of a sample of Christian managers. The findings indicate that such managers associate love with two core dimensions. First, they describe love as an expression of virtue. Second, they link love with a sense of community-ship. Organizational love can thus be theorized as the exercise of constructing virtuous, other-oriented human communities that transcend the productive functions of work and respond to important human needs, fulfilling normative performativity.

Cunha, M.P.E., Rego, A., Clegg, S.R., Marcelino, A.R. & Jarvis, W. 2017, 'Agentic Stewardship', Organization Studies.

Daniels, B., Lord, S., Kiely, B., Houssami, N., Lu, C., Ward, R., Haywood, P. & Pearson, S. 2017, 'Use and outcomes of targeted therapies in early and metastatic HER2–positive breast cancer in Australia: Protocol detailing observations in a whole of population cohort', BMJ Open, vol. 7:e014439.
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Darcy, S.A., Lock, D. & Taylor, T. 2017, 'Enabling Inclusive Sport Participation: Effects of Disability and Support Needs on Constraints to Sport Participation', Leisure Sciences: an interdisciplinary journal, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 20-41.
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Framed by a social approach to disability and leisure constraints theory, this paper presents the results of a national study examining the constraints to sport participation for people with disability. Responses were obtained from a multi-platform questionnaire survey capturing data on constraints to participation, dimensions of disability, and level of support needs. The Exploratory Factor Analysis identified five structural together with intrapersonal and interpersonal constraint factors. While intrapersonal and interpersonal considerations were found to constrain sport participation and nonparticipation, the five structural factors had the most significant constraining impact on sport participation. The findings showed that disability type and level of support needs explain significant variations in constraints to participation and nonparticipation. When the 2-Way MANOVA included type of disability and level of support needs as contingent independent variables, the level of support needs was the most significant indicator of the likelihood of having constraints to participation or nonparticipation

Darcy, S.A., Maxwell, H & Green, J. 2017, 'I’ve Got a Mobile Phone Too! Hard and Soft Assistive Technology Customisation and Supportive Call Centres For People with Disability', Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology.
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De Abreu Lourenco, R., Haas, M., Hall, J. & Viney, R. 2017, 'Valuing meta-health effects for use in economic evaluations to inform reimbursement decisions: a review of the evidence', PharmacoEconomics, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 347-362.
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De Abreu Lourenco, R., Kenny, P., Haas, M.R. & Hall, J. 2017, 'Factors affecting general practitioner charges and Medicare bulk-billing: results of a survey of Australians - erratum.', Med J Aust, vol. 206, no. 7, pp. 326-326.

de Groot, S., van der Linden, N., Franken, M.G., Blommestein, H.M., Leeneman, B., van Rooijen, E., van der Hoeven, J.J.M., Wouters, M.W., Westgeest, H.M. & Uyl-de Groot, C.A. 2017, 'Balancing the Optimal and the Feasible: A Practical Guide for Setting Up Patient Registries for the Collection of Real-World Data for Health Care Decision Making Based on Dutch Experiences', Value in Health, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 627-636.
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© 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Objectives: The aim of this article was to provide practical guidance in setting up patient registries to facilitate real-world data collection for health care decision making. Methods: This guidance was based on our experiences and involvement in setting up patient registries in oncology in the Netherlands. All aspects were structured according to 1) mission and goals ("the Why"), 2) stakeholders and funding ("the Who"), 3) type and content ("the What"), and 4) identification and recruitment of patients, data handling, and pharmacovigilance ("the How"). Results: The mission of most patient registries is improving patient health by improving the quality of patient care; monitoring and evaluating patient care is often the primary goal ("the Why"). It is important to align the objectives of the registry and agree on a clear and functional governance structure with all stakeholders ("the Who"). There is often a trade off between reliability, validity, and specificity of data elements and feasibility of data collection ("the What"). Patient privacy should be carefully protected, and address (inter-)national and local regulations. Patient registries can reveal unique safety information, but it can be challenging to comply with pharmacovigilance guidelines ("the How"). Conclusions: It is crucial to set up an efficient patient registry that serves its aims by collecting the right data of the right patient in the right way. It can be expected that patient registries will become the new standard alongside randomized controlled trials due to their unique value.

Devauny, F.X. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'The ‘ontological turn’ of anthropology: Implications for debates about ontologies in MOS', Theory, Culture and Society: explorations in critical social science.

Devinney, T.M. & Hohberger, J. 2017, 'The past is prologue: Moving on from Culture’s Consequences', Journal of International Business Studies, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 48-62.
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Dewynne, J. & El-Hassan, N. 2017, 'The Valuation of Self-funding Instalment Warrants', International Journal of Theoretical and Applied Finance.

Dickson, T., Misener, L. & Darcy, S.A. 2017, 'Enhancing destination competitiveness through disability sport event legacies: developing an interdisciplinary typology', International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management.
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Dille, T., Soderlund, J. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Temporal Conditioning and Institutional Pluralism: Exploring the Nature and Dynamics of Inter-institutional Temporary Organizations', Journal of Management Studies.

Edwards, D., Cheng, M., Wong, A., Zhang, J. & Wu, Q. 2017, 'Ambassadors of Knowledge Sharing: Co-produced Travel Information Through Tourist-Local Social Media Exchange', International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 690-708.
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Purpose: The aim of this study is to understand the knowledge sharing structure and co-production of trip-related knowledge through online travel forums. Design/methodology/approach: The travel forum threads were collected from TripAdvisor Sydney travel forum for the period from 2010 to 2014, which contains 115,847 threads from 8,346 conversations. The data analytical technique was based on a novel methodological approach - visual analytics including semantic pattern generation and network analysis. Findings: Findings indicate that the knowledge structure is created by community residents who camouflage as local experts, serve as ambassadors of a destination. The knowledge structure presents collective intelligence co-produced by community residents and tourists. Further findings reveal how these community residents associate with each other and form a knowledge repertoire with information covering various travel domain areas. Practical implications: The study offers valuable insights to help destination management organizations and tour operators identify existing and emerging tourism issues to achieve a competitive destination advantage. Originality/value: This study highlights the process of social media mediated travel knowledge co-production. It also discovers how community residents engage in reaching out to tourists by camouflaging as ordinary users.

Ekstrom, E., Glover, K. & Leniec, M. 2017, 'Dynkin games with heterogeneous beliefs', Journal of Applied Probability, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 236-251.

Ellis, R.B. & Waller, D.S. 2017, 'Marketing Education at the University of Melbourne', History of Education Review, vol. 46, no. 1.

Fam, D., Beal, C. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'A retrospective institutional analysis of a ‘path not taken’ - the emergence of urine diversion systems in Australia', Journal of Organizational Change Management.

Fee, A. & McGrath-Champ, S. 2017, 'The role of human resources in protecting expatriates: insights from the international aid and development sector', The International Journal of Human Resource Management.
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Multinational organisations of all kinds face growing challenges to ensure that their international operations and staff are safe from threat of physical and psychological danger. This is particularly acute in the international aid and development sector, where expatriate field staff are both valuable and vulnerable, and where organisations often confront limited infrastructure and financial resources. This paper reports an empirical study exploring the ways in which 10 international non-government organisations from 5 nations (USA, UK, Germany, Switzerland, Australia), all with substantial experience operating in high-risk contexts, manage the safety and security of their expatriate staff. Our results unearth four areas where these organisations seek to build in-house competence, centred on culture building, and supported by a suite of human resource practices relating to people services, information services and communication services. These competencies coalesce around an overarching philosophy towards safety and security that we describe as ‘personal responsibility and empowerment’.

Fee, A., Heizmann, H. & Gray, S.J. 2017, 'Towards a theory of effective cross-cultural capacity development: the experiences of Australian international NGO expatriates in Vietnam', The International Journal of Human Resource Management.
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Capacity development (CD) partnerships between highly qualified expatriates and host-country counterparts are a commonly used tool by non-government organisations (NGOs) working in international development. This article reports on an empirical investigation of the factors contributing to the effectiveness of these interpersonal cross-cultural CD relationships. Using a variant of the critical incident technique, we explored 40 such relationships (20 effective and 20 ineffective) reported by 20 expatriates from an Australian international NGO who were embedded in international and domestic NGOs and government organisations in Vietnam. From our analysis, we propose a theoretical model that identifies the features of effective cross-cultural CD relationships. The model is intended to lay the foundation for future research as well as strategic action by organisations. It identifies shared trust between expatriate and counterpart as central to effective CD, supported by five enabling conditions relating to the perceptions, abilities and attitudes of participants, the way the work roles are structured, and the way that leaders in the host organisations manage the context of the relationship.

Fee, A., McGrath-Champ, S. & Berti, M. 2017, 'Protecting expatriates in hostile environments: institutional forces influencing the safety and security practices of internationally active organisations', The International Journal of Human Resource Management, pp. 1-28.
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Fiebig, D., Viney, R.C., Knox, S., Haas, M., Street, D., Hole, A.R., Weisberg, E. & Bateson, D. 2017, 'Consideration sets and their role in modelling doctor recommendations about contraceptives', Health Economics, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 54-73.
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Fischer, M. & Himme, A. 2017, 'The financial brand value chain: How brand investments contribute to the financial health of firms', International Journal of Research in Marketing, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 137-153.
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Marketing and finance executives follow different objectives and focus on different stakeholder groups. Marketers want to create sales impact. Finance executives are concerned about the financial health of the firm. As a result, both worlds tend to be rather disconnected in their daily business. We argue that this does not reflect the dynamics of the firm where important marketing and financial metrics in fact interact. As long as marketing and finance officers do not fully appreciate the interplay of their key metrics, their decisions are likely to be suboptimal. This article proposes a simultaneous equation model that reflects the interaction of marketing and finance-domain variables in the value creation process. We focus on brand-building activities and the attraction of capital as major tasks of marketing and finance officers. Our model shows how advertising and other investments increase customer-based brand equity (CBBE) that in turn impacts financial leverage and credit spread and ultimately elevates the level of financial resources. Based on a broad sample of 155 firms covering various B2C industries, we test for the empirical relevance of our model. We also assess the practical significance of our results by transforming them into elasticities. Our results suggest that marketing and finance executives need to consider the dynamic interaction of their decision and performance variables to fully evaluate the effects of their decisions on the firm's financial health.

Fisher, J.C.D. & Wooders, J. 2017, 'Interacting information cascades: on the movement of conventions between groups', Economic Theory, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 211-231.
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Foley, C. 2017, 'The art of wasting time: sociability, friendship, community and holidays', Leisure Studies, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 1-20.
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© 2015 Taylor & Francis Slow tourism is motivated by the desire for personal and communal well-being. It emerged as an antidote to the fast-paced imperatives of global capitalism that urge the entrepreneurial self to speed up and work harder to achieve and demonstrate desired social status. The entrepreneurial self can be understood in the contexts of neoliberalism and the class- and gender-based histories of time-thrift and rational recreation; the entrepreneurial self uses leisure time purposively in the pursuit of status, avoids idle pursuits and has restricted capacity to experience leisurely social relationships. In this article, it is argued that leisurely social relations can be reclaimed by letting go, even temporarily, of time-thrift and the compulsion to use leisure time purposively. Data drawn from in-depth interviews with repeat visitors at two Australian caravan parks revealed that for the period of their holiday the tourists relax, refuse to be driven by schedules, socialise with other tourists and feel no compulsion to use time purposively. The key reasons the tourists return to the parks each year were for the friendships and the sense of community they experience as part of the holiday. Slow tourism by its very nature rejects time-thrift, however, as the movement is harnessed by global capitalism, slow tourism risks becoming a source of conspicuous consumption. The findings of this study suggest that friendship and community thrive more readily in conditions where the need to achieve and demonstrate social status is discarded along with time-thrift.

Foley, C., Faulkner, S., Small, J. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Women of the Kokoda: From Poverty to Empowerment in Sustainable Tourism Development', Tourism, Culture and Communication.

Freeman, W., Wells, P.A. & Wyatt, A. 2017, 'Measurement Model or Asset Type: Evidence from an Evaluation of the Relevance of Financial Assets'.

Fujak, H. & Frawley, S.M. 2017, 'Quantifying the value of sport broadcast rights', Media International Australia, pp. 1-17.
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Grant, A.L. & Chan, J.C.C. 2017, 'Reconciling output gaps: Unobserved components model and Hodrick–Prescott filter', Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, vol. 75, pp. 114-121.
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© 2017 Elsevier B.V.This paper reconciles two widely used trend–cycle decompositions of GDP that give markedly different estimates: the correlated unobserved components model yields output gaps that are small in amplitude, whereas the Hodrick–Prescott (HP) filter generates large and persistent cycles. By embedding the HP filter in an unobserved components model, we show that this difference arises due to differences in the way the stochastic trend is modeled. Moreover, the HP filter implies that the cyclical components are serially independent—an assumption that is decidedly rejected by the data. By relaxing this restrictive assumption, the augmented HP filter provides comparable model fit relative to the standard correlated unobserved components model.

Gu, M.Z. & Johar, M. 2017, 'Profiling hospital utilisation in a mixed public-private system', Applied Economics, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 361-375.
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Haeusler, G., Thursky, K., Mechinaud, F., Babl, F., De Abreu Lourenco, R., Slavin, M. & Phillips, B. 2017, 'Predicting Infectious ComplicatioNs In Children with Cancer: an external validation study', British Journal of Cancer.

Harvey, G., Rhodes, C.H., Vachhani, S.J. & Williams, K. 2017, 'Neo-villeiny and the service sector: the case of hyper flexible and precarious work in fitness centres', Work, Employment and Society, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 19-35.
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He, X. & Shi, L. 2017, 'Index Portfolio and Welfare Analysis Under Heterogeneous Beliefs', Journal of Banking and Finance, vol. 75, pp. 64-79.
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He, X. & Treich, N. 2017, 'Prediction market prices under risk aversion and heterogeneous beliefs', Journal of Mathematical Economics, vol. 70, pp. 105-114.
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He, X.Z., Lütkebohmert, E. & Xiao, Y. 2017, 'Rollover Risk and Credit Risk under Time-varying Margin', Quantitative Finance, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 455-469.
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For a firm financed by a mixture of collateralized (short-term) debt and uncollateralized (long-term) debt, we show that fluctuations in margin requirements, reflecting funding liquidity shocks, lead to increasing the firm’s default risk and credit spreads. The severity with which a firm is hit by increasing margin requirements highly depends on both its financing structure and debt maturity structure. Our results imply that an additional premium should be added when evaluating debt in order to account for rollover risks, especially for short-matured bonds. In terms of policy implications, our results strongly indicate that regulators should intervene fast to curtail margins in crisis periods and maintain a reasonably low margin level in order to effectively prevent creditors’ run on debt.

Heizmann, H. & Fox, S. 2017, 'O Partner, Where Art Thou? A critical discursive analysis of HR managers’ struggle for legitimacy', The International Journal of Human Resource Management.
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This study of HRM in an Australian insurance firm applies a critical discursive perspective to examine HR managers’ attempts to position themselves as Human Resources Business Partners. Analysing semi-structured interviews, we aim to provide a situated understanding of HR managers’ experiences as they sought to become accepted as co-equal partners by line management. Our findings draw attention to the gap between prescriptive accounts of HR Business Partnering and the tensions and legitimacy struggles HR managers face when adopting their new roles. We show the impact of line management’s resistance to HRM and the concomitant need for HR managers to legitimate their position in a new way. The introduction of an organizational culture survey, in particular, supplemented discursive attempts to promote the change amongst line managers and constituted a key driver in the process. Our study contributes to the study of HRM change by showing how the shift to an HRM business partnership model can be a precarious accomplishment: (1) enacted through the interweaving of discursive and socio-material practices, and (2) subject to the constraints of existing organisational power/knowledge relations.

Henckel, T., Menzies, G.D., Moffatt, P.G. & Zizzo, D.J. 2017, 'Sticky Belief Adjustment: A Double Hurdle Model and Experimental Evidence'.

Hingorani, A., Freeman, L. & Agudera, M. 2017, 'Impact of Immigration on Native and Ethnic Consumer Identity via Body Image', International Journal of Marketing Studies, vol. 9, no. 1.
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This research focuses on consumer identity of two under-researched but growing immigrant communities in Australia via the lens of the body image construct. Consistent with an emerging stream of research, body image is viewed as a part of identity. Given the variety of goods and services that have an impact on consumers’ perceptions of their body, and because consumers use products to create and convey desired identities, body image is also viewed as a part of consumer identity. Considering literature on identity, body image, and acculturation, exploratory research was undertaken to determine the impact of immigration on the identities of both immigrants and natives. Specifically, focus groups were conducted on two generations of Filipino- and Indian-Australian women as well as Anglo-Australian women. It was found that second generation immigrants have dual consumer identities where they balance the values, attitudes and lifestyles of both their home (i.e., native or heritage) and host cultures whereas first generation immigrants tend to retain their native consumer identity even if they appear to adopt values, attitudes, and lifestyles of the host culture. The impact of immigrants on consumer identities of native residents who are typically in the majority (i.e., the Anglo group) was not evident. Theoretical and practical implications including recommendations for marketing practitioners are then discussed followed by suggestions for future research.

Ho, H. 2017, 'Social Networking Site Use and Materialistic Values Among YouthThe Safeguarding Role of the Parent-Child Relationship and Self-Regulation', Communication Research, vol. In press.
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Johar, M., Maruyama, S. & Truong, J. 2017, 'The contribution of Western fast food to fast-growing body mass in China', Applied Economics, vol. 49, no. 8, pp. 797-811.
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The westernization of Asian countries has led to the rapid expansion of Western-style fast-food restaurants, which are believed to be fueling an unprecedented rise in body mass in these countries. This study tests this belief using longitudinal data from China. Exploiting the opening of a Western-style fast-food restaurant in a particular community, we conduct a transition analysis to make a more convincing causal interpretation than the standard cross-sectional or fixed-effects approach. Considering several measures of fatness, we find no robust evidence of Western fast food having a substantial effect overall, but there is some indication of effect heterogeneity.

Johar, M., Mu, C., van Gool, K. & Wong, C.Y. 2017, 'Bleeding hearts, profiteers, or both specialist physician fees in an unregulated market', Health Economics, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 528-535.
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Josserand, E.L., Schmitt, A. & Borzillo, S. 2017, 'Balancing Present Needs and Future Options: How Employees Leverage Social Networks with Clients', Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 38, no. 1.
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Jung, K., Dalton, B. & Willis, J. 2017, 'From revolutionary mother, to breadwinner, to the hyper-feminine woman: Fashion andthe social construction of femininity in North Korea', Asian Studies Review.
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In this paper we argue that North Korea’s socioeconomic transformation has had a profound and yet under-appreciated impact on the social construction of femininity. Drawing on forty-five in-depth interviews with North Korean refugees, interviews with regular visitors to North Korea and NGO workers, as well as our own field notes from trips to North Korea, we analyse changes over three discernible (yet overlapping) economic periods: the 1960s-1990s pre-famine period; the mid-1990s to late 2000s grassroots capitalism era; and the current Kim Jong Un period of quasi-capitalism. As dress is a discursive daily practice of gender, we focus on the practice of femininity as shown through North Korean women’s fashion choices. We argue that images of women in state propaganda have been shaped primarily by male leaders, but norms of femininity have shaped, and also been shaped by, women themselves. That is, the recent trend for North Korean women to dress in hyper-feminine styles can be explained in terms of women remaking themselves and planning their future lives.

Kardaras, C., Oblłój, J. & Platen, E. 2017, 'The numéraire property and long-term growth optimality for drawdown-constrained investments', Mathematical Finance, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 68-95.
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We consider the portfolio choice problem for a long-run investor in a general continuous semimartingale model. We combine the decision criterion of pathwise growth optimality with a flexible specification of attitude toward risk, encoded by a linear drawdown constraint imposed on admissible wealth processes. We define the constrained numéraire property through the notion of expected relative return and prove that drawdown-constrained numéraire portfolio exists and is unique, but may depend on the investment horizon. However, when sampled at the times of its maximum and asymptotically as the time-horizon becomes distant, the drawdown-constrained numéraire portfolio is given explicitly through a model-independent transformation of the unconstrained numéraire portfolio. The asymptotically growth-optimal strategy is obtained as limit of numéraire strategies on finite horizons.

Karlsson, P., Pilz, K. & Schlogl, E. 2017, 'Calibrating a Market Model with Stochastic Volatility to Commodity and Interest Rate Risk', Quantitative Finance, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 907-925.

Keller, L.R. & Wang, Y. 2017, 'Information Presentation in Decision and Risk Analysis: Answered, Partly Answered, and Unanswered Questions', Risk Analysis.
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© 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.For the last 30 years, researchers in risk analysis, decision analysis, and economics have consistently proven that decisionmakers employ different processes for evaluating and combining anticipated and actual losses, gains, delays, and surprises. Although rational models generally prescribe a consistent response, people's heuristic processes will sometimes lead them to be inconsistent in the way they respond to information presented in theoretically equivalent ways. We point out several promising future research directions by listing and detailing a series of answered, partly answered, and unanswered questions.

Kenny, P.M., Goodall, S., Street, D. & Greene, J. 2017, 'Choosing a Doctor: Does presentation format affect the way consumers use health care performance information?', The Patient: Patient Centered Outcomes Research.
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Khan, M.S., Scheule, H. & Wu, E. 2017, 'Funding liquidity and bank risk taking', Journal of Banking and Finance.
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© 2016 Elsevier B.V.This study examines the relationship between funding liquidity and bank risk taking. Using quarterly data for U.S. bank holding companies from 1986 to 2014, we find evidence that banks having lower funding liquidity risk as proxied by higher deposit ratios, take more risk. A reduction in banks' funding liquidity risk increases bank risk as evidenced by higher risk-weighted assets, greater liquidity creation and lower Z-scores. However, our results show that bank size and capital buffers usually limit banks from taking more risk when they have lower funding liquidity risk. Moreover, during the Global Financial Crisis banks with lower funding liquidity risk took less risk. The findings of this study have implications for bank regulators advocating greater liquidity and capital requirements for banks under Basel III.

Kyriazis, E., Massey, G.R., Couchman, P. & Johnson, L. 2017, 'Friend or foe? The effects of managerial politics on NPD team communication, collaboration and project success', R & D Management, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 61-74.
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Much existing work on new product development (NPD) team integration takes an economically rational perspective, specifying appropriate systems, structures and interactions. Few studies however have explored the effects of politics on working relationships between technically trained managers (TTMs; e.g., research and development managers) and marketing managers (MMs) during NPD. Our results reveal that intra-team politics has positive and negative effects on TTM/MM communication. This is important because communication positively influences collaboration and NPD success. Moreover, the effects of communication variables on these two outcome variables differ depending on whether one is a TTM or MM.

Lanis, R., Richardson, G. & Taylor, G. 2017, 'Board of Director Gender and Corporate Tax Aggressiveness: An Empirical Analysis', Journal of Business Ethics.
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© 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht This study examines the impact of board of director gender diversity on corporate tax aggressiveness. Based on a sample of 418 U.S. firms covering the 2006–2009 period (1672 firm-year observations), our ordinary least squares regression results show a negative and statistically significant association between female representation on the board and tax aggressiveness after controlling for endogeneity. Our results are consistent across several measures of tax aggressiveness and additional robustness checks.

Leung, L.T. & Bentley, N. 2017, 'Producing Leisured Laborers: developing higher education courses for the digital creative industries', The Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society, pp. 1-13.
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This article attempts to detail the range of assumptions and challenges in designing an undergraduate university degree in digital creative industries. Leaders in digital industries, who bemoan the general skills shortage and lack of “industry-ready” graduates, have identified the need for post-secondary education in this area. But in developing these new courses, how do we reconcile the traditional reflective, critical modes of academic practice with the fast and dynamic pace of the dot.com industries? How can slower-paced higher education and lifelong learning be meaningful to the current and future generations of digital natives who thrive on “just-in-time” knowledge? These important issues are analyzed and built upon to showcase the unique qualities and opportunities associated with tertiary education in this area. Overall, the article develops these high-level considerations practically by applying them to a pioneering undergraduate course in Australia that was launched in 2014.

Liu, H. 2017, 'Sensuality as subversion: Doing masculinity with Chinese Australian professionals', Gender, Work & Organization, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 194-212.
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Within western gender structures, dominant discourses of Asian men as weak, feminized and asexual continue to render Asian masculinities subordinate to white hegemonic ideals. Although research of gender in organization studies has revealed important insights into how gender might be redone or undone, non-white voices remain marginalized in this critical project. This article explores through in-depth interviews the ways by which Chinese cis-male professionals in Australia attempt to coopt desexualizing discourses and ‘do’ masculinity through sensuality. Specifically, the findings show how their sensuality is practised across various dimensions at work and beyond, including via the presentation of the self, relationships with others and representations in social texts. In presenting the voices of Asian men, this article seeks to illuminate their individual and collective pursuits for decolonization, agency and pleasure.

Liu, H. 2017, 'Undoing whiteness: The Dao of anti-racist diversity practice', Gender, Work and Organization, pp. 1-15.
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As Australia propels towards a so-called ‘Asian Century', pro-diversity discourses have begun to permeate organizations and society. Yet despite this outward commitment to ethno-cultural diversity, mainstream diversity discourses and practices have been critiqued for subordinating social justice agendas and reinforcing the dominance of whiteness. This article analyses in-depth interviews with 18 Chinese Australian managers and local councillors engaged in various forms of diversity advocacy and practice. By reading their voices via the Chinese philosophy of Daoism, I offer an anti-racist praxis of diversity that bears the potential to disrupt white supremacy through the strength of softness and the power of non-action.

Liu, H., Cutcher, L. & Grant, D. 2017, 'Authentic leadership in context: An analysis of banking CEO narratives during the global financial crisis', Human Relations, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 694-724.
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Lo, D.K. 2017, 'On the limit order behaviour of retail and non-retail investors', Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, vol. 44, pp. 1-12.
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Luckett, T., Chenoweth, L., Phillips, J., Brooks, D., Cook, J., Mitchell, G., Pond, D., Davidson, P., Beattie, E., Luscombe, G., Goodall, S., Fischer, T. & Agar, M. 2017, 'A facilitated approach to family case conferencing for people with advanced dementia living in nursing homes: Perceptions of Palliative Care Planning Coordinators and other health professionals in the IDEAL Study', International Pscychogeriatrics.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Organization Theory in Business and Management History: Present Status and Future Prospects', Business History Review.

Major, M.J., Conceicao, A. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'When power relations fail: The case of responsibility centres in Portuguese Hospitals', Accounting, Accountability and Auditing Journal.

Maruyama, S. & Johar, M. 2017, 'Do Siblings Free-Ride in 'being There' for Parents?', Quantitative Economics, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 277-316.
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There is a potential free-rider problem when several siblings consider future provision of care for their elderly parents. Siblings can commit to not providing long-term support by living far away. If location decisions are made by birth order, older siblings may enjoy a Örstmover advantage. We study siblingsílocation decisions relative to their parents by estimating a sequential participation game for US data. We Önd: (1) limited strategic behavior: in two-child families, more than 92% of children have a dominant strategy; and (2) a non-negligible public good problem: in families with multiple children, 18.3% more parents would have had at least one child living nearby had location decisions been made cooperatively

Matolcsy, Z.P. & Wakefield, J.A. 2017, 'Multinational headquarter control of wholly owned foreign subsidiaries', British Accounting Review, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 275-293.
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McDonald, M., Gough, B., Deville, A. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Social Psychology, Consumer Culture & Neoliberal Political Economy', Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour.

McDonald, M., Wearing, S.L. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Normalising ‘Staged Authenticity’ in Tourism: neoliberal governmentality and tourist encounters', Tourism Analysis.

McRae, I. & Van Gool, K. 2017, 'Variation in fees of medical specialists: problems, causes and solutions', Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 206, no. 4, pp. 162-163.

Michayluk, D.M. & Gerig, A. 2017, 'Automated Liquidity Provision', Pacific-Basin Finance Journal.

Mikkelsen, E. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Unpacking the meaning of conflict in organizational conflict research', Journal of Management Inquiry.

Mittal, N., Agarwal, R. & Selen, W. 2017, 'Value creation and the impact of policy interventions: Indian LPG supply chain case study', The International Journal of Logistics Management.
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Purpose: This paper demonstrates the development of key supply chain capabilities in the Indian public sector-run liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) supply chain. This case study has relevance to emerging markets grappling with problems caused by monopolies and subsidies. Further, this case study not only aims to improve operations of the LPG supply chain, but also re-designs its supply network to meet customers’ expectations. It illustrates value creation through growth in non-domestic sales, a reduction in consumption of subsidized LPG as a consequence of better understanding of customer needs and customer diversity, process reengineering and deployment of ICT systems, and change management and capability building across various LPG stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach – An interpretive research methodology is applied, using an illustrative single case study of the Indian public sector-run LPG supply chain. The research methodology is iterative and exploratory in nature, consisting of a back and forth process between extant literature and the field, as well as in-depth discussions/interviews with senior management, distributors and consumers. Findings – Key supply chain capabilities of an integrated and seamless ICT system, detection and blocking of duplicate/ghost connections, the capping of entitlements, and coordination and collaboration across various stakeholders, result in value creation for all stakeholders. When such collaboration across stakeholders’ spans both vertically and horizontally through the supply chain, change management and capability building are drivers of value creation through policy interventions and initiatives. Practical implications – Provides an illustrative example of meeting customers’ expectations, increasing consumer convenience, and improving service levels, amidst the complex subsidy challenges in LPG distribution in India. The economic and environmental benefits, as well as increased customer satisfaction, from policy int...

Moreno, D. & Wooders, J. 2017, 'Reserve prices in auctions with entry when the seller is risk-averse', Economics Letters, vol. 154, pp. 6-9.
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Morrison, M.D., Greig, J., Waller, D.S., McCulloch, R. & Read, D.M.Y. 2017, 'Effective Communication with difficult to reach landholders', Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 133-145.
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While considerable research has been undertaken to understand which communication channels are most effective at reaching landholders, much less research has examined which communication channels are most effective for reaching those landholder segments characterised by low program participation (i.e. ‘lifestylers’, traditional and absentee segments). Even less research has examined what messages most effectively engage these landholders, or landholders in general. In this study, eight communications campaigns were developed with specific messages and appeals that allowed us to examine the perceptions of difficult-to-reach landholders towards rational versus emotional, inform versus persuade and individual versus community-based appeals, using a qualitative methodology. The findings indicate that landholder’s perceptions of both rational and emotional messages depended on the congruence with segment values. Inform messages were found often to be well regarded, especially when they clarified eligibility and program benefits. Persuade messages could be effective, but this also depended on the consistency of the message with segment values. Community-based messages were often not well received, but they could be effective at reaching lifestylers.

Mu, C., De Abreu Lourenco, R. & van Gool, K. 2017, 'Is low priced primary care bad for quality? Evidence from Australian general practice', Applied Economics.

Mulhern, B., Labeit, A., Rowen, D., Knowles, E., Meadows, K., Elliott, J. & Brazier, J. 2017, 'Developing preference-based measures for diabetes: DHP-3D and DHP-5D', Diabetic Medicine.
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Mulhern, B., Norman, R., Lorgelly, P., Lancsar, E., Ratcliffe, J., Brazier, J. & Viney, R. 2017, 'Is Dimension Order Important when Valuing Health States Using Discrete Choice Experiments Including Duration?', PharmacoEconomics, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 439-451.
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Mulhern, B.J., Bansback, N., Hole, A.R. & Tsuchiya, A. 2017, 'Using Discrete Choice Experiment with duration to model EQ-5D-5L health state preferences: Testing experimental design strategies', Medical Decision Making, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 285-297.
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Mulhern, B.J., Pink, J., Rowen, D., Borghs, S., Butt, T., Hughes, D., Marson, A. & Brazier, J. 2017, 'Comparing generic and condition specific preference based measures in epilepsy: EQ-5D-3L and NEWQOL-6D', Value in Health, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 687-693.
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Naar, L. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Models at Work: Strategies for Innovating in Architectural Practice', Journal of Management Inquiry.

Naar, L., Nikolova, N. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Addressing the ontological gap between success and failure: the boundary object in architectural practice', Human Relations.

Navone, M., Dahiya, S. & Iannotta, G. 2017, 'Firm Opacity Lies in the Eye of the Beholder', Financial Management.

Nerich, V., Saing, S., Gamper, E.-.M., Holzner, B., Pivot, X., Viney, R. & Kemmler, G. 2017, 'Critical appraisal of health-state utility values used in breast cancer-related cost-utility analyses.', Breast Cancer Res Treat.
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PURPOSE: To review the data sources of health-state utility values (HSUVs), as well as their elicitation and use, in 140 breast cancer-related cost-utility analyses (CUAs), and to provide a critical appraisal of these. METHODS: A checklist was developed to guide the process of the critical appraisal. It is divided into three parts: the data source (three questions), elicitation method (four questions), and use (ten questions) of HSUVs in CUAs. Two independent reviewers performed the data extraction. A consensus was reached in case of disagreements. Data sources were categorized as "original study," "derived from the literature," or "other." RESULTS: The data source of HSUVs was always specified. When HSUVs were derived from the literature (90% of cases), the authors referred to a median number of two references as data sources. The critical appraisal of the elicitation of HSUVs in CUAs revealed considerable variability in terms of the quality of the reporting of the data source selection of HSUV. More details were provided by authors when HSUVs were elicited from an original study rather than derived from the literature. The use of HSUVs elicited from an original study was generally better described in terms of the checklist than were those derived from the literature. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the developed checklist, we were able to highlight the challenges that authors are facing when trying to adequately report HSUV used in CUAs. Our proposed checklist offers a good starting point for encouraging more explicit and comprehensive reporting of HSUVs in CUAs.

Nguyen, K.-.H., Mulhern, B., Kularatna, S., Byrnes, J., Moyle, W. & Comans, T. 2017, 'Developing a dementia-specific health state classification system for a new preference-based instrument AD-5D', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, vol. 15.
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Nguyen, P., Rahman, N. & Zhao, R. 2017, 'Returns to acquirers of listed and unlisted targets: An empirical study of Australian bidders', Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 24-48.
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Purpose This paper aims to evaluate the robustness of the listing effect in Australia, that is whether acquisitions of private firms create more value to the bidding firm’s shareholders than acquisitions of publicly listed firms. Design/methodology/approach The authors analyze the market reaction to the announcement of takeover bids initiated by Australian public firms on private and public targets over the period 1990-2011. The analysis controls for a wide range of bidder, deal and target country characteristics that are likely to correlate with the target’s listing status and acquirer abnormal returns. The authors also use a selection model to address the endogenous choice of the target’s listing status. Findings The results indicate that bidders experience significantly higher abnormal returns of about 1.7 per cent in the 11-day event window when the target is a private firm. The authors show that this result is broad-based and persistent. It does not appear to depend on whether the target is small or large; whether it is related or unrelated to the bidder’s industry; whether it is in the resources sector; and whether the transaction is domestic or cross-border. They find some evidence that bidder returns might be stronger for larger acquisitions, for unrelated targets, and in poor market conditions such as in the wake of the recent global financial crisis. Research limitations/implications The research would benefit from the inclusion of the bidding firm’s ownership and governance characteristics. Practical implications The results support the view that market frictions contribute to make private firms attractive targets. Originality/value The analysis confirms the pervasiveness of the listing effect in a market characterized by a lesser degree of competition, higher search costs and the significance of the natural resources sector.

Nikitopoulos Sklibosios, C., Cheng, B. & Schlogl, E. 2017, 'Empirical Pricing Performance on Long Dated Crude Oil Derivatives: Do Models with Stochastic Interest Rates Matter?', Journal of Banking and Finance.

Norman, R., Viney, R., Aaronson, N.K., Brazier, J.E., Cella, D., Costa, D.S.J., Fayers, P.M., Kemmler, G., Peacock, S., Pickard, A.S., Rowen, D., Street, D.J., Velikova, G., Young, T.A. & King, M.T. 2017, 'Erratum to: Using a discrete choice experiment to value the QLU-C10D: feasibility and sensitivity to presentation format.', Qual Life Res.
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Novak, J., Farr-Wharton, B., Brunetto, Y., Shacklock, K. & Brown, K. 2017, 'Safety outcomes for engineering asset management organizations: Old problem with new solutions?', Reliability Engineering and System Safety, vol. 160, pp. 67-73.
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The issue of safety and longevity of engineering assets is of increasing importance because of their impact when disasters happen. This paper addresses a literature gap by examining the role of workplace relationships in employees' safety behaviour, and builds on the Resilience Engineering (RE) framework by examining some organisational culture factors affecting how employees behave. A Social Exchange framework is used to examine the impact of supervisor-employee relationships, employee commitment to safety practices, and the type of maintenance culture upon employees’ commitment to safety and safety outcomes. Survey data from 284 technical and engineering employees in engineering asset management organisations within Australia were analyzed using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM). Effective employee relationships with management and a proactive maintenance culture were associated with employee commitment to safety culture and safety outcomes. The findings provide empirical support for embedding an effective organisational culture focused on a proactive maintenance approach, along with ensuring employees are committed to safety processes, to ensure safety outcomes and also asset longevity. One study contribution is that good safety outcomes do not develop in a vacuum; instead they are built on effective workplace relationships. Therefore, SET helps to explain the forming of effective safety culture.

Onyx, J.A., Darcy, S., Grabowski, S., Green, J. & Maxwell, H. 2017, 'Researching the social impact of arts and disability: Applying a new empirical tool and method', Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations.
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Palmer, T.-.A., Burke, P.F. & Aubusson, P. 2017, 'Why school students choose and reject science: a study of the factors that students consider when selecting subjects', International Journal of Science Education.
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Student study of science at school has been linked to the need to provide a scientifically capable workforce and a scientifically literate society. Educators, scientists, and policymakers are concerned that too few students are choosing science for study in their final years of school. How and why students choose and reject certain subjects, including science, at this time is unclear. A Best–Worst Scaling (BWS) survey was completed by 333 Year 10 (age 14–17) students to investigate the relative importance of 21 factors thought to impact students’ subject-selection decisions. Students ranked enjoyment, interest and ability in a subject, and its perceived need in their future study or career plans as the most important factors in both choosing and rejecting subjects. They considered advice from teachers, parents or peers as relatively less important. These findings indicate that enhancing students’ enjoyment, interest, and perceptions of their ability in science, as well as increasing student perceptions of its value in a future career, may result in more students studying science at school.

Parlapiano, F., Alexeev, V. & Dungey, M. 2017, 'Exchange rate risk exposure and the value of European firms', European Journal of Finance, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 111-129.
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© 2015 Taylor & FrancisThis paper presents a new assessment of the exposure of European firms to exchange rate fluctuations which takes into account the potential common drivers of exchange rates and equity market conditions. Using monthly data for European firms from 1999 to 2011, we assess the impact of unexpected fluctuations in the USD, JPY, GBP and CHF against the Euro, and show that the proportion of firms subject to exchange rate risk is considerably larger when estimation accounts for potential common drivers and firm-specific factors than otherwise. Firm exposure to exchange rate risk is affected by the level of international involvement, industry, firm size and country of origin. European firms with largely domestic operations reveal the greatest vulnerability to unexpected exchange rate movements, suggesting an opportunity to improve risk management for these companies.

Parvin, S., Wang, P.Z. & Uddin, J. 2017, 'Assessing two consumer behavioural intention models in a service environment', Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29, no. 3.
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Paul, S.K., Sarker, R. & Essam, D. 2017, 'A quantitative model for disruption mitigation in a supply chain', European Journal of Operational Research, vol. 257, no. 3, pp. 881-895.
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© 2016 Elsevier B.V.In this paper, a three-stage supply chain network, with multiple manufacturing plants, distribution centers and retailers, is considered. For this supply chain system we develop three different approaches, (i) an ideal plan for an infinite planning horizon and an updated plan if there are any changes in the data, (ii) a predictive mitigation planning approach for managing predictive demand changes, which can be predicted in advance by using an appropriate tool, and (iii) a reactive mitigation plan, on a real-time basis, for managing sudden production disruptions, which cannot be predicted in advance. In predictive mitigation planning, we develop a fuzzy inference system (FIS) tool to predict the changes in future demand over the base forecast and the supply chain plan is revised accordingly well in advance. In reactive mitigation planning, we formulate a quantitative model for revising production and distribution plans, over a finite future planning period, while minimizing the total supply chain cost. We also consider a series of sudden disruptions, where a new disruption may or may not affect the recovery plans of earlier disruptions and which consequently require plans to be revised after the occurrence of each disruption on a real-time basis. An efficient heuristic, capable of dealing with sudden production disruptions on a real-time basis, is developed. We compare the heuristic results with those obtained from the LINGO optimization software for a good number of randomly generated test problems. Also, some numerical examples are presented to explain both the usefulness and advantages of the proposed approaches.

Perey, R., Agarwal, R., Benn, S. & Edwards, M. 2017, 'The Place of Waste: Changing business value for the circular economy', Business Strategy and the Environment, no. Special issue.

Pina e Cunha, M., Giustiniano, L., Rego, A. & Clegg, S. 2017, 'Mission impossible? The paradoxes of stretch goal setting', Management Learning.
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Pollack, J., Biesenthal, C., Sankaran, S. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Classics in megaproject management: A structured analysis of three major works', International Journal of Project Management, no. 2017.
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Porter, D., wearing, S., McCauley, B., Wearing, M. & Foley, C.T. 2017, 'Exploring Male Adolescent Video Gaming as Leisure Consumption: It’s not as simple as ‘Bang Bang: You’re dead!’', Leisure Studies.

Pullen, A., Rhodes, C. & Thanem, T. 2017, 'Affective politics in gendered organizations: Affirmative notes on becoming-woman', Organization, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 105-123.
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© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.Current approaches to the study of affective relations are over-determined in a way that ignores their radicality, yet abstracted to such an extent that the corporeality and differentially lived experience of power and resistance is neglected. To radicalize the potential of everyday affects, this article calls for an intensification of corporeality in affect research. We do this by exploring the affective trajectory of ‘becoming-woman’ introduced by Deleuze and Guattari. Becoming-woman is a process of gendered deterritorialization and a specific variation on becoming-minoritarian. Rather than a reference to empirical women, becoming-woman is a necessary force of critique against the phallogocentric powers that shape and constrain working lives in gendered organizations. While extant research on gendered organizations tends to focus on the overwhelming power of oppressive gender structures, engaging with becoming-woman releases affective flows and possibilities that contest and transgress the increasingly subtle and confusing ways in which gendered organization affects people at work. Through becoming-woman, an affective and affirmative politics capable of resisting the effects of gendered organization becomes possible. This serves to further challenge gendered oppression in organizations and to affirm a life beyond the harsh limits that gender can impose.

Reeve, R., Srasuebkul, P., Langton, J., Haas, M.R., Viney, R. & Pearson, S.-.A. 2017, 'Health care use and costs at the end of life: A comparison of elderly Australian decedents with and without a cancer history', BMC Palliative Care.

Rego, A., Cunha, M.P. & Simpson, A.V. 2017, 'The perceived impact of leaders humility on team effectiveness: An empirical study', Journal of Business Ethics, vol. published online ahead of print, pp. 1-14.
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Reis, A., Frawley, S.M., Hodgetts, D., Thomson, A. & Hughes, K. 2017, 'Sport Participation Legacy and the Olympic Games: The Case of Sydney 2000, London 2012 and Rio 2016', Event Management, pp. 1-52.
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Rhodes, C. 2017, 'Ethical Praxis and the Business Case for LGBT Diversity: Political Insights from Judith Butler and Emmanuel Levinas', Gender, Work and Organization.
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© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.This paper critically reconsiders debates about the business case for workplace diversity as exemplified in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) activism. These debates have long suggested that there is an oppositional distinction between justifying diversity on self-interested business grounds and justifying it on the grounds of ethics, equality and social justice. This has led to an impasse between ethically driven diversity theory and activism, and the dominant business case approach commonly deferred to in managerial practice. As a way of mediating this impasse the contribution of this paper is to demonstrate how 'ethical praxis' can be deployed both despite and because of non-ethically motivated approaches to ethics in business. Drawing on Judith Butler's and Emmanuel Levinas's considerations of the relationship between ethics and the practice of justice, it is argued that critiques of the business case for diversity rely on a pure ethics that does not adequately recognize its connection to lived politics. Conversely, support for the business case evinces a politics that has failed to remember its origin in ethics. The paper positions ethical praxis as a political intervention undertaken in the name of ethics and uses this to suggest that the business case, despite its ethical poverty, holds potential to create real opportunities for justice in organizations.

Rosato, A. 2017, 'Sequential negotiations with loss-averse buyers', European Economic Review, vol. 91, pp. 290-304.
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© 2016 Elsevier B.V.This paper analyzes sequential negotiations with exogenous breakdown risk between a risk-neutral seller and a loss-averse buyer who is privately informed about his valuation. I show that, compared to the risk-neutral benchmark, loss aversion on the buyer's side softens the rent-efficiency trade-off for the seller. The reason is that the higher the buyer's valuation is, the more he has to lose by rejecting the seller's offer. Thus, in equilibrium the seller's profits and overall efficiency are both higher than in the risk-neutral case. Moreover, I also show that loss aversion has a redistributive effect by increasing the equilibrium payoff of some low-valuation buyers and decreasing that of high-valuation ones.

Rudkin, S.T., Chen, Y. & He, M. 2017, 'Understanding Chinese Provincial Real Estate Investment: A Global VAR Perspective', Economic Modelling.
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Russell, G., Burke, P.F., Waller, D.S. & Wei, X. 2017, 'The impact of front-of-pack marketing attributes versus nutrition and health information on parents' food choices', Appetite.
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Front-of-pack attributes have the potential to affect parents' food choices on behalf of their children and form one avenue through which strategies to address the obesogenic environment can be developed. Previous work has focused on the isolated effects of nutrition and health information (e.g. labeling systems, health claims), and how parents trade off this information against co-occurring marketing features (e.g. product imagery, cartoons) is unclear. A Discrete Choice Experiment was utilized to understand how front-of-pack nutrition, health and marketing attributes, as well as pricing, influenced parents' choices of cereal for their child. Packages varied with respect to the two elements of the Australian Health Star Rating system (stars and nutrient facts panel), along with written claims, product visuals, additional visuals, and price. A total of 520 parents (53% male) with a child aged between five and eleven years were recruited via an online panel company and completed the survey. Product visuals, followed by star ratings, were found to be the most significant attributes in driving choice, while written claims and other visuals were the least significant. Use of the Health Star Rating (HSR) system and other features were related to the child's fussiness level and parents' concerns about their child's weight with parents of fussy children, in particular, being less influenced by the HSR star information and price. The findings suggest that front-of-pack health labeling systems can affect choice when parents trade this information off against marketing attributes, yet some marketing attributes can be more influential, and not all parents utilize this information in the same way.

Sarkar, S., Osiyevskyy, O. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'A Goliath’s Fight Back: The Cognitive Drivers of Incumbent’s Capability Enhancement in Response to Radical Innovations'.

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P., Buchanan, J., Varadharajan, M. & Burke, P. 2017, 'The experiences of early career teachers: new initiatives and old problems', Professional Development in Education, vol. Online.
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The task of supporting beginning teachers has received considerable attention in recent years, and numerous initiatives have been implemented. In this article we investigate the experiences of early career teachers (ECTs) in New South Wales, Australia, at a time when their employing authority mandated the provision of mentors and a reduction in face-to-face teaching for ECTs. The article draws on ECTs’ responses to survey items asking about their experiences as an ECT. It emerged that many of the issues of the early years that have caused problems for ECTs remain intractable, or at least unresolved for some. The research indicates that despite support that has been mandated by some employers, we cannot be complacent about the transition of ECTs into the profession. There remains a need to address the elements of school environments that impact on ECTs’ experiences.

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P., Buchanan, J., Varadharajan, M. & Burke, P. 2017, 'The experiences of early career teachers: new initiatives and old problems', Professional Development in Education, no. Online.
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The task of supporting beginning teachers has received considerable attention in recent years, and numerous initiatives have been implemented. In this article we investigate the experiences of early career teachers (ECTs) in New South Wales, Australia, at a time when their employing authority mandated the provision of mentors and a reduction in face-to-face teaching for ECTs. The article draws on ECTs’ responses to survey items asking about their experiences as an ECT. It emerged that many of the issues of the early years that have caused problems for ECTs remain intractable, or at least unresolved for some. The research indicates that despite support that has been mandated by some employers, we cannot be complacent about the transition of ECTs into the profession. There remains a need to address the elements of school environments that impact on ECTs’ experiences.

Schulenkorf, N. & Schlenker, K. 2017, 'Leveraging Sport Events to Maximize Community Benefits in Low- and Middle-Income Countries', Event Management, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 217-231.
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Shah, K., Mulhern, B., Longworth, L. & Janssen, M.F. 2017, 'Views of the UK general public on important aspects of health not captured by EQ-5D', The Patient: Patient Centered Outcomes Research.
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Sivabalan, P. & Bisbe, J. 2017, '(Forthcoming) Management control and trust in virtual settings: A case study of a virtual new product development team', Management Accounting Research.
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Small, J.J. 2017, 'Women's "beach body" in Australian women's magazines', Annals of Tourism Research, vol. 63, no. March, pp. 23-33.
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Small, J.J., Harris, C. & Wilson, E. 2017, 'Gender on the Agenda? The Position of Gender in Tourism’s High Ranking Journals', Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, vol. 31, no. June, pp. 114-117.
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Suzuki, T. 2017, 'Directives, expressives, and motivation', Theoretical Economics, vol. 12, no. 1.
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When an agent's motivation is sensitive to how his supervisor thinks about the agent's competence, the supervisor has to take into account both informational and expressive contents of her message to the agent. This paper shows that the supervisor can credibly express her trust in the agent's ability only by being unclear about what to do. Suggesting what to do, i.e., "directives," could reveal the supervisor's "distrust" and reduce the agent's equilibrium effort level even though it provides useful information about the decision environment. There is also an equilibrium in which directives are neutral in expressive content. However, it is shown that neologism proofness favors equilibria in which directives are double-edged swords.

Thomas, A.A., Pearce, A., Sharp, L., Gardiner, R.A., Chambers, S., Aitken, J., Molcho, M. & Baade, P. 2017, 'Socioeconomic disadvantage but not remoteness affects short-term survival in prostate cancer: A population-based study using competing risks', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. e31-e40.
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Toubiana, M. & Zietsma, C. 2017, 'The Message is on the Wall? Emotions, Social Media and the Dynamics of Institutional Complexity', Academy of Management Journal.
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In this paper we explore how emotions influence organizations in situations of institutional complexity. In particular we study members’ and leaders’ emotive responses and influence activities in response to a disruptive event that led to a violation of expectations. Our findings show that when people’s expectations of an organization’s actions are violated it can trigger a process of emotional escalation that leads to the destabilization of the organization through the emotional-laden influence activities of shaming and shunning. The violation in our case resulted in strong negative emotions expressed on Facebook. Facebook acted as an emotional echo chamber where negative emotions were amplified and led to members’ emotion-driven influence activities eventually triggering regret and adaptation by the organization. We discuss implications for the study of emotions in institutional dynamics

Tse, H.P. 2017, 'Getting the basics right: Factors shaping student performance in intermediate economics', Economic Analysis and Policy, vol. 53, no. March 2017, pp. 1-8.
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This article examines the determinants of student performance in a second-year undergraduate economics course at a major Australian university - the University of Technology, Sydney. This article contributes to the literature by focusing on economics teaching in second-year, which is an area that has received little scholarly interest. The ultimately providing a usable sample group of 122 students. Out of a wide range of variables, two strong determinants of performance emerged: namely, students' pre-course aptitude and hours spent in paid employment. Based on these findings suggestions for increasing student performance in second-year economics are provided.

Van Essen, M. & Wooders, J. 2017, 'Dissolving a Partnership Securely'.

Van Iterson, A., Clegg, S.R. & Carlsen, A. 2017, 'Ideas Are Feelings First: On Epiphanies In Everyday Workplace Creativity', M@n@gement.

Veal, A.J. 2017, 'The serious leisure perspective and the experience of leisure', Leisure Sciences: an interdisciplinary journal, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 205-223.
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The serious leisure perspective (SLP), which divides leisure activities into three distinct forms, serious, casual and project-based, has been developed by Robert Stebbins over the last 40 years. This paper evaluates the perspective as theory and as a typology. The theory associated with the SLP, concerning social worlds, identification and optimal leisure lifestyles, is found to be generally untested because it has been largely developed in relation to the serious leisure form only. The validity of the typology is questioned on the grounds that ‘seriousness’ is a continuum, rather than discrete categories, and that most leisure activities can be engaged in with varying degrees of seriousness. It is proposed that the SLP be replaced by a more flexible, open research approach, the Leisure Experience Perspective, which consolidates features of the SLP and other research traditions and a number of other theoretical perspectives.

Veal, A.J. & Nichols, G. 2017, 'Volunteering and income inequality: cross-national relationships', Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 379-399.
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Wilkinson and Pickett, in their 2009 book The Spirit Level, found that, in rich countries, income inequality was negatively associated with a range of indicators of well-being, but they did not consider the relationship with volunteering. This paper seeks to fill that gap. Using existing data sources, it shows that, among European countries, higher levels of volunteering are associated with lower levels of income inequality. The relationship is particularly strong for regular and sport-related volunteering. The basic Spirit Level thesis is therefore confirmed as applicable to volunteering. However, while the thesis involves just one theoretical explanation for the income inequality/well-being relationship, namely status anxiety, in the case of volunteering, other variables are also found to be at play, including government social spending, available leisure time and geo-historical traditions. It is concluded that, while high levels of volunteering, as a form of social capital, can be seen as one of a number of features of more equal societies, disentangling cause and effect may require a more holistic approach to understanding its contribution to the generation and sustaining of social well-being.

Villesèche, F. & Josserand, E.L. 2017, 'Formal Women-Only Networks: Literature review and propositions', Personnel Review.
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The purpose of this paper is to review the emerging literature on formal women-only business networks and outline propositions to develop this under-theorised area of knowledge and stimulate future research. We review the existing literature on formal internal and external women-only networks and use the broader social capital and network literature to frame our arguments and develop propositions. Propositions are developed regarding how both internal and external formal women-only business networks can be of value for members, firms/organisations and the wider social group of women in business. We focus on the distinction between external and internal formal women-only networks while also acknowledging the broader diversity that can characterise such networks. Our review provides the reader with an insight into the state of the art and a set of propositions that present opportunities for future research. The paper provides insights into how women in business, organisations and wider society can leverage value from both internal and external formal women-only business networks. The paper sheds light on the under-studied and under-theorised phenomenon of formal women-only business networks. Beyond the individual member level, we suggest that such networks can be of value for organisations and the wider social group of women in management and leadership positions.

Wakefield, C., Fardell, J., Doolan, E., Drew, D., De Abreu Lourenco, R., Young, A. & Cohn, R. 2017, 'Grandparents of children with cancer: quality of life, medication and hospitalizations', Pediatric Blood and Cancer, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 163-171.
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Wakefield, J., Tyler, J., Dyson, L.E. & Frawley, J.K. 2017, 'Implications of student-generated screencasts on final examination performance', Accounting and Finance.
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© 2017 AFAANZ.While educational technologies can play a vital role in students' active participation in introductory accounting subjects, learning outcome implications are less clear. We believe this is the first accounting education study examining the implications of student-generated screencast assignments. We find benefits in developing the graduate attributes of communication, creativity and multimedia skills, consistent with calls by the profession. Additionally, we find improvement in final examination performance related to the assignment topic, notably in lower performing students. The screencast assignment was optional, and the findings suggest a tailored approach to assignment design related to students' developmental needs is appropriate.

Welty Peachey, J., Musser, A., Shin, N.R. & Cohen, A. 2017, 'Interrogating the motivations of sport for development and peace practitioners', International Review for the Sociology of Sport, pp. 101269021668685-101269021668685.
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Wong, C., Greene, J., Dolja-Gore, X. & van Gool, K. 2017, 'The rise and fall in out-of-pocket costs in Australia: An analysis of the Strengthening Medicare Reforms', Health Economics.
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Zietsma, C., Groenwegen, P., Logue, D.M. & Hinings, C.R. 2017, 'FIELD OR FIELDS? BUILDING THE SCAFFOLDING FOR CUMULATION OF RESEARCH ON INSTITUTIONAL FIELDS', The Academy of Management Annals, vol. 2017.
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The concept of an institutional field is one of the cornerstones of institutional theory, and yet the concept has been stretched both theoretically and empirically, making consolidation of findings across multiple studies more difficult. In this article, we review the literature and analyze empirical studies of institutional fields to build scaffolding for the cumulation of research on institutional fields. We classify two types of fields: exchange and issue fields, and describe the populations that inhabit them. Subsequently, we develop a typology of field conditions based on two dimensions: the extent of elaboration of institutional infrastructure and the extent to which there is an agreed upon prioritization of logics. We discuss the implications of field types and conditions for isomorphism, agency, and field change, identifying six pathways of field change and the factors affecting them. We outline a research agenda based on our analysis highlighting the need for consolidation of field studies and identify several outstanding issues that are in need of further research.

Conferences

Agarwal, U.A., Dixit, V., Jain, K., Sankaran, S., Nikolova, N., Müller, R. & Drouin, N. 2017, 'Exploring vertical and horizontal leadership in projects: A comparison of Indian and Australian', Accelerating Development: Harnessing the Power of Project Management, PMI India Research & Academic Conference, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, pp. 165-177.
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Project-based organisational forms are becoming more and more prevalent in many industries, and leadership influences projects' success ultimately impacting the organisational performance. Two types of leadership styles have been explored: vertical and horizontal. This study aims to identify the nature and balance of vertical and horizontal leadership in projects to allow project managers to consciously poly these approaches in different situations. A case study-based approach is adopted wherein, two case studies from India and three case studies from Australia are included . A comparative study of leadership styles is performed to find the best contextual fit for leadership styles. The findings reveal that that national cultural is not a major factor in influencing project leadership. Rather, organisational culture and a shared understanding on leadership practices is what influences whether vertical or horizontal leadership will be more prevalent. Senior leaders' initiatives to create and support a culture of sharing ideasand decisions, backed by project manager's approach enable effective balance between horizontal and vertical leadership. Horizontal leadership is further by regular meetings and social interactions. Prevalence of horizontal leaderships is demonstrated in technical decisions, as team members have the best expertise to address technical issues. In contrast, strategic decisions are normally discussed with the project manager and often escalated to senior leaders for decisions.

Bedford, D.S., Bisbe, J. & Sweeney, B. 2016, 'How Performance Measurement Systems help firms achieve Intended Ambidexterity: The role of Cognitive Conflict', Quantitative Empirical Research on Management Accounting, Shanghai.

Brazier, J. & Mulhern, B. 2017, 'Utility measures - Short Course', International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research 22nd Anual International Meeting, Boston, USA.

Campbell, D., Scarpa, R., Rose, J. & Hess, S. 2009, 'Using finite mixture models to accomodate outliers in discrete choice modelling.', http://www.icmconference.org.uk/index.php/icmc/icmc2009/paper/viewFile/105/62, International Choice Modelling Conference, Yorkshire, United Kingdom.

Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Liquefying modernity: Zygmunt Bauman as organization theorist', University of Umea.

Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'The East India Company', University of Newcastle Business School, Newcastle, United Kingdom.

De Abreu Lourenco, R. 2017, 'Estimating non (meta) health effects', ISPOR-AC Workshop, Sydney.

ferguson, A.F., lam, P.L. & Ma, N. 2017, 'Market Reactions to Auditor Switches under a Regulatory Consent Regime: Evidence from Australia', 2017 UTS AUSTRALIAN SUMMER ACCOUNTING CONFERENCE, Sydney, Australia.

Grosse, M.J., Ma, N. & Scott, T. 2017, 'Evidence on compensation consultant fees and CEO pay in amandatory disclosure setting', Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics Annual Symposium 2017, Taiwan.

Harvey, C., Maclean, K.M. & Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Organization Theory in Business and Management History: Present Status and Future Prospects', Business History Seminar, University of Newcastle Business School, Newcastle, UK.

Hassanli, N. & Ashwell, J. 2017, '“WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER”: IMPROVING THE SUSTAINABILITY PRACTICES OF HOLIDAY HOMES THROUGH CLUSTERING', 978-0-473-38824-9, The Council for Australasian Tourism and Hospitality Education, Department of Tourism, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
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Hermens, A., Pitelis, C. & Hermens, H. 2016, 'Industry 4.0 and Value Chain Collaboration: Manufacturing digitalization and operational tensions.', https://www.anzam.org/e vents/2016-operations-supply-chain-and-services-management-symposium-uts-sydney- 13-15-june-2016/, ANZAM, Sydney, pp. 1-25.
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This case study investigates the evolution of inter- firm collaboration process, from imagining a turnaround strategy to leading a manufacturing evolution. The research question focuses on ‘how should a medium-sized family owned manufacturing company change from a traditional foundry to adopt advanced digital manufacturing technologies?’ Economic organizations are the outcome of appropriability-informed purposive entrepreneurial action that involves the creation and co-creation of organizations, markets and supporting ecosystems. Our research studies suggest that overall tension levels and sub-systemic dialectic tensions (i.e. short-term versus long-term; flexibility versus rigidity; collaboration versus competition; common versus private benefits) evolve over time and reconstitute relationships and shape the evolutionary trajectory of an interfirm collaborative strategy. These findings suggest a process of accelerating tensions and significant imbalances in their configuration will favor certain outcomes. The main contribution of this research is to extend current theory by examining converging and diverging forces/tensions and their impact on inter firm value creation. The governance process of resources, in the context of the value creation process and perceived risk, is a key strategic element that influences internal tensions and organizational evolution.

Hutcheson, T.J. & Newell, G. 2017, 'Property Investment Decision-Making by Superannuation Funds', Pacific Rim Real Estate Society 23rd Annual Conference, Sydney, Australia.

Mulhern, B., Norman, R., De Abreu Lourenco, R. & Viney, R. 2017, 'Investigating the relative value of health and social care related quality of life using discrete choice', International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research 22nd Annual International Meeting, Boston, USA.

Oppe, M., Janssen, M.F., Luo, N., Mulhern, B. & Craig, B. 2017, 'DS-WG research: Where we are, how we got there, and where we are going', EuroQol Academy, Noordwijk, Netherlands.

Ossimitz, Wieder, B., Chapman, P. & Thirathon 2017, 'Management Accounting in the Big Data Era – Opportunities or Threats?', TBA, International Conference on Enterprise Systems, Accounting and Logistics, Thessaloniki, Greece.
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Over the past two decades, the digital revolution has brought along (a) ‘Big Data’, i.e. data which have rapidly become too big in volume, too diverse in nature and too rapidly changing to be handled in conventional databases and analysed using conventional tools, and (b) ‘data science’, “the study of the generalizable extraction of knowledge from data” (Dhar 2013), which develops and applies tools to manage and analyse (Big) Data. Data scientists are seen as new breed of managerial decision supporters, and insofar cross traditional management accounting territory. The aim of this study is to investigate the current and predict the future relationships between management accounting and the emerging data science discipline, based on a systematic analysis of the academic and practitioner literatures. While there is very little empirical evidence of an actual impact of data science on the management accounting profession, such impacts are predicted for the near future. Management accountants are expected to break with their traditions and collaborate with data scientists for mutual benefits. On the one hand, management accountants can be ‘data businesspeople’ or ‘horizontal data scientists’, who contribute essential business knowledge and data understanding to data science/Big Data projects. To succeed in such efforts, established and graduating management accountants face a need for up-skilling in technology, statistics, data mining, etc. and move into deeper analysis. Data scientists, on the other hand, can use their technical expertise to enrich established management accounting techniques and practices (e.g. the Balanced Scorecard, forecasting, etc.) with more advanced statistical or machine learning techniques.

Stavrunova, O., Johar, M. & Popovski, D. 2016, 'Weather Disasters and Mental Health: The Case of Damage to Housing', European Conference on Health Economics [ECHE], Hamburg.

Stavrunova, O., Johar, M. & Popovski, D. 2017, 'Weather Disasters and Mental Health: The Case of Damage to Housing', 8th Workshop on Economics of Health and Wellbeing, Melbourne.

Stein, J.A., Simpson, A.V., Berti, M. & Hermens, A. 2017, '‘Keeping the axe workshop going’: Australian manufacturing and the hidden maintenance of historical practices', The Maintainers II: Labor, Technology and Social Order, Stevens Institute of Technology.
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Thirathon, Wieder, B., Matolcsy & Ossimitz, M.L. 2017, 'Impact of Big Data Analytics on Decision Making and Performance', TBA, International Conference on Enterprise Systems, Accounting and Logistics, Thessaloniki, Greece.
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‘Big Data’ has become a major topic of interest and discussion for both academics and professionals in the IT and business disciplines, and case evidence suggests that companies engaging in Big Data outperform others. It has to be noted though that ‘Bigger’ Data as such does not provide any benefits, but it is rather how organisations make sense of data and gain insights from analysing the data. Analytic capabilities and practices are required to convert Big Data (BD) into insights which arguably improve decision-making and thereby organisational performance. While protagonists of such Big Data Analytics (BDA) imply that those effects exist, so far they have not been confirmed by rigorous empirical research. Data was obtained using a cross-sectional online survey which targeted Chief Information Officers and senior IT managers of medium-to-large Australian for-profit organisations and yielded 163 complete responses, which met the standard criteria for measurement reliability and validity. PLS-SEM and multiple bootstrapping methods were used to test the hypotheses, while controlling for firm size. The present study empirically confirms claims made in the literature that BD and related analytics lead to better performance. It also reveals that such benefits are achieved primarily because BDA creates additional incentives for managers to base their decisions on analytics, and that more analytic-based decision making actually leads to superior performance. Finally, the results of our study suggest that managers in organisations which engage in BD are generally more analytics-minded in their decision making, even if the analytic tools and methods used in support of their decisions are not particularly sophisticated. The results provide evidence that neither Big Data nor Big Data Analytics are just ‘hypes’, but they do actually lead to superior performance, partly directly and partly indirectly by creating an incentive for managers to rely on analytics when making str...

Viney, R., Stolk, E., Mulhern, B., Norman, R. & Rand Hendriksen, K. 2017, 'DCE valuation of the EQ-5D: Lessons learned and remaining challenges', EuroQol Academy, Noordwijk, Netherlands.

Werle, C., Dubelaar, C., Zlatevska, N. & Holden, S. 2017, 'Might bigger portions of healthier snack food help?', Society for Consumer Psychology Conference, San Francisco, USA.

Reports

Sangster, J., Furber, S., Allman-Farinelli, M., Phongsavan, P., Redfern, J., Haas, M.R., Church, J., Mark, A. & Bauman, A. NSW Ministry of Health 2017, A population-based lifestyle intervention to promote healthy weight and physical activity in people with cardiac disease: The PANACHE trial, Sydney.

Other

Aliyev, N. & He, X. 2017, 'Ambiguous market making', SSRN.

Clegg, S.R. 2017, 'Fatal Leadership Approaches', Manage Magazine.
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He, X., Li, K. & Shi, L. 2017, 'Social interactions, stochastic volatility, and momentum', SSRN.

Hommes, C.H. & Li, K. 2017, 'Production Delay and Belief Distributions in a Continuous-Time Cobweb Model'.

Kaine, S. & Josserand, E.L. 2017, 'Alt-unionism: why businesses may be better with the devil they know', The Conversation.

Mercer, P. 2017, 'The Australian company unlocking parking in city centres', BBC Global.

Mulhern, B., Feng, Y., Shah, K., van Hout, B., Janssen, M.F., Herdman, M. & Devlin, N. 2017, 'Comparing the UK EQ-5D-3L and the English EQ-5D-5L Value Sets', Office of Health Economics Research Paper 17/02.

Ng, E.P. 2017, 'testing'.

Okumu, C.O. 2017, 'Impact of Chinese Corporations' Investments in Sub Saharan Africa: Ethics, Responsibility and Sustainability'.
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This thesis investigated the social and economic impact of Chinese corporations investments in Sub Saharan Africa. The extent of technology transfer and local skill development is assessed. Related infrastructure developments are considered, and the question examined of whether this represents a balanced approach to sustainable development.

Waller, D.S. 2017, 'Adman: Andy Warhol’s origins as a commercial artist and illustrator', Sydney.
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Andy Warhol’s connection with brands began more than a decade before his iconic pop art images of Campbell’s soup and Coca-Cola. David Waller tells the story of Warhol’s beginnings in the advertising industry.

Waller, D.S. 2017, 'An adman’s perspective on Adman: Warhol Before Pop'.