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Publications

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Books

Aquino, K.A. 2017, Racism and Resistance among the Filipino Diaspora, Routledge, UK.

Kang, M. 2017, Francophonie en Orient, University of Chicago Press/ Amsterdam University Press.

Laurie, T. & Hickey-Moody, A. 2017, Masculinity After Deleuze, Bloomsbury Press (Forthcoming).
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Questions about masculinity frequently concern its origins: where does masculinity come from? Bodies or minds? Individuals or groups? Ideas or habits? In Masculinity After Deleuze, Hickey-Moody and Laurie argue that we urgently need to re-orient ourselves to what masculinity can become. Drawing on the post-structuralist philosophy of Gilles Deleuze, as well as his collaborations with Félix Guattari, the volume explores new directions in the articulation of masculine identities by considering work on feminism and pro-feminist men, performativity and affect, barebacking and online intimacy, the gendering of “care”, and the itinerant politics of transnational masculinities. Throughout, Masculinity After Deleuze weaves together a thread of Deleuzian concepts – including Royal Science, assemblage, territorialisation, actual/virtual, and minoritarianism – to provide a dynamic model of how masculinities may be changing in different social worlds. In doing so, Hickey-Moody and Laurie track important changes in the political terrain around masculinity, including the creation of gendered practices that actively reflect on – and in some cases undermine – the gains of feminist political activism. Deleuze and Guattari’s critiques of Marx and Freud take on a new life in this context. On the one hand, separations between work and non-work have become ever more entangled within diffuse practices of “care”, while on the other hand, subversive cries of queer desire are being reterritorialised by identitarian models of sexual citizenship. This book suggests that both situations call for a future-oriented masculinity studies, one concerned as much with the precarity of new practices, desires, and social frictions as with older, more familiar patterns of masculine behaviour.

Morita, K. 2017, Aikoku Fujinkai: Senji Taiseikano Aikoku Fujikai Shakai Katsudo[Series 4-7 Patriotic Ladies' Association, Patriotic Ladies Association under the Total War: Social Activities), Taiyo Shobo, Japan.

Nomnian, S. 2017, Thai Postgraduate Students' Positioning in Multilingual Classrooms.

Chapters

Adams, J., Sibbritt, D., Broom, A., Kroll, T., Prior, J., Dunston, R., Leung, B., Davidson, P. & Andrews, G. 2017, 'Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine as self-care in chronic illness' in Adams, J. & et al (eds), Public Health and Health Services Research in Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: International Perspectives, Imperial College Press, London.

Appleby, R.J. 2017, 'Dealing with controversial findings' in McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (eds), Doing Research in Applied Linguistics Realities, dilemmas, and solutions, Routledge, pp. 203-213.
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Featuring over twenty chapters by experienced and up-and-coming researchers from around the world, this book: outlines the steps involved in solving the problem and completing a successful, and publishable, project; provides case studies of ...

Browitt, J. 2017, 'The garage as vernacular museum: reading contemporary masculinity through ‘man caves’' in Lloyd, J. & Vasta, E. (eds), Reimagining Home in the 21st Century, Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK.
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Contemporary masculinity is constructed, performed and maintained through all kinds of symbolic practices and rituals. One recent kind of symbolic practice/expression is ‘man caves’ or ‘man spaces’, a certain kind of domestic space dedicated to and inhabited by primarily heterosexual men in spousal relationships: converted garages, basements, sheds, spare rooms and so forth. These spaces usually involve the storage of favourite objects, which can range from cars and car parts, motorcycles, tools, collectibles and, memorabilia, to musical and gym equipment, TVs/home theatres, alcohol paraphernalia, weapons, books, and so forth. Man caves function for building, repairing and maintaining ‘stuff’, but also as entertainment centres, as ‘toys’, as an escape into solitude or, conversely, as a place to entertain friends, as a place to express oneself in an-other way, a place to let one’s imagination run free. They are a key site for reading the performance of contemporary, urban masculinity. Within the confines of the domestic sphere, man caves promise of control over a space, its décor and the socialisation therein.

Buchanan, J., Major, J., Harbon, L. & Kearney, S. 2017, 'Preparing teachers through international experience: A collaborative critical analysis of four Australian programs' in Reid, C. & Major, J. (eds), Global Teaching: Southern Perspectives on Teachers Working with Diversity, Palgrave Macmillan.
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Ghosh, D. & Jain, A. 2017, 'Green marketing and green consciousness in India' in Green Asia: Ecocultures, sustainable lifestyles, and ethical consumption, Routledge.

Ghosh, D. & Jain, A. 2017, 'Green marketing and green consciousness in India' in Lewis, T. (ed), Green Asia: Ecocultures, sustainable lifestyles, and ethical consumption, Routledge.
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Giuffre, E. 2017, '"Introduction"' in Music in Comedy Television Notes on Laughs, Routledge, New York and London, pp. 1-14.
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From Sesame Street to Saturday Night Live, from Monty Python to Flight of the Conchords, this book offers the perfect introduction for students and scholars in music and media studies seeking to understand the role of music in comedy ...

Giuffre, E. 2017, 'Music in Comedy Television from the Composer's Perspective: Getting 'The Answers You're not looking for' in an Interview with David Schwartz' in Music in Comedy Television Notes on Laughs, Routledge, New York and London, pp. 105-116.
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From Sesame Street to Saturday Night Live, from Monty Python to Flight of the Conchords, this book offers the perfect introduction for students and scholars in music and media studies seeking to understand the role of music in comedy ...

Giuffre, E. & Romeo, D. 2017, 'And Now For Something Completely Different (Sounding): Monty Python's Musical Circus' in Music in Comedy Television Notes on Laughs, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 31-42.
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From Sesame Street to Saturday Night Live, from Monty Python to Flight of the Conchords, this book offers the perfect introduction for students and scholars in music and media studies seeking to understand the role of music in comedy ...

Hilton, A. 2017, 'Coming and staying or coming and going? Immigrant families in Denmark: Challenges and opportunities for integration' in Garvis, S. & Eriksen Odegaard, E. (eds), Nordic dialogues on children and families, Taylor and Francis.
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This chapter was inspired by personal experience and interactions with other newcomers to Denmark. It aims to provide insights into the challenges associated with moving to Denmark, some of which, such as limited employment possibilities or language barriers, are predictable. Others are less obvious, for example, perceptions of Danish society’s values and expectations of newcomers, social norms, and feelings of ‘outsiderness’. Circumstances may be further complicated for families with children and may vary among family members. This chapter presents case studies to shed light on families’ challenges and the factors than influence their decisions to stay or leave.

Hilton, A. & Hilton, G. 2017, 'Higher Order Thinking' in Pendergast, D.L., Main, K. & Bahr, N.M. (eds), Teaching Middle Years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, Australia, pp. 223-242.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Expertise, learning, and agency in partnership practices in services for families with young children' in Edwards, A. (ed), Working Relationally in and across Practices: A Cultural-Historical Approach to Collaboration, Cambridge University Press, 17, pp. 25-42.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice Architectures of Simulation Pedagogy: From Fidelity to Transformation' in Mahon, K., Francisco, S. & Kemmis, S. (eds), Exploring Education and Professional Practice: Through the Lens of Practice Architectures, Springer Press, Dordrecht, pp. 63-81.
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In this chapter, I put the theory of practice architectures to work in re-imagining simulation pedagogy in university-based professional education. I locate simulation within a broader landscape of links between higher education and the professions, before outlining key features of existing research on simulation in health professional education. This links to the empirical context underpinning the chapter: an observational study of simulation classes in an undergraduate nursing degree. I take up calls to enrich the theoretical basis for simulation pedagogy, and to shake off an attachment to the notion of ‘fidelity’. Weaving practice architecture theory with Baudrillard’s concepts of hyperreality and simulacra, I analyse three moments from observed simulation classes. I show how these are constituted as productive pedagogic moments, not through a logic of mirroring stable realities of practice, but through much more fluid play between real and imagined worlds. This provides a basis from which to pinpoint the transformative potential of simulation, avoiding the traps of conservatism that accompany a view that is too closely tied to a fixed, stable reality referent. This involves a shift from simulation (re)creating practice architectures and practices based on an ‘as if’ logic, to simulation based on a ‘what if’ notion, where cultural-discursive, material-economic, and socio-political arrangements of both real and imagined practices come together, interwoven with those of responsive, emergent pedagogy.

Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice, the Body and Pedagogy: Attuning as a Basis for Pedagogies of the Unknown' in Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education Praxis, Diversity and Contestation, Springer, pp. 87-106.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice, the body and pedagogy: attuning as a basis for pedagogies of the unknown' in Grootenboer, P., Edwards-Groves, C. & Choy, S. (eds), Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education Praxis, Diversity and Contestation, Springer, pp. 87-106.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice, the body and pedagogy: attuning as a basis for pedagogies of the unknown' in Grootenboer, P., Edwards-Groves, C. & Choy, S. (eds), Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education Praxis, Diversity and Contestation, Springer, Germany, pp. 87-106.
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Practice theories in education capture the diversity within and across sites and practices. The title of the book—Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education, captures the central overarching focus that underpins the chapters in  ...

Johnson, B. 2017, 'Sound Studies Today: Where are we going?' in Damousi, J. & Hamilton, P. (eds), A Cultural History of Sound, Memory and the Senses, Routledge.

Joseph, S.A. 2017, 'Dirt Cheap, down and out in Australia: Elisabeth Wynhausen lives and labours in anunderclass abyss'.
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American writer Jack London does it in the East End of London,1 inspiring George Orwell who reads London’s work as a teen, to add Paris (and some would comment Wigan Pier as well) to his own version.2 Latterly, Barbara Ehrenreich does it in the USA.3 And then, Elisabeth Wynhausen follows her lead in Australia. Leaving the confines of comfort and money to walk and work, reporting amongst those with neither much comfort nor money, Wynhausen writes in the wake of two historical and a critically received contemporary exemplar. This chapter examines and analyses her book length contribution Dirt Cheap: Life at the wrong end of the job market4 as a piece of Australian gonzo journalism – appropriating an autoethnographic practice to contextualise a ubiquitous global phenomenon: the huge chasm between people earning a living wage and those who live in close proximity to, or in poverty, daily. The late Wynhausen (1946-2013) spends nine months undercover in New South Wales and Victoria, negotiating low paid jobs in retail, hospitality, cleaning, aged care and manufacturing alongside those who do these jobs every day to pay for their mortgages, rent, children, food and bills. Her immersion and dialoguing throughout creates the profound, sometimes funny, sometimes furious and frustrated voice of her first person perspective, intermingled with until now, the unheard of voices of her working companions in each job. Fear and Loathing Worldwide: Gonzo Journalism Beyond Hunter S. Thompson suejoseph Page 2 Contextualising Wynhausen’s text within the processes and commentary of London, Orwell and Ehrenreich undertaking their own texts of the same ilk, this chapter argues that her autoethnographic rendering takes on a gonzo mantle because of her idiosyncratic voice and its socio-political impetus. As Australian author, journalist and commentator David Marr says: “…she was harsh and unsentimental -- and deeply compassionate, all at the same time. She was deeply, deeply concerned abou...

Laurie, T. & Hickey-Moody, A. 2017, 'Masculinity and Ridicule' in Papenburg, B. (ed), Gender: Laughter, Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks, Farmington Hills, MI, pp. 215-228.
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Exploring the social conditions that make men laugh at other men, this chapter considers the ways hegemonic masculinity is maintained through certain kinds of homosocial ridicule.

Maher, D. & Yoo, J. 2017, 'Project-Based Learning in the Primary School Classroom' in Progress in Education.
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Manidis, M. & Yasukawa, K. 2017, 'Developing Professionally: A Practice Based Perspective' in Leibowitz, B., Bozalek, V. & Kahn, P. (eds), Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education Realist, Socio-Material and Social Practice Approaches, Routledge, Oxon, pp. 93-109.
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This book will appeal to academics interested in how they come to learn to teach, to administrators and academic developers responsible for professional development strategies at universities and masters and PhD level students researching ...

otsuji & Pennycook, A.D. 2017, 'Cities, conviviality and double-edged language play' in Bell, N. (ed), Multiple perspectives on language play, De Gruyter Mouton, Berlin, pp. 199-218.

Pietsch, T. 2017, 'Geographies of Selection: Academic Appointments in the British Academic World, 1850-1939' in Jöns, H., Meusburger, P. & Heffernan, M. (eds), Mobilities of Knowledge, Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 157-183.

Prior, J., Dunston, R., Kroll, T., Adams, J. & Steel, A. 2017, 'Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine and global health challenges' in Adams, J. & et al (eds), Public Health and Health Services Research in Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: International Perspectives, Imperial College Press, London.

Sun, W. 2017, 'The greying of greenspeak? Environmental issues, media discourses, and consumer practices in China' in Lewis, T. (ed), Green Asia Ecocultures, Sustainable Lifestyles and Ethical Consumption, Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon, pp. 99-113.
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This book presents an analysis of a range of practices and activities from across Asia that demonstrate that people in Asia are alert to ecological concerns, that they are taking action to implement new styles of green living, and that Asia ...

Vanni Accarigi, I. 2017, 'Transcultural objects, transcultural homes' in Lloyd, J. & Vasta, E. (eds), Reimagining Home in the 21st Century., Elgar, Cheltenham, pp. 192-206.
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In a world increasingly characterized by mobility the idea of what constitutes home has changed dramatically. In its various meaning of family, unit of belonging, locality and even in its geopolitical sense as nation, home is now understood in a transnational and translocal sense. Building on this understanding, this chapter focuses on the concept of home as practiced. The idea of home is considered as a continuous process, which includes people, things, affects, senses, and which extricates the idea of home from the idea of place, of origin or of arrival. This chapter furthers the analysis of homing practices by analyzing the role of objects in the daily life of a group of professional migrant women. Together the stories of these objects generate the argument that ‘home’ is a process, or a set of processes, made of things, practices, language, memory, affects, sensoria and people. By taking four stories as its as its point of departure, this chapter argues that the sense of ‘being at home’ or of belonging to somewhere, in the context of transnational mobility is dissociated from a geographical location and replaced by belonging through everyday practices engender by specific objects.

Walker, J.R. & Cooper, M. 2017, 'Resilience' in Braidotti, R. (ed), The Posthumanities Reader, Bloomsbury, London.

Walker, J.R. & Cooper, M. 2017, 'Resilience' in Castree, N., Hulme, M. & Proctor, J. (eds), The Companion to Environmental Studies, Routledge, London.

Young, K.A. & Maher, D. 2017, 'The Use of Mobile Devices to Support Young People with Disabilities' in Stavros, A.V. (ed), Advances in Communications and Media Research, Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp. 101-126.
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Journal articles

1 Odoom, R., Boateng, H. & Omane, A.B. 2017, 'An Empirical Investigation of Perceived Relational Benefits and Brand Engagement in Restaurant Services', International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29, no. 11.

Barclay, K., Voyer, M., Mazur, N., Payne, A.M., Mauli, S., Kinch, J., Fabinyi, M. & Smith, G. 2017, 'The importance of qualitative social research for effective fisheries management', Fisheries Research, vol. 186, pp. 426-438.
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© 2016Over recent decades it has become widely accepted that managing fisheries resources means managing human behaviour, and so understanding social and economic dynamics is just as important as understanding species biology and ecology. Until recently, fisheries managers and researchers have struggled to develop effective methods and data for social and economic analysis that can integrate with the predominantly biological approaches to fisheries management. The field is now growing fast, however, and globally, researchers are developing and testing new methods. This paper uses three divergent case studies to demonstrate the value of using qualitative social science approaches to complement more conventional quantitative methods to improve the knowledge base for fisheries management. In all three cases, qualitative interview and document review methods enabled broad surveying to explore the research questions in particular contexts and identified where quantitative tools could be most usefully applied. In the first case (the contribution of commercial fisheries to coastal communities in eastern Australia), a wellbeing analysis identified the social benefits from particular fisheries, which can be used to identify the social impacts of different fisheries management policies. In the second case (a gender analysis of fisheries of small islands in the Pacific), analysis outlined opportunities and constraints along fisheries supply chains, illuminated factors inhibiting community development and identified ecological factors that are typically overlooked in conventional fisheries management. In the third case (sea cucumber fisheries in Papua New Guinea), an interactive governance analysis assessed how well fisheries management tools fit the ecological, social and economic reality of the fishery and the trade in its products, including market influences and stakeholder values. The qualitative approach adopted in these three case studies adds a new dimension to under...

Black, S.R. & Bee, B. 2017, 'Adult literacy provision and social class: Australian contexts', Studies in the Education of Adults, vol. online.
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Adult literacy provision began in Australia during a radical education era in the 1970s, and yet in recent decades, social class as a construct has been largely absent in the academic literature on adult literacy. We argue however that social class is essential to understanding adult literacy provision and furthermore that working class people have not been well served by this provision since the time literacy assumed enhanced status as human capital from the 1990s. We make our case through asking and responding to questions relating to the social class backgrounds of students and their teachers, how people are assessed to need literacy, what is taught, who undertakes research and who influences adult literacy policy. At the macro, structural level of analysis, we discuss the influence on adult literacy provision of the ruling class agendas of international agencies (i.e. the OECD) and national agencies representing capital. At the meso level, we discuss how the main adult literacy provider, technical and further education (TAFE) has failed to meet the adult literacy needs of working class students due to neo-liberal reforms. And at the micro, classroom level, we discuss some implications of class disparities between adult literacy teachers and their students.

Boateng, H. 2017, 'Customer Knowledge Management on Social Media Platform: A case study of MTN Ghana and Vodafone Ghana', Information Development: the international journal for librarians, archivists and information specialists, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 440-451.

Boateng, H., Agyemang, F.G., Okoe, A.F. & Mensah, T.D. 2017, 'Examining the relationship between trustworthiness and students’ attitudes toward knowledge sharing', Library Review, vol. 66, no. 1/2, pp. 16-27.
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Boateng, H., Okoe, A.F. & Tiniwah, M.D. 2017, 'The Relationship between Human Resource Practices and Knowledge Sharing in service firms', Business Information Review, vol. 33, no. 2.

Byron, P. 2017, 'Friendship, sexual intimacy and young people’s negotiations of sexual health', Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 486-500.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This paper examines how young people’s friendships influence safer sexual practices. Through a thematic discourse analysis, interviews with Sydney-based young people (aged 18–25 years) and Australian-based sexual health websites for young people are considered. Interview data illustrate how friendships can support young people's sexual experiences, concerns and safeties beyond the practice of ‘safe sex’ (condom use). This is evident in friends’ practices of sex and relationship advice, open dialogue, trust and sharing experiential knowledge, as well as friend-based sex. Meanwhile, friendship discourse from selected Australian sexual health websites fails to engage with the support offered by friendship, or its value to a sexual health agenda. Foucault’s account of friendship as a space of self-invention is considered in light of these data, along with his argument that friendship poses a threat to formal systems of knowing and regulating sex. Whether sexual or not, many close friendships are sexually intimate given the knowledge, support and influence these offer to one’s sexual practices and relations. This paper argues that greater attention to friendship among sexual health promoters and researchers would improve professional engagements with young people’s contemporary sexual cultures, and better inform their attempts to engage young people through social media.

Byron, P. 2017, 'The intimacies of young people’s sexual health and pleasure', Journal of Youth Studies, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 332-348.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This paper considers the discourse of intimacy in young people’s accounts of sexual health. In interviews with people from Sydney aged 18–25 years, diverse understandings of sexual safeties are offered, reflecting a range of sex partner intimacies. This is seen in participants’ accounts of having a range of different partners, having different experiences with a particular partner, and having sex with friends. This discourse is considered against Australian sexual health websites for young people. In the websites, connections between safeties and intimacies are not explored, and discussion of safety is limited to condom use, as per the concept of ‘safe sex’. How condom use is supported and/or challenged by sexual and friendship intimacies is overlooked. In considering research claims about the missing discourse of pleasure in formal approaches to young people’s sexual health, I extend this to a missing discourse of intimacy. Connections between pleasure, intimacy, safety, and friendship are explored throughout this paper, and theorisations of intimacy as cultural, public, and intersubjective are considered, drawing upon the works of Lauren Berlant and Eva Illouz. It is argued that sexual health research and promotion that engages with young people’s conceptualisations of intimacy will better engage with young people’s sexual cultures, and hence be more relevant and useful to this population.

Byron, P. & Hunt, J. 2017, '‘That happened to me too’: young people’s informal knowledge of diverse genders and sexualities', Sex Education, pp. 1-14.
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© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis paper explores how young people of diverse genders and sexualities share information about sex, sexualities and genders. Formal approaches to education often fail to consider young people’s communication and information exchange practices, including the circulation of peer knowledge through social media. In the wake of recent Australian backlash against the Safe Schools Coalition, we can observe how homophobia and queerphobia in the broader community can impact upon young peoples’ ability to learn about themselves and their bodies through formal education. Yet young people of diverse genders and sexualities can be observed to support each other in peer spaces, utilising their knowledge networks. This paper explores young people’s informal learning practices, the capacity of peer networks to support and educate young people, and the challenges of recognising such networks in a culture in which health and education discourses present them as ‘risk subjects’ rather than ‘health agents’. These issues are discussed in relation to our own experiences in research and health promotion, including one author’s role as a youth peer educator. Drawing on our workplace experiences, we provide a number of anecdotal examples which highlight the complexities of informal knowledge practice and information circulation, and the ways these can challenge and reform professional health, education, and research approaches.

Chan, L. 2017, 'Review of : "HIV/AIDS in China and India: Governing Health Security"', The China Journal, vol. 77.

Clark, A.H. 2017, 'The Place of Anzac in Australian Historical Consciousness', Australian Historical Studies, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 19-34.
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There is an ever-greater popular attachment to the commemoration of Anzac Day in Australia, with growing commercial, popular and institutional support around the country. This resurgence has also generated significant disagreement among historians, shaping the historiography of Anzac in recent years and raising important questions about Australia’s current obsession with Anzac: is it a reflection of increasing popular historical engagement, or an ideologically driven ‘mobilisation’ of the past? While various scholars have sought to unpack and understand this potent phenomenon of national sentiment, this article, based on a series of oral interviews with ordinary Australians in selected communities, reveals an uncertainty and complexity in many vernacular responses to Anzac that need to be included if that commemorative sentiment is to be properly understood.

Clerke, T., Hopwood, N., Chavasse, F., Fowler, C., Lee, S. & Rogers, J. 2017, 'Using professional expertise in partnership with families: a new model of capacity- building', Journal of Child and Family Health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 74-84.
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The first five years of parenting are critical to children’s development. Parents are known to respond best to interventions with a partnership-based approach, yet child and family health nurses (CFHNs) report some tension between employing their expertise and maintaining a partnership relationship. This article identifies ways in which CFHNs skilfully use their professional expertise, underpinned by helping qualities and interpersonal skills, to assist families build confidence and capacity, and thus buffer against threats to parent and child well-being. It reports on an Australian ethnographic study of services for families with young children. Fifty-two interactions were observed between CFHNs and families in day-stay and home visiting services in Sydney. A new model is presented, based on four partnership activities and the fluid movement between them, to show how CFHNs use their expertise to identify strengths and foster resilience in families in the longer term, without undermining the principles of partnership.

England, N. 2017, 'Developing an Interpretation of Collective Beliefs in Language Teacher Cognition Research', TESOL Quarterly, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 229-238.
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Gills, B.K., Goodman, J. & Hosseini, S.A.H. 2017, 'Theorizing alternatives to capital: Towards a critical cosmopolitanist framework1', European Journal of Social Theory.
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Henninger, M. 2017, 'Government information: Literacies, behaviors and practices', Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices, vol. 1, pp. 8-15.
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The current trend in the delivery of government information online is predicated on the belief that it will enable improvements in the provision of government services and citizens' participation in democratic processes. Government policy in this matter is wrapped in the rhetoric of public accessibility, that is, it must be easy to find, to access and to use. This paper draws upon a case study to explore the validity of this rhetoric; it uses Pierre Bourdieu's concept of society as a metaphorical game in which different players, government and citizens, play with different rules, a situation that can result in mismatches and conflicts in expectations and beliefs. Societal understanding of accessibility to government information is more nuanced and multidimensional than accessibility as an institutional practice within government departments, and requires high levels of digital and civic literacies. The case study findings demonstrate that accessibility did not meet the expectations of a group of university students who were both digitally and civically literate but were not able to find documents mandated to be published. The research concludes that there is a gap between the assumptions of the providers of government information and the expectations of their users; this disparity raises issues of social justice that will need to be bridged if government policies for online information delivery are to fulfil their objectives and rhetoric

Hood, S.E. 2017, 'The Significance of Presence in Building Disciplinary Knowledge', Onomazein: revista de linguistica, filologia y traduccion.

Hopwood, N. & Gottschalk, B. 2017, 'Double stimulation “in the wild”: Services for families with children at-risk', Learning, Culture and Social Interaction.
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Hunter, J.L. 2017, 'Case study: Technology-enhanced learning in High Possibility Classrooms in Australian schools', SAGE Research Methods Cases.
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Jeffreys, E. & Xu, J. 2017, 'Celebrity-inspired, Fan-driven: Doing Philanthropy through Social Media in Mainland China', Asian Studies Review, pp. 1-19.
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© 2017 Asian Studies Association of AustraliaThis paper provides the first detailed study of the links between celebrity-fan communication networks and philanthropy in the People’s Republic of China. It explains how the evolution of the Chinese Internet, and especially the rise of social media, has created new spaces in which fans of entertainment celebrities may be induced to engage with philanthropic causes. It then outlines the history of Chinese fan-driven philanthropic initiatives centred on people who became famous through reality-television popular music competitions. Finally, it offers a case study of the initiatives connected to popstar Li Yuchun, and examines the rationales provided by fans in online forums and interviews for their philanthropic engagement. Critics of celebrity-inspired philanthropy highlight its supposedly inauthentic and passive nature. Yet we find that fans actively exploit the forms of sociality that are provided by celebrity-fan communication networks, both to establish virtual participatory communities and to generate social action in the form of non-government-organised volunteering.

Joseph, S.A. 2017, 'The Essay as Polemical Performance: ‘salted genitalia’ and the ‘gender card’', TEXT.
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On October 9, 2012, the then Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard rose to her feet in Canberra’s Parliament House, and in response to a motion tabled by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, delivered her blistering Misogyny Speech. Although Gillard’s speech was met with cynicism by the Australian Press Gallery, some accusing her of playing the ‘gender card’, it reverberated around the world and when the international coverage poured back into the country, ordinary Australians stood up and listened. One of them was author, essayist, classical concert pianist and mother, Anna Goldsworthy. Shortly after the delivery of The Misogyny Speech, Quarterly Essay editor Chris Feik approached Goldsworthy to write the 50th essay for the Black Inc. publication, his idea to view it through a cultural lens. It took several months to research and compose, resulting in Unfinished Business: Sex, Freedom and Misogyny. The issue was launched at the Wheeler Centre in Melbourne on July 1, 2013, five days after Julia Gillard was deposed from her Prime Ministership. This paper takes a look back at the 50th issue of the Quarterly Essay, to discuss with its author her essay-writing process and the aftermath of publication. Goldsworthy is erudite as she looks at the construction of the essay, its contents and her love of essay writing. Although she confesses to not having a definition for the form, she believes it does not matter; that its fluidity is a basic constituent element. Her love of language and music inform both the breadth of her essay, as well as its narrative – there is lyricism to her sentences and a musicality to her structure. This paper also contextualises Unfinished Business as an example of the crucial long form essay contribution that Black Inc.’s Quarterly Essay performs in the Australian literary/ political/ cultural/ intellectual environment. There were critics of Goldsworthy’s essay, and these are assessed as a component of how ‘the essay’ can function in a liberal F...

Joseph, S.A. & Latona, F. 2017, 'Guiding life writers: The supervision of creative doctoral work interrogating personal trauma', New Writing: the international journal for the practice and theory of creative writing, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 23-35.
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There exists much literature on the student and doctoral candidate relationship across the disciplines. However, there is a gap in understanding this crucial dynamic in the context of creative practices, and an even more pronounced gap interrogating the supervisor to candidate dynamic when a student is conducting life writing involving personal trauma. Despite this, more and more universities are opening their doors to these types of research projects. In 2014, a final year doctoral candidate in life writing and her supervisor conducted a mini research project about their experience of supervision. The crux of their investigation hinged on the relatively nuanced requirements of supervision when the candidate is writing about personally traumatic themes in their dissertation. This paper is an extension of their original findings, amalgamating conclusions about what worked in the context of their relationship, given the delicate nature of the subject matter that they were investigating academically, and existing literature on the ethics of such supervision and theories of trauma writing in the context of life writing. By combining their analysis of their real experiences as supervisor and candidate, and preexisting academic thought on both the requirements of supervision and the differing needs of post-trauma students, the authors seek to contribute to the growing canon within the creative practices on supervisor/candidate relationships, as well as the relatively fraught ethics of the commodification of life experiences within tertiary institutions.

Joseph, S.A. & Rickett, C. 2017, 'Embedding, embellishing and embarrassing: Brian Williams ‘misremembers’', Ethical Space: the international journal of communication ethics, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 32-41.
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“It felt like a personal experience that someone else wanted to participate in and didn’t deserve to participate in.” Brian Williams enjoyed the trust of his organisation and audience for 10 years as NBC’s Nightly News anchor and Managing Editor. But on the night of January 30, 2015 during a broadcast, his high profile status began to unravel. Venerated as a reliable news source, Williams was forced to explain his legendary story of survival one day in the skies above the Iraq War. His version of an attack on a Chinook helicopter he was travelling in was circulated and valorised by his own corporation for 12 years. But when American soldier Lance Reynolds and other military challenged the veracity of his version of historical events, the corporation was forced to suspend him. Williams equates his rewriting and false reporting of this historical event as an act of ‘misremembering’. This assertion is a clear breach of how the Society of Professional Journalists missions its American members: ‘ethical journalism strives to ensure the free exchange of information that is accurate, fair and thorough. An ethical journalist acts with integrity’. NBC responded to this breach by suspending Williams for six months. However, the focus of this paper is audience response and the ways in which the production of new online texts, in the form of satirical memes, ubiquitously serves to critique and ridicule Williams’ claim of ‘misremembering’. And as such, the circulation of these online memes which re-appropriate historical moments, lend themselves in turn to the manufacture of parodic artefacts.

Joseph, S.A. & Rickett, C. 2017, 'The ethical supervision of long form writing: managing trauma narrative within the Australian tertiary sector', Ethical Space: the international journal of communication ethics.
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Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those who do not write, compose or paint can manage to escape the madness, the melancholia, the panic fear which is inherent in the human situation. Miller and Tougaw observe, “If every age has its symptoms, ours appears to be the age of trauma”. Their observation may help explain the emergence of memoir and autobiographical or autoethnographic creative works, not just commercially but also within the tertiary sector. Almost all of this work is appearing within journalism, English and creative writing schools as students turn to creative practice degrees as a means to write through traumatic events. The focus of this paper is to report on the findings of a qualitative research project where a range of Australian academics supervising trauma narrative HDR candidates were interviewed regarding what their needs are in relation to the ethical supervision of their candidates. This paper will also contribute to a better understanding of the supervisory relationship pertinent to candidates undertaking their own personal trauma narrative research and the ways in which academics can provide a safer space for both themselves and Research by Higher Degree students.

Kang, M. 2017, 'French publishing networks in Asia 1840-1940 (forthcoming)', Contemporary French & Francophone Studies.

Kang, M. 2017, 'Migration of French books in China', French Cultural Studies, pp. 1880-1930.

Laurie, T. 2017, 'Soundtracks of Asian America: Navigating Race through Musical Performance (Review)', IASPM@Journal, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 181-184.

Laurie, T. & Grealy, L. 2017, 'Higher Degree Research by Numbers: Beyond the Critique of Neo-liberalism', Higher Education Research and Development, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 458-471.
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This article argues that strong theories of neo-liberalism do not provide an adequate frame for understanding the ways that measurement practices come to be embedded in the life-worlds of those working in higher education. We argue that neo-liberal metrics need to be understood from the viewpoint of their social usage, alongside other practices of qualification and quantification. In particular, this article maps the specific variables attending measurement in Higher Degree Research (HDR) programs, as the key sites that familiarize students with measurement practices around research and teaching. With regard to the incremental reframing of doctoral study as a utilitarian pursuit, we suggest a need to better identify the singular and immeasurable features of long-term research projects, and argue for a revitalized notion of failure. In this context, this article suggests that many critiques of neo-liberalism do not sufficiently advance alternative ways to think about the purposes and limitations of higher education.

Laurie, T. & Khan, R. 2017, 'The Concept of Minority for the Study of Culture', Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 92-103.
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The title of this special issue and the conference that produced it, Minor Culture, could have been borrowed from many different intellectual traditions. However, if a decisive break must be identified in the meanings attached to ‘minor’, it remains Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature (1975, Kafka hereafter). The article therefore begins by examining Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of ‘minor literature’ as an anti-sociological reworking of minor and minority, although as we suggest, the French philosophers’ commentary does not proceed without its own embedded assumptions about social context(s). The article then turns toward those policy-driven sociological traditions that Deleuze and Guattari sought to escape, focusing on the North American sociology of the Chicago School. As part of this discussion, we also reflect on the construction of ‘minorities’ through social narratives about numbers, taking Australian immigration debates as an example. As a third key paradigm in the study of the ‘minor’, the article revisits cultural studies’ own embrace of the Popular as a site for political struggles over the meanings attached to ‘major’ and ‘minor’ social identities. Finally, we consider the range of transformative cultural practices addressed in this Minor Culture special issue, and reflect on the utility of the ‘minor’ in holding together disparate political projects.

Lindh Falk, A., Hopwood, N. & Abrandt Dahlgren, M. 2017, 'Unfolding Practices: A Sociomaterial View of Interprofessional Collaboration in Health Care', Professions and Professionalism, vol. 7, no. 2.
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Knowledge sharing is an essential part of interprofessional practice and will be even more important in the future in regard to the opportunities and challenges in practices for delivering safe and effective healthcare. The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore how professional knowledge can be shared in an interprofessional team at a spinal cord injury rehabilitation unit. A sociomaterial perspective on practice was used to analyse the data, and by theorizing upon this, we captured different aspects of interprofessional collaboration in health care. The findings illuminate how knowledge emerges and is shared between professionals, and how it passes along as chain of actions between professionals, in various ways. The findings offer a novel perspective on how interprofessional collaboration as a practice, involving ongoing learning, unfolds. This reveals the mechanisms by which different forms of expertise are mobilized between professions as health care work.

Macnamara, J.R. & Likely, F. 2017, 'Revisiting the disciplinary home of evaluation: New perspectives to inform PR evaluation standards', Research Journal of the Institute for Public Relations, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 1-21.
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From historical analysis of the early development of public relations evaluation (early 1980s to the early 2000s), this paper shows that public relations scholarship and practice have drawn heavily on media and communication studies in developing models and methods of evaluation, but have not significantly engaged with the large related body of knowledge on program evaluation. While communication and media studies are logical and formative disciplinary homes for public relations (PR), this paper argues that PR is a transdisciplinary field and that program evaluation is a mostly overlooked source of influence and heritage in relation to evaluation. This analysis presents evidence that a disciplinary ‘home visit’ to program evaluation, which nestles within program theory and theory of change, offers much to overcome the long-standing stasis in PR evaluation and to inform the search for standards.

Macnamara, J.R. & Zerfass, A. 2017, 'Evaluation stasis continues in PR and corporate communication: Asia Pacific insights into causes', Communication Research and Practice, pp. 1-16.
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The first comprehensive study of public relations (PR) and corporate communication practices across Asia-Pacific countries has found that, despite being an area of rapid growth, evaluation remains limited, is often not based on reliable research methods, and is focussed on outputs rather than the outcomes of communication. This reflects a worldwide stasis in evaluation of PR that has been identified as problematic by a number of authors. The Asia-Pacific Communication Monitor, a survey-based study conducted by a collaboration of 16 universities across 23 Asia-Pacific countries in 2015, also explored practitioners’ skills, and found a significant lag that could account for this stasis. This article reports key findings of this study that contribute insights to address the lack of measurement and evaluation in the growing field of PR that remains a major concern in the academy and industry.

Martin, G. 2017, 'Scaling critical pedagogy in higher education', Critical Studies in Education, no. 1, pp. 1-18.
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Across the globe, neoliberal reforms have produced effects in the higher education sector that are multiple, convergent and embodied or performed. In this context, a growing number of activist-scholars, from a range of disciplines, have explored the role of critical pedagogy within the space of the classroom. Yet, persistent critiques and challenges suggest that the field of critical pedagogy needs to build upon a richer set of theoretical and practical insights. While the discipline of geography has proven to be a generative source of learning and renewal, a recurring tendency exists within the educational literature to treat the key geographical concept of scale as a discrete, pre-given unit of analysis. Consequently, scale remains largely under-theorised and misunderstood leading to simplistic binary oppositions and choices. This binary filter underpins a comfortable but problematic ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ paradigm. Drawing upon contentious debates in the field of geography, this paper explores how the intersections between diverse spatial concepts, including scale, might be strategically deployed to rework the spatial imaginings of critical pedagogy.

McKee, A. 2017, 'Learning from commercial entertainment producers in order to create entertainment sex education', Sex Education: sexuality, society and learning, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 26-40.
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The Girlfriend Guide to Life was a commercial entertainment product co-edited by an entertainment producer and an academic researcher to reach 14–17-year olds with information they wanted to know about sexual health, in language, genres and designs that they wanted. Entertainment–Education is a familiar approach to distributing information, including information about sexual health, in non-formal learning contexts. However, previous accounts of Entertainment– Education have highlighted a tension between the audience-centred approach of entertainment production and the message-centred approach of education. Using a practice-led methodology and drawing on reflective practice, this article suggests that if educators go deeper than asking entertainment producers to simply make cosmetic changes to content, and accept that entertainment producers have a vital understanding of what target audiences need to know about sexual health, a reciprocal working relationship can be developed that overcomes some of the differences in habitus between entertainment producers and educators that have been identified by previous researchers.

Olsson, M.R. 2017, 'Being in place: embodied information practices', Information Research: an international electronic journal, vol. 22, no. 1.
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Introduction. The concept of embodied information practices and the implications for research and professional practice are examined drawing from the authors’ empirical studies of people engaged in professional and everyday practices. The authors suggest that information behaviour research’s focus on individual cognition has led our field to overlook the important role that embodied practices play in individual and collective sense-making. Method. Conceptual paper that draws from a number of qualitatively framed research projects, which explore the role of information practices in knowledge construction. Conclusions. Empirical studies which focus on non-linguistic and embodied practices may appear removed from the Library and Information Science agenda, however these should become increasingly routine, because they provide the research field with a source of information about how people engage with the non-normative aspects of everyday life and learn from others to inform their practices.

Palmer, T.-.A., Burke, P.F. & Aubusson, P. 2017, 'Why school students choose and reject science: a study of the factors that students consider when selecting subjects', International Journal of Science Education.
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Student study of science at school has been linked to the need to provide a scientifically capable workforce and a scientifically literate society. Educators, scientists, and policymakers are concerned that too few students are choosing science for study in their final years of school. How and why students choose and reject certain subjects, including science, at this time is unclear. A Best–Worst Scaling (BWS) survey was completed by 333 Year 10 (age 14–17) students to investigate the relative importance of 21 factors thought to impact students’ subject-selection decisions. Students ranked enjoyment, interest and ability in a subject, and its perceived need in their future study or career plans as the most important factors in both choosing and rejecting subjects. They considered advice from teachers, parents or peers as relatively less important. These findings indicate that enhancing students’ enjoyment, interest, and perceptions of their ability in science, as well as increasing student perceptions of its value in a future career, may result in more students studying science at school.

Pennycook, A.D. 2017, 'Translanguaging and semiotic assemblages', International Journal of Multilingualism.

Pennycook, A.D. & appleby, R. 2017, 'Swimming with Sharks, Ecological Feminism and Posthuman Language Politics', Critical Inquiry in Language Studies: an international journal.
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Prescott, A.E. & Maher, D. 2017, 'Professional development for rural and remote teachers using video conferencing', Asia-PacificJournal of Teacher Education.
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Teachers in rural and remote schools face many challenges including those relating to distance, isolation and lack of professional development opportunities. This article examines a project where mathematics and science teachers were provided with professional development opportunities via video conferencing to help them use syllabus documents to develop their teaching programs. The study is qualitative and draws on teacher conversations and surveys using a community of inquiry theoretical framework to analyse the data. The results demonstrate that teacher professional development via video conferencing has both strengths and weaknesses but can support teachers through collaboration to develop their expertise in writing teaching programs.

Pressick-Kilborn, K.J. & Prescott, A. 2017, 'Engaging primary children and pre-service teachers in a whole school 'Design and Make Day': The evaluation of a creative science and technology collaboration', Teaching Science, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 18-26.
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A pedagogical innovation was collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated in the context of a school-university partnership. The innovation had a dual purpose: 1) to provide an opportunity for primary pre-service teachers to develop their understanding and experience of teaching 'design and produce' processes (working technologically), and 2) to involve primary students in a highly engaging, meaningful learning experience with high visibility in the school's community. We decided that this could best take the form of an annual whole school 'Design and Make Day' (DM Day). In this paper, we describe the context of the DM Day, spotlight three tasks, and share the key findings from the project evaluation.

Rissel, C., Richters, J., de Visser, R.O., McKee, A., Yeung, A. & Caruana, T. 2017, 'A Profile of Pornography Users in Australia: Findings From the Second Australian Study of Health and Relationships', Journal of Sex Research, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 227-240.
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© 2016, Routledge. All rights reserved.There are societal concerns that looking at pornography has adverse consequences among those exposed. However, looking at sexually explicit material could have educative and relationship benefits. This article identifies factors associated with looking at pornography ever or within the past 12 months for men and women in Australia, and the extent to which reporting an “addiction” to pornography is associated with reported bad effects. Data from the Second Australian Study of Health and Relationships (ASHR2) were used: computer-assisted telephone interviews (CASIs) completed by a representative sample of 9,963 men and 10,131 women aged 16 to 69 years from all Australian states and territories, with an overall participation rate of 66%. Most men (84%) and half of the women (54%) had ever looked at pornographic material. Three-quarters of these men (76%) and more than one-third of these women (41%) had looked at pornographic material in the past year. Very few respondents reported that they were addicted to pornography (men 4%, women 1%), and of those who said they were addicted about half also reported that using pornography had had a bad effect on them. Looking at pornographic material appears to be reasonably common in Australia, with adverse effects reported by a small minority.

Rooney, D. 2017, '(Semi)Public Places, Practices and Pedagogy', Pedagogy Culture and Society.
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Rather than being banal and uninteresting, Western women’s public toilets may be seen as educational spaces. While prolific in number and usage, they have typically escaped research attention. This paper argues that the common inclusion of toilet texts in these places renders them not only interesting but also worthy of inclusion in accounts of public pedagogies. The paper draws attention to the pedagogical voices that occupy the ostensible privacy of places like toilets. It does so by discussing a collection of toilet texts using the entangled concepts of place, practice and pedagogy. Overall, the paper demonstrates how the texts act as proxy for absent pedagogues who seek to disseminate particular knowledges and/or promote specific cultural practices, and in doing so it repositions women’s (semi)public toilets as richly pedagogical.

Rooney, D.L. 2017, '(Semi)Public Places, practices and pedagogy', Pedagogy Culture and Society.
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Rather than being banal and uninteresting, Western women’ s public toilets may be seen as educational spaces. While prolific in number and usage, they have typically escaped research attention. This paper argues that the common inclusion of toilet texts in these places renders them not only interesting but also worthy of inclusion in accounts of public pedagogies. The paper draws attention to the pedagogical voices that occupy the ostensible privacy of places like toilets. It does so by discussing a collection of toilet texts using the entangled concepts of place, practice and pedagogy. Overall, the paper demonstrates how the texts act as proxy for absent pedagogues who seek to disseminate particular knowledges and/or promote specific cultural practices, and in doing so it repositions women’ s (semi)public toilets as richly pedagogical.

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P., Buchanan, J., Varadharajan, M. & Burke, P. 2017, 'The experiences of early career teachers: new initiatives and old problems', Professional Development in Education, vol. Online.
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The task of supporting beginning teachers has received considerable attention in recent years, and numerous initiatives have been implemented. In this article we investigate the experiences of early career teachers (ECTs) in New South Wales, Australia, at a time when their employing authority mandated the provision of mentors and a reduction in face-to-face teaching for ECTs. The article draws on ECTs’ responses to survey items asking about their experiences as an ECT. It emerged that many of the issues of the early years that have caused problems for ECTs remain intractable, or at least unresolved for some. The research indicates that despite support that has been mandated by some employers, we cannot be complacent about the transition of ECTs into the profession. There remains a need to address the elements of school environments that impact on ECTs’ experiences.

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P., Buchanan, J., Varadharajan, M. & Burke, P. 2017, 'The experiences of early career teachers: new initiatives and old problems', Professional Development in Education, no. Online.
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The task of supporting beginning teachers has received considerable attention in recent years, and numerous initiatives have been implemented. In this article we investigate the experiences of early career teachers (ECTs) in New South Wales, Australia, at a time when their employing authority mandated the provision of mentors and a reduction in face-to-face teaching for ECTs. The article draws on ECTs’ responses to survey items asking about their experiences as an ECT. It emerged that many of the issues of the early years that have caused problems for ECTs remain intractable, or at least unresolved for some. The research indicates that despite support that has been mandated by some employers, we cannot be complacent about the transition of ECTs into the profession. There remains a need to address the elements of school environments that impact on ECTs’ experiences.

Sun, W. & Yu, H. 2017, 'Digital/Social Media and the Chinese Community in Australia', Media Asia.
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Walker, J.R. & Granjou, C. 2017, 'The Faecal Frontier: Miniaturising the Biosphere and Managing Waste in Deep Space', Wildlife Australia, vol. 54, no. 2.

Walker, J.R., Granjou, C. & Salazar, J.F. 2017, 'The Politics of Anticipation: On Knowing and Governing Environmental Futures', Futures.
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In this article we describe how the historical emergence and rise of future studies, since the founding issue of Futures in 1968, has been intricately connected to the emergence and development of environmental anticipation as discourse and practice. We trace a dialectical and inter-twined relationship between technologies of environmental anticipation and forecasting, and technologies of anti-environmentalist anticipation and counter-intervention, one which we argue shapes not only the contemporary politics of anticipation, but in a very material sense, the future conditions of biological and social life on Earth. In so doing we want to address the possible contributions that the field of futures studies can make to to reimagining collective agency and ways of being on Earth, whilst reflecting critically upon its genealogical relations to the political reason and strategic horizons of powerful fossil fuel interests, from the crisis of the 1970s to the present. The article also introduces this special issue of Futures on “The Politics of Environmental Anticipation” with the aim to bring to the fore the role that social scientists play in environmental anticipation – ie. drawing attention to the fact that the future could always have been otherwise. As a whole, this stimulating collection of eight original articles provides a critical assessment of a range of sites where varied and conflicting politics of environmental anticipation are constituted and resisted.

Xu, J. 2017, 'Shanzhai Media Culture: Failed Intervention to the Disingenuous Neoliberal Logic of Chinese Media', Journal of Contemporary China, vol. 26, no. 104, pp. 249-262.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis article studies shanzhai media culture, a specific type of shanzhai culture that copycats the most-watched shows of China Central Television (CCTV) with a sense of satire and play. The article discusses why CCTV has become a popular target of shanzhai, how CCTV’s brand shows are shanzhai-ed and what are the political implications of shanzhaing these established programs. By presenting Lao Meng’s Shanzhai Spring Festival Gala as a case study, the author argues that shanzhai media culture is a creative, participatory and Internet-facilitated grassroots media production, which attempted to resist and intervene in the power–money hegemony of CCTV underpinned by the disingenuous neoliberal logic of Chinese media. However, this culture failed to do so and has been co-opted and reshaped by the powerful logic it attempted to challenge.

Conferences

Fiske, L.I. & Shackel, R. 2016, 'Effects of conflict-induced displacement on women in DRC, Kenya and Uganda', http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2016/11/families-on-the-move, UN Women. Families on the Move, New York University, Centre for Global Affairs, New York.
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Robert, J.L. 2016, 'A Vacation in a Bottle: Appeals to Travel in French Alcohol Advertising', Australian Society for French Studies, Adelaide.

Robert, J.L. 2016, 'Binge Sobriety in Cross-Cultural and Historical Perspective', Alcohol Flows Across Cultures, Oxford, UK.

Robert, J.L. 2015, 'La Bougeotte et l’errance: French Canadian Travels and Returns', Special Issue of Australian Journal of French Studies, Australian Society for French Studies, Newcastle, NSW.

Vatsikopoulos, H. 2016, 'The Role of the Media in Public Opinion and Social Cohesion', Australian Council of Social Services Council Conference 2016, Carriage works Redfern.

Non traditional outputs

Prince, M. 2017, 'test'.

Sazdov, R. 2017, 'Dreams of the Jailed Modernist', ZKM.

Vatsikopoulos, H. 2017, 'Exposure 04: Andrew Quilty - Australian Centre for Photography'.

Other

Chan, L. 2017, 'Power, Ideas and Institutions: China’s Emergent Footprints in Global Governance of Development Aid', CSGR Working Paper No. 281/17.
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Fiske, L.I. 2017, 'Refugee Transit in Indonesia: The Critical Importance of Community', Global Observatory.
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Western nations are in retreat from their traditional willingness to take in refugees. Opportunities for refuge are constricting globally, just as the need for them expands. Indonesia currently hosts around 15,000 refugees in transit. Three distinct refugee journeys are emerging, and community makes a world of difference to refugee transit.

Fiske, L.I. & Shackel, R. 2017, 'Internally displaced women: social rupture and political voice', Open Democracy.
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Displacement is social as well as geographical. Women’s welfare and survival depends significantly on their social relationships; displacement destroys this resource.

Prince, M.J. 2017, 'Opportunities of Impact'.

Robert, J.L. 2017, 'Interviewing to Ascertain the Effectiveness of Public Pedagogy in Public Health-Based Philanthropic Challenges', SAGE.
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Research sometimes leads you down unexpected paths. Although not trained as a public health researcher, a passing interest in a curious cultural phenomenon led me to conduct a cross-disciplinary study on a public health topic from an educational point of view. Being new to the field had me approach the background research without preconceptions and with a willingness to go where the literature pointed in terms of methodology. When it pointed toward semi-structured interviews, I quickly confronted the practicalities of using a method with which I was not familiar. The recruitment of participants, sampling bias, the phrasing of my questions, and the basic logistics of conducting interviews while away from one’s home base all presented challenges that needed to be overcome through anticipation, adjustment, or acceptance and acknowledgment of less than ideal circumstances and outcomes. This case presents new researchers with a set of circumstances and responses that can be analyzed in terms of successful and less than optimal responses and affords them the opportunity to think through better approaches to the practicalities of research methodology. It also provides encouragement to take risks in terms of research and research design, albeit with the proviso that such risks are calculated and the decisions informed.