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Books

Aquino, K.A. 2017, Racism and Resistance among the Filipino Diaspora, Routledge, UK.

Kang, M. 2017, Francophonie en Orient, University of Chicago Press/ Amsterdam University Press.

Laurie, T. & Hickey-Moody, A. 2017, Masculinity After Deleuze, Bloomsbury Press (Forthcoming).
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Questions about masculinity frequently concern its origins: where does masculinity come from? Bodies or minds? Individuals or groups? Ideas or habits? In Masculinity After Deleuze, Hickey-Moody and Laurie argue that we urgently need to re-orient ourselves to what masculinity can become. Drawing on the post-structuralist philosophy of Gilles Deleuze, as well as his collaborations with Félix Guattari, the volume explores new directions in the articulation of masculine identities by considering work on feminism and pro-feminist men, performativity and affect, barebacking and online intimacy, the gendering of “care”, and the itinerant politics of transnational masculinities. Throughout, Masculinity After Deleuze weaves together a thread of Deleuzian concepts – including Royal Science, assemblage, territorialisation, actual/virtual, and minoritarianism – to provide a dynamic model of how masculinities may be changing in different social worlds. In doing so, Hickey-Moody and Laurie track important changes in the political terrain around masculinity, including the creation of gendered practices that actively reflect on – and in some cases undermine – the gains of feminist political activism. Deleuze and Guattari’s critiques of Marx and Freud take on a new life in this context. On the one hand, separations between work and non-work have become ever more entangled within diffuse practices of “care”, while on the other hand, subversive cries of queer desire are being reterritorialised by identitarian models of sexual citizenship. This book suggests that both situations call for a future-oriented masculinity studies, one concerned as much with the precarity of new practices, desires, and social frictions as with older, more familiar patterns of masculine behaviour.

Macnamara, J.R. 2017, Evaluating Public Communication: Exploring New Models, Standards, and Best Practice, Routledge, Abingdon, UK.
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Evaluating Public Communication addresses the widely reported lack of rigorous outcome and impact oriented evaluation in advertising; public relations; corporate, government, political, and organizational communication; and specialist fields such as health communication. This transdisciplinary analysis integrates research literature from each of these fields of practice as well as primary research including interviews, content analysis, and ethnography inside the world of evaluating public communication to identify the latest models and approaches. It presents the most comprehensive analysis undertaken of evaluation of public communication including:   * A review of 30 frameworks and models that inform processes for evaluation in advertising, public relations, health communication, government communication and other specialist fields including the latest recommendations of industry bodies, evaluation councils, and research institutes in several countries such as the Association for Measurement & Evaluation of Communication (AMEC) Integrated Evaluation Framework; the UK Government Communication Service (GCS) Evaluation Framework; the European Commission Directorate-General for Communication evaluation framework; as well as the latest academic models and guidelines for evaluation of public communication; * Recommendations for standards based on contemporary social science research and industry initiatives such as the Task Force for Standardization of Communication Planning and Evaluation Models and the Coalition for Public Relations Research Standards; * A comprehensive review of metrics that can inform evaluation including digital and social media metrics, 10 informal research methods, and more than 30 formal research methods for evaluating public communication; and * A dozen award-winning case studies of evaluation of public communication campaigns and projects.

Morita, K. 2017, Aikoku Fujinkai: Senji Taiseikano Aikoku Fujikai Shakai Katsudo[Series 4-7 Patriotic Ladies' Association, Patriotic Ladies Association under the Total War: Social Activities), Taiyo Shobo, Japan.

Nomnian, S. 2017, Thai Postgraduate Students' Positioning in Multilingual Classrooms.

Yang, J. 2017, Informal payments and regulations in China’s healthcare system: Red packets and institutional reform, Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore.
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© The Author(s) 2017.This text addresses the key issue of informal payments, or ‘red packets’, in the Chinese Healthcare system. It considers how transactions take place at the clinical level as well as their regulation. Analysing the practice from the perspectives of institutions and power structure, it examines how institutional changes in the pre-reform and reform era have changed the power structure between medical professions, patients and the Party-state, and how these changes have given rise and perpetuate the practice. Drawing from qualitative data from interviews of medical professionals, the author recognises the medical profession as a major player in the health care system and presents their perception of the practice as the taker of ‘red packets’ and their interactions with the patient and the state surrounding the illegal practice in an authoritarian power structure. The books considers the institutional reasons that motivate doctors to take, patients to give, and the government to “tolerate” red packets, arguing that the bureaucratization of the medical profession, society of acquaintances and shortage of quality of medical services jointly create an institutional setting that has given rise to these informal payments. Contributing to a rounded understanding of the problems of healthcare reform in China, this book is a key read for all scholars interested in the issue of informal payments and healthcare politics in transition economies.

Chapters

Adams, J., Sibbritt, D., Broom, A., Kroll, T., Prior, J., Dunston, R., Leung, B., Davidson, P. & Andrews, G. 2017, 'Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine as self-care in chronic illness' in Adams, J. & et al (eds), Public Health and Health Services Research in Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: International Perspectives, Imperial College Press, London.

Appleby, R.J. 2017, 'Dealing with controversial findings' in McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (eds), Doing Research in Applied Linguistics Realities, dilemmas, and solutions, Routledge, pp. 203-213.
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Featuring over twenty chapters by experienced and up-and-coming researchers from around the world, this book: outlines the steps involved in solving the problem and completing a successful, and publishable, project; provides case studies of ...

Attfield, S.J. & Driver, E. 2017, 'Sketching Out Portlandia's Musical Layers' in Giuffre, L. (ed), Music in Comedy Television Notes on Laughs, Routledge, pp. 142-156.

Browitt, J. 2017, 'The garage as vernacular museum: reading contemporary masculinity through ‘man caves’' in Lloyd, J. & Vasta, E. (eds), Reimagining Home in the 21st Century, Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK.
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Contemporary masculinity is constructed, performed and maintained through all kinds of symbolic practices and rituals. One recent kind of symbolic practice/expression is ‘man caves’ or ‘man spaces’, a certain kind of domestic space dedicated to and inhabited by primarily heterosexual men in spousal relationships: converted garages, basements, sheds, spare rooms and so forth. These spaces usually involve the storage of favourite objects, which can range from cars and car parts, motorcycles, tools, collectibles and, memorabilia, to musical and gym equipment, TVs/home theatres, alcohol paraphernalia, weapons, books, and so forth. Man caves function for building, repairing and maintaining ‘stuff’, but also as entertainment centres, as ‘toys’, as an escape into solitude or, conversely, as a place to entertain friends, as a place to express oneself in an-other way, a place to let one’s imagination run free. They are a key site for reading the performance of contemporary, urban masculinity. Within the confines of the domestic sphere, man caves promise of control over a space, its décor and the socialisation therein.

Buchanan, J., Major, J., Harbon, L. & Kearney, S. 2017, 'Preparing teachers through international experience: A collaborative critical analysis of four Australian programs' in Reid, C. & Major, J. (eds), Global Teaching: Southern Perspectives on Teachers Working with Diversity, Palgrave Macmillan.
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Clark, A.H. & Elmersjö, H.Å. 2017, 'Epistemology of Rival Histories' in Clark, A. & Elmersjö, H.Å. (eds), International Perspectives on Teaching Rival Histories: Pedagogical Responses to Contested Narratives and the History Wars, Springer, London, pp. 1-14.
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Part I, “Historical cultures and national histories,” consists of three chapters. ... hopeful, showcasing the limits, rather than the possibilities, of “teachers' in conflict-affected societies [propensity] to engage with rival histories in integrated settings.

Ghosh, D. & Jain, A. 2017, 'Green marketing and green consciousness in India' in Green Asia: Ecocultures, sustainable lifestyles, and ethical consumption, Routledge.

Ghosh, D. & Jain, A. 2017, 'Green marketing and green consciousness in India' in Lewis, T. (ed), Green Asia: Ecocultures, sustainable lifestyles, and ethical consumption, Routledge.
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Giuffre, E. 2017, '"Introduction"' in Music in Comedy Television Notes on Laughs, Routledge, New York and London, pp. 1-14.
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From Sesame Street to Saturday Night Live, from Monty Python to Flight of the Conchords, this book offers the perfect introduction for students and scholars in music and media studies seeking to understand the role of music in comedy ...

Giuffre, E. 2017, 'Music in Comedy Television from the Composer's Perspective: Getting 'The Answers You're not looking for' in an Interview with David Schwartz' in Music in Comedy Television Notes on Laughs, Routledge, New York and London, pp. 105-116.
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From Sesame Street to Saturday Night Live, from Monty Python to Flight of the Conchords, this book offers the perfect introduction for students and scholars in music and media studies seeking to understand the role of music in comedy ...

Giuffre, E. & Romeo, D. 2017, 'And Now For Something Completely Different (Sounding): Monty Python's Musical Circus' in Music in Comedy Television Notes on Laughs, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 31-42.
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From Sesame Street to Saturday Night Live, from Monty Python to Flight of the Conchords, this book offers the perfect introduction for students and scholars in music and media studies seeking to understand the role of music in comedy ...

Hilton, A. 2017, 'Coming and staying or coming and going? Immigrant families in Denmark: Challenges and opportunities for integration' in Garvis, S. & Eriksen Odegaard, E. (eds), Nordic dialogues on children and families, Taylor and Francis.
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This chapter was inspired by personal experience and interactions with other newcomers to Denmark. It aims to provide insights into the challenges associated with moving to Denmark, some of which, such as limited employment possibilities or language barriers, are predictable. Others are less obvious, for example, perceptions of Danish society’s values and expectations of newcomers, social norms, and feelings of ‘outsiderness’. Circumstances may be further complicated for families with children and may vary among family members. This chapter presents case studies to shed light on families’ challenges and the factors than influence their decisions to stay or leave.

Hilton, A. & Hilton, G. 2017, 'Higher Order Thinking' in Pendergast, D.L., Main, K. & Bahr, N.M. (eds), Teaching Middle Years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, Australia, pp. 223-242.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Expertise, learning, and agency in partnership practices in services for families with young children' in Edwards, A. (ed), Working Relationally in and across Practices: A Cultural-Historical Approach to Collaboration, Cambridge University Press, 17, pp. 25-42.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice architectures of simulation pedagogy: From fidelity to transformation' in Mahon, K., Francisco, S. & Kemmis, S. (eds), Exploring Education and Professional Practice: Through the Lens of Practice Architectures, Springer Press, Dordrecht, pp. 63-81.
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In this chapter, I put the theory of practice architectures to work in re-imagining simulation pedagogy in university-based professional education. I locate simulation within a broader landscape of links between higher education and the professions, before outlining key features of existing research on simulation in health professional education. This links to the empirical context underpinning the chapter: an observational study of simulation classes in an undergraduate nursing degree. I take up calls to enrich the theoretical basis for simulation pedagogy, and to shake off an attachment to the notion of ‘fidelity’. Weaving practice architecture theory with Baudrillard’s concepts of hyperreality and simulacra, I analyse three moments from observed simulation classes. I show how these are constituted as productive pedagogic moments, not through a logic of mirroring stable realities of practice, but through much more fluid play between real and imagined worlds. This provides a basis from which to pinpoint the transformative potential of simulation, avoiding the traps of conservatism that accompany a view that is too closely tied to a fixed, stable reality referent. This involves a shift from simulation (re)creating practice architectures and practices based on an ‘as if’ logic, to simulation based on a ‘what if’ notion, where cultural-discursive, material-economic, and socio-political arrangements of both real and imagined practices come together, interwoven with those of responsive, emergent pedagogy.

Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice, the Body and Pedagogy: Attuning as a Basis for Pedagogies of the Unknown' in Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education Praxis, Diversity and Contestation, Springer, pp. 87-106.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice, the body and pedagogy: attuning as a basis for pedagogies of the unknown' in Grootenboer, P., Edwards-Groves, C. & Choy, S. (eds), Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education Praxis, Diversity and Contestation, Springer, pp. 87-106.
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Hopwood, N. 2017, 'Practice, the body and pedagogy: attuning as a basis for pedagogies of the unknown' in Grootenboer, P., Edwards-Groves, C. & Choy, S. (eds), Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education Praxis, Diversity and Contestation, Springer, Germany, pp. 87-106.
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Practice theories in education capture the diversity within and across sites and practices. The title of the book—Practice Theory Perspectives on Pedagogy and Education, captures the central overarching focus that underpins the chapters in  ...

Jakubowicz, A.H. 2017, 'Unplanned stay: how the Polish Jews became refugees in Shanghai in 1941 (Jìhuà wài de dòuliú:1941 Nián bōlán yóutàirén rúhé zài shànghǎi lún wéi nànmín)' in Pan, G., Zhang, J., Chen, X. & Zhang, Y. (eds), Jewish Refugees and China: Sources on Jewish refugees in China Vol. IV Academic Perspectives, Shanghai Jiaotong University Press, pp. 29-37.

Johnson, B. 2017, 'Sound Studies Today: Where are we going?' in Damousi, J. & Hamilton, P. (eds), A Cultural History of Sound, Memory and the Senses, Routledge.

Keogh, B.G. & Evans, M.a.r.k. 2017, 'Popular Music and the Religious Screen' in Christopher Patridge & Marcus Moberg (eds), The Bloomsbury Handbook of Religion and Popular Music, Bloomsbury, New York.

Laurie, T. & Hickey-Moody, A. 2017, 'Masculinity and Ridicule' in Papenburg, B. (ed), Gender: Laughter, Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks, Farmington Hills, MI, pp. 215-228.
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Exploring the social conditions that make men laugh at other men, this chapter considers the ways hegemonic masculinity is maintained through certain kinds of homosocial ridicule.

Macnamara, J. & Kenning, G. 2017, '“Stoner Sloth”: Lessons from Evaluation of Social Media and Virality' in VanSlyke Turk, J. & Valin, J. (eds), Public Relations Case Studies from Around the World (2nd Edition), Peter Lang.
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Macnamara, J.R. 2017, 'Digital and social media communication' in Tench, R. & Yeomans, L. (eds), Exploring Public Relations: Global Strategic Communication, Pearson, Harlow, UK, pp. 35-59.
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This chapter: Identifies and discusses communication and media theories that inform understanding of social media and their use; Critiques social media practices in the context of communication and media theories; Identifies the opportunities as well as the risks and dysfunctions of social media; and Informs readers on how to apply social media in public relations practice.

Maher, D. & Yoo, J. 2017, 'Project-Based Learning in the Primary School Classroom' in Progress in Education.
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Maher, D. & Young, K.A. 2017, 'The Use of Mobile Devices to Support Young People with Disabilities' in Stavros, A.V. (ed), Advances in Communications and Media Research, Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp. 101-126.
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Manidis, M. & Yasukawa, K. 2017, 'Developing Professionally: A Practice Based Perspective' in Leibowitz, B., Bozalek, V. & Kahn, P. (eds), Theorising Learning to Teach in Higher Education Realist, Socio-Material and Social Practice Approaches, Routledge, Oxon, pp. 93-109.
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This book will appeal to academics interested in how they come to learn to teach, to administrators and academic developers responsible for professional development strategies at universities and masters and PhD level students researching ...

Mutsvairo, B. 2017, '9781610697750 Online Around the World: A Geographic Encyclopedia of Internet, Social Media and Mobile Apps'.

Mutsvairo, B. 2017, 'Zimbabwe' in Steckman, L. & Andrews, M. (eds), Online around the World:A Geographic Encyclopedia of the Internet, Social Media, and Mobile Apps, ABC-Clio Greenwood, pp. 351-355.

otsuji & Pennycook, A.D. 2017, 'Cities, conviviality and double-edged language play' in Bell, N. (ed), Multiple perspectives on language play, De Gruyter Mouton, Berlin, pp. 199-218.

Parker, P., Bodkin-Andrews, G., Trudgett, M. & Walter, M. 2017, 'Gateways to Occupational Success: Educational Mobility and Attainment for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' in Marshall, A. & Symonds, J. (eds), Young Adult Development at the School-to-Work Transition: International Pathways and Processes, Oxford University Press.

Pietsch, T. 2017, 'Geographies of Selection: Academic Appointments in the British Academic World, 1850-1939' in Jöns, H., Meusburger, P. & Heffernan, M. (eds), Mobilities of Knowledge, Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 157-183.

Prior, J., Dunston, R., Kroll, T., Adams, J. & Steel, A. 2017, 'Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine and global health challenges' in Adams, J. & et al (eds), Public Health and Health Services Research in Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: International Perspectives, Imperial College Press, London.

Sun, W. 2017, 'The greying of greenspeak? Environmental issues, media discourses, and consumer practices in China' in Lewis, T. (ed), Green Asia Ecocultures, Sustainable Lifestyles and Ethical Consumption, Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon, pp. 99-113.
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This book presents an analysis of a range of practices and activities from across Asia that demonstrate that people in Asia are alert to ecological concerns, that they are taking action to implement new styles of green living, and that Asia ...

Vanni Accarigi, I. 2017, 'Transcultural objects, transcultural homes' in Lloyd, J. & Vasta, E. (eds), Reimagining Home in the 21st Century., Elgar, Cheltenham, pp. 192-206.
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In a world increasingly characterized by mobility the idea of what constitutes home has changed dramatically. In its various meaning of family, unit of belonging, locality and even in its geopolitical sense as nation, home is now understood in a transnational and translocal sense. Building on this understanding, this chapter focuses on the concept of home as practiced. The idea of home is considered as a continuous process, which includes people, things, affects, senses, and which extricates the idea of home from the idea of place, of origin or of arrival. This chapter furthers the analysis of homing practices by analyzing the role of objects in the daily life of a group of professional migrant women. Together the stories of these objects generate the argument that ‘home’ is a process, or a set of processes, made of things, practices, language, memory, affects, sensoria and people. By taking four stories as its as its point of departure, this chapter argues that the sense of ‘being at home’ or of belonging to somewhere, in the context of transnational mobility is dissociated from a geographical location and replaced by belonging through everyday practices engender by specific objects.

Walker, J.R. & Cooper, M. 2017, 'Resilience' in Braidotti, R. (ed), The Posthumanities Reader, Bloomsbury, London.

Walker, J.R. & Cooper, M. 2017, 'Resilience' in Castree, N., Hulme, M. & Proctor, J. (eds), The Companion to Environmental Studies, Routledge, London.

Yang, J. 2017, 'Governing Informal Payments by Market in the Chinese Healthcare System' in Polese, A., Williams, C., Horodnic, I. & Bejakovic, P. (eds), The Informal Economy in Global Perspective: Varieties of Governance, Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 233-254.
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Informal payments are an illegitimate practice that has been endemic in the Chinese healthcare system for decades. This chapter examines two market mechanisms that the government has used to contain it, namely, internal competition and differential pricing. It reveals that due to market failures, internal competition pushed up the demand for the services of elite practitioners and led to the concentration of informal payments in their hands. Differential pricing not only concentrated informal payments in the hands of senior surgeons, but also exacerbated health inequality and subverted the government’s ideological commitment to social justice. Both mechanisms did not achieve the purpose of controlling informal payments and have been abandoned either by hospitals or by the government.

Journal articles

Bano, M., Zowghi, D. & da Rimini, F. 2017, 'User Satisfaction and System Success: An Empirical Exploration of User Involvement in Software Development', Empirical Software Engineering: an international journal.
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For over four decades user involvement has been considered intuitively to lead to user satisfaction, which plays a pivotal role in successful outcome of a software project. The objective of this paper is to explore the notion of user satisfaction within the context of the user involvement and system success relationship. We have conducted a longitudinal case study of a software development project and collected qualitative data by means of interviews, observations and document analysis over a period of 3 years. The analysis of our case study data revealed that user satisfaction significantly contributes to the system success even when schedule and budget goals are not met. The case study data analysis also presented additional factors that contribute to the evolution of user satisfaction throughout the project. Users’ satisfaction with their involvement and the resulting system are mutually constituted while the level of user satisfaction evolves throughout the stages of software development process. Effective management strategies and user representation are essential elements of maintaining an acceptable level of user satisfaction throughout software development process.

Barclay, K., Voyer, M., Mazur, N., Payne, A.M., Mauli, S., Kinch, J., Fabinyi, M. & Smith, G. 2017, 'The importance of qualitative social research for effective fisheries management', Fisheries Research, vol. 186, pp. 426-438.
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© 2016Over recent decades it has become widely accepted that managing fisheries resources means managing human behaviour, and so understanding social and economic dynamics is just as important as understanding species biology and ecology. Until recently, fisheries managers and researchers have struggled to develop effective methods and data for social and economic analysis that can integrate with the predominantly biological approaches to fisheries management. The field is now growing fast, however, and globally, researchers are developing and testing new methods. This paper uses three divergent case studies to demonstrate the value of using qualitative social science approaches to complement more conventional quantitative methods to improve the knowledge base for fisheries management. In all three cases, qualitative interview and document review methods enabled broad surveying to explore the research questions in particular contexts and identified where quantitative tools could be most usefully applied. In the first case (the contribution of commercial fisheries to coastal communities in eastern Australia), a wellbeing analysis identified the social benefits from particular fisheries, which can be used to identify the social impacts of different fisheries management policies. In the second case (a gender analysis of fisheries of small islands in the Pacific), analysis outlined opportunities and constraints along fisheries supply chains, illuminated factors inhibiting community development and identified ecological factors that are typically overlooked in conventional fisheries management. In the third case (sea cucumber fisheries in Papua New Guinea), an interactive governance analysis assessed how well fisheries management tools fit the ecological, social and economic reality of the fishery and the trade in its products, including market influences and stakeholder values. The qualitative approach adopted in these three case studies adds a new dimension to under...

Bearman, M., Dawson, P., Bennett, S., Hall, M., Molloy, E., Boud, D. & Joughin, G. 2017, 'How university teachers design assessments: a cross-disciplinary study', Higher Education, pp. 1-16.
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© 2016 Springer Science+Business Media DordrechtThere are dissonances between educators’ aspirations for assessment design and actual assessment implementation in higher education. Understanding how assessment is designed ‘on the ground’ can assist in resolving this tension. Thirty-three Australian university educators from a mix of disciplines and institutions were interviewed. A thematic analysis of the transcripts indicated that assessment design begins as a response to an impetus for change. The design process itself was shaped by environmental influences, which are the circumstances surrounding the assessment design, and professional influences, which are those factors that the educators themselves bring to the process. A range of activities or tasks were undertaken, including those which were essential to all assessment design, those more selective activities which educators chose to optimise the assessment process in particular ways and meta-design processes which educators used to dynamically respond to environmental influences. The qualitative description indicates the complex social nature of interwoven personal and environmental influences on assessment design and the value of an explicit and strategic ways of thinking within the constraints and affordances of a local environment. This suggests that focussing on relational forms of professional development that develops strategic approaches to assessment may be beneficial. The role of disciplinary approaches may be significant and remains an area for future research.

Black, S.R. & Bee, B. 2017, 'Adult literacy provision and social class: Australian contexts', Studies in the Education of Adults, vol. online.
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Adult literacy provision began in Australia during a radical education era in the 1970s, and yet in recent decades, social class as a construct has been largely absent in the academic literature on adult literacy. We argue however that social class is essential to understanding adult literacy provision and furthermore that working class people have not been well served by this provision since the time literacy assumed enhanced status as human capital from the 1990s. We make our case through asking and responding to questions relating to the social class backgrounds of students and their teachers, how people are assessed to need literacy, what is taught, who undertakes research and who influences adult literacy policy. At the macro, structural level of analysis, we discuss the influence on adult literacy provision of the ruling class agendas of international agencies (i.e. the OECD) and national agencies representing capital. At the meso level, we discuss how the main adult literacy provider, technical and further education (TAFE) has failed to meet the adult literacy needs of working class students due to neo-liberal reforms. And at the micro, classroom level, we discuss some implications of class disparities between adult literacy teachers and their students.

Boateng, H. 2017, 'Customer Knowledge Management on Social Media Platform: A case study of MTN Ghana and Vodafone Ghana', Information Development: the international journal for librarians, archivists and information specialists, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 440-451.

Boateng, H., Agyemang, F.G., Okoe, A.F. & Mensah, T.D. 2017, 'Examining the relationship between trustworthiness and students’ attitudes toward knowledge sharing', Library Review, vol. 66, no. 1/2, pp. 16-27.
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Boateng, H., Okoe, A.F. & Tiniwah, M.D. 2017, 'The Relationship between Human Resource Practices and Knowledge Sharing in service firms', Business Information Review, vol. 33, no. 2.

Boud, D., Dawson, P., Bearman, M., Bennett, S., Joughin, G. & Molloy, E. 2017, 'Reframing assessment research: through a practice perspective', Studies in Higher Education, pp. 1-12.
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© 2016 Society for Research into Higher EducationAssessment as a field of investigation has been influenced by a limited number of perspectives. These have focused assessment research in particular ways that have emphasised measurement, or student learning or institutional policies. The aim of this paper is to view the phenomenon of assessment from a practice perspective drawing upon ideas from practice theory. Such a view places assessment practices as central. This perspective is illustrated using data from an empirical study of assessment decision-making and uses as an exemplar the identified practice of ‘bringing a new assessment task into being’. It is suggested that a practice perspective can position assessment as integral to curriculum practices and end separations of assessment from teaching and learning. It enables research on assessment to de-centre measurement and take account of the wider range of people, phenomena and things that constitute it.

Byron, P. 2017, 'Friendship, sexual intimacy and young people’s negotiations of sexual health', Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 486-500.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This paper examines how young people’s friendships influence safer sexual practices. Through a thematic discourse analysis, interviews with Sydney-based young people (aged 18–25 years) and Australian-based sexual health websites for young people are considered. Interview data illustrate how friendships can support young people's sexual experiences, concerns and safeties beyond the practice of ‘safe sex’ (condom use). This is evident in friends’ practices of sex and relationship advice, open dialogue, trust and sharing experiential knowledge, as well as friend-based sex. Meanwhile, friendship discourse from selected Australian sexual health websites fails to engage with the support offered by friendship, or its value to a sexual health agenda. Foucault’s account of friendship as a space of self-invention is considered in light of these data, along with his argument that friendship poses a threat to formal systems of knowing and regulating sex. Whether sexual or not, many close friendships are sexually intimate given the knowledge, support and influence these offer to one’s sexual practices and relations. This paper argues that greater attention to friendship among sexual health promoters and researchers would improve professional engagements with young people’s contemporary sexual cultures, and better inform their attempts to engage young people through social media.

Byron, P. 2017, 'The intimacies of young people’s sexual health and pleasure', Journal of Youth Studies, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 332-348.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This paper considers the discourse of intimacy in young people’s accounts of sexual health. In interviews with people from Sydney aged 18–25 years, diverse understandings of sexual safeties are offered, reflecting a range of sex partner intimacies. This is seen in participants’ accounts of having a range of different partners, having different experiences with a particular partner, and having sex with friends. This discourse is considered against Australian sexual health websites for young people. In the websites, connections between safeties and intimacies are not explored, and discussion of safety is limited to condom use, as per the concept of ‘safe sex’. How condom use is supported and/or challenged by sexual and friendship intimacies is overlooked. In considering research claims about the missing discourse of pleasure in formal approaches to young people’s sexual health, I extend this to a missing discourse of intimacy. Connections between pleasure, intimacy, safety, and friendship are explored throughout this paper, and theorisations of intimacy as cultural, public, and intersubjective are considered, drawing upon the works of Lauren Berlant and Eva Illouz. It is argued that sexual health research and promotion that engages with young people’s conceptualisations of intimacy will better engage with young people’s sexual cultures, and hence be more relevant and useful to this population.

Byron, P. & Hunt, J. 2017, '‘That happened to me too’: young people’s informal knowledge of diverse genders and sexualities', Sex Education, pp. 1-14.
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© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis paper explores how young people of diverse genders and sexualities share information about sex, sexualities and genders. Formal approaches to education often fail to consider young people’s communication and information exchange practices, including the circulation of peer knowledge through social media. In the wake of recent Australian backlash against the Safe Schools Coalition, we can observe how homophobia and queerphobia in the broader community can impact upon young peoples’ ability to learn about themselves and their bodies through formal education. Yet young people of diverse genders and sexualities can be observed to support each other in peer spaces, utilising their knowledge networks. This paper explores young people’s informal learning practices, the capacity of peer networks to support and educate young people, and the challenges of recognising such networks in a culture in which health and education discourses present them as ‘risk subjects’ rather than ‘health agents’. These issues are discussed in relation to our own experiences in research and health promotion, including one author’s role as a youth peer educator. Drawing on our workplace experiences, we provide a number of anecdotal examples which highlight the complexities of informal knowledge practice and information circulation, and the ways these can challenge and reform professional health, education, and research approaches.

Chan, L. 2017, 'Review of : "HIV/AIDS in China and India: Governing Health Security"', The China Journal, vol. 77.

Clark, A.H. 2017, 'The Place of Anzac in Australian Historical Consciousness', Australian Historical Studies, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 19-34.
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There is an ever-greater popular attachment to the commemoration of Anzac Day in Australia, with growing commercial, popular and institutional support around the country. This resurgence has also generated significant disagreement among historians, shaping the historiography of Anzac in recent years and raising important questions about Australia’s current obsession with Anzac: is it a reflection of increasing popular historical engagement, or an ideologically driven ‘mobilisation’ of the past? While various scholars have sought to unpack and understand this potent phenomenon of national sentiment, this article, based on a series of oral interviews with ordinary Australians in selected communities, reveals an uncertainty and complexity in many vernacular responses to Anzac that need to be included if that commemorative sentiment is to be properly understood.

Clerke, T., Hopwood, N., Chavasse, F., Fowler, C., Lee, S. & Rogers, J. 2017, 'Using professional expertise in partnership with families: a new model of capacity- building', Journal of Child and Family Health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 74-84.
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The first five years of parenting are critical to children’s development. Parents are known to respond best to interventions with a partnership-based approach, yet child and family health nurses (CFHNs) report some tension between employing their expertise and maintaining a partnership relationship. This article identifies ways in which CFHNs skilfully use their professional expertise, underpinned by helping qualities and interpersonal skills, to assist families build confidence and capacity, and thus buffer against threats to parent and child well-being. It reports on an Australian ethnographic study of services for families with young children. Fifty-two interactions were observed between CFHNs and families in day-stay and home visiting services in Sydney. A new model is presented, based on four partnership activities and the fluid movement between them, to show how CFHNs use their expertise to identify strengths and foster resilience in families in the longer term, without undermining the principles of partnership.

Dovchin, S. 2017, 'The ordinariness of youth linguascapes in Mongolia', International Journal of Multilingualism, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 144-159.
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Drawing on varied offline and online contexts, this article indicates that youth linguistic diversity in contemporary Mongolia is better understood from the perspective of ‘the ordinariness of linguascapes’. The notion of ‘linguascapes’ is important in capturing the rising complexity of youth mixed language practices fundamentally produced by the amalgamation of transnational linguistic resources that are intersecting with other social landscapes. However, these youth linguascapes in Mongolia are neither novel nor eccentric linguistic productions as mostly imagined in the local language ideology. Instead, youth linguascapes in Mongolia should be understood as part of young people’s everyday, mundane and ordinary linguistic practices. Consequently, it is important for language educators and language policy makers in Mongolia to reconsider youth linguistic diversity in globalisation through the eyes of sameness of differences or the ordinariness of the diversity.

England, N. 2017, 'Developing an Interpretation of Collective Beliefs in Language Teacher Cognition Research', TESOL Quarterly, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 229-238.
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Gills, B.K., Goodman, J. & Hosseini, S.A.H. 2017, 'Theorizing alternatives to capital: Towards a critical cosmopolitanist framework1', European Journal of Social Theory.
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Henninger, M. 2017, 'Government information: Literacies, behaviors and practices', Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices, vol. 1, pp. 8-15.
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The current trend in the delivery of government information online is predicated on the belief that it will enable improvements in the provision of government services and citizens' participation in democratic processes. Government policy in this matter is wrapped in the rhetoric of public accessibility, that is, it must be easy to find, to access and to use. This paper draws upon a case study to explore the validity of this rhetoric; it uses Pierre Bourdieu's concept of society as a metaphorical game in which different players, government and citizens, play with different rules, a situation that can result in mismatches and conflicts in expectations and beliefs. Societal understanding of accessibility to government information is more nuanced and multidimensional than accessibility as an institutional practice within government departments, and requires high levels of digital and civic literacies. The case study findings demonstrate that accessibility did not meet the expectations of a group of university students who were both digitally and civically literate but were not able to find documents mandated to be published. The research concludes that there is a gap between the assumptions of the providers of government information and the expectations of their users; this disparity raises issues of social justice that will need to be bridged if government policies for online information delivery are to fulfil their objectives and rhetoric

Hood, S.E. 2017, 'The Significance of Presence in Building Disciplinary Knowledge', Onomazein: revista de linguistica, filologia y traduccion.

Hopwood, N. & Gottschalk, B. 2017, 'Double stimulation “in the wild”: Services for families with children at-risk', Learning, Culture and Social Interaction.
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Hosseini, S.A.H., Gills, B.K. & Goodman, J. 2017, 'Toward Transversal Cosmopolitanism: Understanding Alternative Praxes in the Global Field of Transformative Movements', Globalizations, pp. 1-18.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis article critically reflects on theoretical dilemmas of conceptualizing recent ideological shifts and contention among global transformative movements. Some studies conceptualize these movements as ideologically mature and coherent, while other inquiries highlight disorganization, fragmentation, disillusion, and dispute. The former line of argument suggests that underlying emerging global solidarities—to the extent they genuinely exist—there are some identifiably coherent cosmopolitanist, or globalist, values. The latter claim that existing global justice and transformative movements lack an effective ideological position for uniting the masses behind a global (political) project for transforming global capitalist social relations. By drawing upon an interpretive review of empirical studies conducted throughout the last decade, the article delineates four modalities, defined in terms of their orientations toward cosmopolitanist values. Among these modalities is a new and promising one, termed here as ‘transversal cosmopolitanist’ (‘transversal’ here understood as a process verb, indicating a new form of cosmopolitanist praxis). This approach assumes the possibility of creating a common ground for fruitful dialogue, constructive collective learning, progressive hybridization, and active political cooperation among diverse identities and ideological visions of contemporary global transformative movements, against existing capitalist social relations and structures of domination.

Hunter, J.L. 2017, 'Case study: Technology-enhanced learning in High Possibility Classrooms in Australian schools', SAGE Research Methods Cases.
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Jeffreys, E. 2017, 'Understanding the Lei Feng Revival: Evidence from a Survey of Chinese Students', China Media Research, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 54-66.
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Jeffreys, E. & Xu, J. 2017, 'Celebrity-inspired, Fan-driven: Doing Philanthropy through Social Media in Mainland China', Asian Studies Review, pp. 1-19.
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© 2017 Asian Studies Association of AustraliaThis paper provides the first detailed study of the links between celebrity-fan communication networks and philanthropy in the People’s Republic of China. It explains how the evolution of the Chinese Internet, and especially the rise of social media, has created new spaces in which fans of entertainment celebrities may be induced to engage with philanthropic causes. It then outlines the history of Chinese fan-driven philanthropic initiatives centred on people who became famous through reality-television popular music competitions. Finally, it offers a case study of the initiatives connected to popstar Li Yuchun, and examines the rationales provided by fans in online forums and interviews for their philanthropic engagement. Critics of celebrity-inspired philanthropy highlight its supposedly inauthentic and passive nature. Yet we find that fans actively exploit the forms of sociality that are provided by celebrity-fan communication networks, both to establish virtual participatory communities and to generate social action in the form of non-government-organised volunteering.

Joseph, S.A. 2017, 'The Essay as Polemical Performance: ‘salted genitalia’ and the ‘gender card’', TEXT, vol. Special, no. Special Issue Number 39 The Essay, pp. 1-16.
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On October 9, 2012, the then Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard rose to her feet in Canberra’s Parliament House, and in response to a motion tabled by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, delivered her blistering Misogyny Speech. Although Gillard’s speech was met with cynicism by the Australian Press Gallery, some accusing her of playing the ‘gender card’, it reverberated around the world and when the international coverage poured back into the country, ordinary Australians stood up and listened. One of them was author, essayist, classical concert pianist and mother, Anna Goldsworthy. Shortly after the delivery of The Misogyny Speech, Quarterly Essay editor Chris Feik approached Goldsworthy to write the 50th essay for the Black Inc. publication, his idea to view it through a cultural lens. It took several months to research and compose, resulting in Unfinished Business: Sex, Freedom and Misogyny. The issue was launched at the Wheeler Centre in Melbourne on July 1, 2013, five days after Julia Gillard was deposed from her Prime Ministership. This paper takes a look back at the 50th issue of the Quarterly Essay, to discuss with its author her essay-writing process and the aftermath of publication. Goldsworthy is erudite as she looks at the construction of the essay, its contents and her love of essay writing. Although she confesses to not having a definition for the form, she believes it does not matter; that its fluidity is a basic constituent element. Her love of language and music inform both the breadth of her essay, as well as its narrative – there is lyricism to her sentences and a musicality to her structure. This paper also contextualises Unfinished Business as an example of the crucial long form essay contribution that Black Inc.’s Quarterly Essay performs in the Australian literary/ political/ cultural/ intellectual environment. There were critics of Goldsworthy’s essay, and these are assessed as a component of how ‘the essay’ can function in a liberal F...

Joseph, S.A. & Latona, F. 2017, 'Guiding life writers: The supervision of creative doctoral work interrogating personal trauma', New Writing: the international journal for the practice and theory of creative writing, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 23-35.
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There exists much literature on the student and doctoral candidate relationship across the disciplines. However, there is a gap in understanding this crucial dynamic in the context of creative practices, and an even more pronounced gap interrogating the supervisor to candidate dynamic when a student is conducting life writing involving personal trauma. Despite this, more and more universities are opening their doors to these types of research projects. In 2014, a final year doctoral candidate in life writing and her supervisor conducted a mini research project about their experience of supervision. The crux of their investigation hinged on the relatively nuanced requirements of supervision when the candidate is writing about personally traumatic themes in their dissertation. This paper is an extension of their original findings, amalgamating conclusions about what worked in the context of their relationship, given the delicate nature of the subject matter that they were investigating academically, and existing literature on the ethics of such supervision and theories of trauma writing in the context of life writing. By combining their analysis of their real experiences as supervisor and candidate, and preexisting academic thought on both the requirements of supervision and the differing needs of post-trauma students, the authors seek to contribute to the growing canon within the creative practices on supervisor/candidate relationships, as well as the relatively fraught ethics of the commodification of life experiences within tertiary institutions.

Joseph, S.A. & Rickett, C. 2017, 'Beyond this point here be dragons: consideration and caution for supervising HDR writing trauma projects', TEXT JOURNAL OF WRITING AND WRITING COURSES, no. Special Issue Writing Trauma.
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Abstract As memoir and autobiographical/ autoethnographic texts flourish in the market place, so this emergence is reflected in the tertiary sector. Mostly sited within journalism, English and creative writing schools, accordingly a proportion of these texts incorporate trauma narrative as students turn to creative practice degrees as a means to write through disruptive autobiographical events. Accordingly, supervisors of HDR candidates undertaking long form trauma narrative find themselves more and more immersed in the trauma, bearing witness to their students’ potential unease. We argue that this type of supervision may potentially necessitate a differentiated management approach, with the establishment of additional protocols, informed by the potential dangers of re-traumatisation of the candidate; and vicarious traumatisation of the supervisor. The aim of this paper is to report on some of the preliminary findings of a qualitative research project [1] where a range of Australian academics supervising Higher Degree Research (HDR) candidates writing about traumatic experiences were interviewed regarding supervisory protocols and practices. Here we focus on selected insights from supervisors who responded to one of the interview questions: ‘what do you consider the potential risks for a student and a supervisor involved in HDR projects framed by trauma narrative?’ We anticipate this paper will provide helpful perspectives from experienced academics for early career supervisors about to embark on trauma shaped projects.

Joseph, S.A. & Rickett, C. 2017, 'Embedding, embellishing and embarrassing: Brian Williams ‘misremembers’', Ethical Space: the international journal of communication ethics, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 32-41.
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“It felt like a personal experience that someone else wanted to participate in and didn’t deserve to participate in.” Brian Williams enjoyed the trust of his organisation and audience for 10 years as NBC’s Nightly News anchor and Managing Editor. But on the night of January 30, 2015 during a broadcast, his high profile status began to unravel. Venerated as a reliable news source, Williams was forced to explain his legendary story of survival one day in the skies above the Iraq War. His version of an attack on a Chinook helicopter he was travelling in was circulated and valorised by his own corporation for 12 years. But when American soldier Lance Reynolds and other military challenged the veracity of his version of historical events, the corporation was forced to suspend him. Williams equates his rewriting and false reporting of this historical event as an act of ‘misremembering’. This assertion is a clear breach of how the Society of Professional Journalists missions its American members: ‘ethical journalism strives to ensure the free exchange of information that is accurate, fair and thorough. An ethical journalist acts with integrity’. NBC responded to this breach by suspending Williams for six months. However, the focus of this paper is audience response and the ways in which the production of new online texts, in the form of satirical memes, ubiquitously serves to critique and ridicule Williams’ claim of ‘misremembering’. And as such, the circulation of these online memes which re-appropriate historical moments, lend themselves in turn to the manufacture of parodic artefacts.

Joseph, S.A. & Rickett, C. 2017, 'The ethical supervision of long form writing: managing trauma narrative within the Australian tertiary sector', Ethical Space: the international journal of communication ethics.
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Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those who do not write, compose or paint can manage to escape the madness, the melancholia, the panic fear which is inherent in the human situation. Miller and Tougaw observe, “If every age has its symptoms, ours appears to be the age of trauma”. Their observation may help explain the emergence of memoir and autobiographical or autoethnographic creative works, not just commercially but also within the tertiary sector. Almost all of this work is appearing within journalism, English and creative writing schools as students turn to creative practice degrees as a means to write through traumatic events. The focus of this paper is to report on the findings of a qualitative research project where a range of Australian academics supervising trauma narrative HDR candidates were interviewed regarding what their needs are in relation to the ethical supervision of their candidates. This paper will also contribute to a better understanding of the supervisory relationship pertinent to candidates undertaking their own personal trauma narrative research and the ways in which academics can provide a safer space for both themselves and Research by Higher Degree students.

Jung, K., Dalton, B. & Willis, J. 2017, 'From revolutionary mother, to breadwinner, to the hyper-feminine woman: Fashion andthe social construction of femininity in North Korea', Asian Studies Review.
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In this paper we argue that North Korea’s socioeconomic transformation has had a profound and yet under-appreciated impact on the social construction of femininity. Drawing on forty-five in-depth interviews with North Korean refugees, interviews with regular visitors to North Korea and NGO workers, as well as our own field notes from trips to North Korea, we analyse changes over three discernible (yet overlapping) economic periods: the 1960s-1990s pre-famine period; the mid-1990s to late 2000s grassroots capitalism era; and the current Kim Jong Un period of quasi-capitalism. As dress is a discursive daily practice of gender, we focus on the practice of femininity as shown through North Korean women’s fashion choices. We argue that images of women in state propaganda have been shaped primarily by male leaders, but norms of femininity have shaped, and also been shaped by, women themselves. That is, the recent trend for North Korean women to dress in hyper-feminine styles can be explained in terms of women remaking themselves and planning their future lives.

Kang, M. 2017, 'French publishing networks in Asia 1840-1940 (forthcoming)', Contemporary French & Francophone Studies.

Kang, M. 2017, 'Migration of French books in China', French Cultural Studies, pp. 1880-1930.

Khamis, S., Ang, L. & Welling, R. 2017, 'Self-branding, ‘micro-celebrity’ and the rise of Social Media Influencers', Celebrity Studies, pp. 1-18.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThe notion of self-branding has drawn myriad academic responses over the last decade. First popularised in a provocative piece published in Fast Company, self-branding has been criticised by some on theoretical, practical and ethical grounds, while others have endorsed and propelled the idea. This article considers how and why the concept of self-branding has become so prevalent. We contend that it parallels the growth of digital technology (particularly social media) embedded in the current political climate: neoliberal individualism. Another objective here is to imbue the concept of self-branding with a marketing perspective and show how the ‘celebrities’ of self-branding manifest at a marketing media nexus distinct to the opening decades of the twenty-first century. Building on literature from mostly media and cultural studies, this critique sees self-branding as a distortion of key branding principles that has obvious implications for its practitioners and advocates. The article shows that, despite inherent tensions and problematic ironies, self-branding persists through the rise of Social Media Influencers; we consider three of these whose fame and following was achieved via the practices and phenomena under consideration.

Laurie, T. 2017, 'Soundtracks of Asian America: Navigating Race through Musical Performance (Review)', IASPM@Journal, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 181-184.

Laurie, T. & Grealy, L. 2017, 'Higher Degree Research by Numbers: Beyond the Critique of Neo-liberalism', Higher Education Research and Development, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 458-471.
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This article argues that strong theories of neo-liberalism do not provide an adequate frame for understanding the ways that measurement practices come to be embedded in the life-worlds of those working in higher education. We argue that neo-liberal metrics need to be understood from the viewpoint of their social usage, alongside other practices of qualification and quantification. In particular, this article maps the specific variables attending measurement in Higher Degree Research (HDR) programs, as the key sites that familiarize students with measurement practices around research and teaching. With regard to the incremental reframing of doctoral study as a utilitarian pursuit, we suggest a need to better identify the singular and immeasurable features of long-term research projects, and argue for a revitalized notion of failure. In this context, this article suggests that many critiques of neo-liberalism do not sufficiently advance alternative ways to think about the purposes and limitations of higher education.

Laurie, T. & Khan, R. 2017, 'The Concept of Minority for the Study of Culture', Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 92-103.
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The title of this special issue and the conference that produced it, Minor Culture, could have been borrowed from many different intellectual traditions. However, if a decisive break must be identified in the meanings attached to ‘minor’, it remains Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature (1975, Kafka hereafter). The article therefore begins by examining Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of ‘minor literature’ as an anti-sociological reworking of minor and minority, although as we suggest, the French philosophers’ commentary does not proceed without its own embedded assumptions about social context(s). The article then turns toward those policy-driven sociological traditions that Deleuze and Guattari sought to escape, focusing on the North American sociology of the Chicago School. As part of this discussion, we also reflect on the construction of ‘minorities’ through social narratives about numbers, taking Australian immigration debates as an example. As a third key paradigm in the study of the ‘minor’, the article revisits cultural studies’ own embrace of the Popular as a site for political struggles over the meanings attached to ‘major’ and ‘minor’ social identities. Finally, we consider the range of transformative cultural practices addressed in this Minor Culture special issue, and reflect on the utility of the ‘minor’ in holding together disparate political projects.

Lindh Falk, A., Hopwood, N. & Abrandt Dahlgren, M. 2017, 'Unfolding Practices: A Sociomaterial View of Interprofessional Collaboration in Health Care', Professions and Professionalism, vol. 7, no. 2.
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Knowledge sharing is an essential part of interprofessional practice and will be even more important in the future in regard to the opportunities and challenges in practices for delivering safe and effective healthcare. The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore how professional knowledge can be shared in an interprofessional team at a spinal cord injury rehabilitation unit. A sociomaterial perspective on practice was used to analyse the data, and by theorizing upon this, we captured different aspects of interprofessional collaboration in health care. The findings illuminate how knowledge emerges and is shared between professionals, and how it passes along as chain of actions between professionals, in various ways. The findings offer a novel perspective on how interprofessional collaboration as a practice, involving ongoing learning, unfolds. This reveals the mechanisms by which different forms of expertise are mobilized between professions as health care work.

Macnamara, J.R. & Likely, F. 2017, 'Revisiting the disciplinary home of evaluation: New perspectives to inform PR evaluation standards', Research Journal of the Institute for Public Relations, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 1-21.
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From historical analysis of the early development of public relations evaluation (early 1980s to the early 2000s), this paper shows that public relations scholarship and practice have drawn heavily on media and communication studies in developing models and methods of evaluation, but have not significantly engaged with the large related body of knowledge on program evaluation. While communication and media studies are logical and formative disciplinary homes for public relations (PR), this paper argues that PR is a transdisciplinary field and that program evaluation is a mostly overlooked source of influence and heritage in relation to evaluation. This analysis presents evidence that a disciplinary ‘home visit’ to program evaluation, which nestles within program theory and theory of change, offers much to overcome the long-standing stasis in PR evaluation and to inform the search for standards.

Macnamara, J.R. & Zerfass, A. 2017, 'Evaluation stasis continues in PR and corporate communication: Asia Pacific insights into causes', Communication Research and Practice, pp. 1-16.
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The first comprehensive study of public relations (PR) and corporate communication practices across Asia-Pacific countries has found that, despite being an area of rapid growth, evaluation remains limited, is often not based on reliable research methods, and is focussed on outputs rather than the outcomes of communication. This reflects a worldwide stasis in evaluation of PR that has been identified as problematic by a number of authors. The Asia-Pacific Communication Monitor, a survey-based study conducted by a collaboration of 16 universities across 23 Asia-Pacific countries in 2015, also explored practitioners’ skills, and found a significant lag that could account for this stasis. This article reports key findings of this study that contribute insights to address the lack of measurement and evaluation in the growing field of PR that remains a major concern in the academy and industry.

Maher, D. & Prescott, A.E. 2017, 'Professional development for rural and remote teachers using video conferencing', Asia-PacificJournal of Teacher Education.
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Teachers in rural and remote schools face many challenges including those relating to distance, isolation and lack of professional development opportunities. This article examines a project where mathematics and science teachers were provided with professional development opportunities via video conferencing to help them use syllabus documents to develop their teaching programs. The study is qualitative and draws on teacher conversations and surveys using a community of inquiry theoretical framework to analyse the data. The results demonstrate that teacher professional development via video conferencing has both strengths and weaknesses but can support teachers through collaboration to develop their expertise in writing teaching programs.

Maher, D. & Twining, P. 2017, 'Bring your own device – a snapshot of two Australian primary schools', Educational Research, vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 73-88.
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Background: The use of 1:1 and Bring Your Own Device strategies in schools is in its infancy and little is known about how mobile devices such as tablets are being used to support educational practice. Purpose: In this article, two suburban primary schools in Sydney, Australia were focused on with an aim to understand how mobile device strategies were developed and implemented and how the devices were being used in the schools. Design and method: This qualitative study uses a case study method. It draws upon questionnaires, interviews and classroom observations, and builds upon previous research in English and Australian schools. Findings: Results of the research indicate that the devices have only recently been incorporated into the school and suggest that their usage has been generally embraced by both school staff and parents. Key issues highlighted by these two schools included the importance of the school’s vision and uncertainty about the differences between models of provision. Participant responses also referenced some positive impacts on classroom practice, which amplify constructivist pedagogy: there were examples of device use extending student learning by supporting peer assessment, collaboration, research skills and projects.

Martin, G. 2017, 'Scaling critical pedagogy in higher education', Critical Studies in Education, no. 1, pp. 1-18.
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Across the globe, neoliberal reforms have produced effects in the higher education sector that are multiple, convergent and embodied or performed. In this context, a growing number of activist-scholars, from a range of disciplines, have explored the role of critical pedagogy within the space of the classroom. Yet, persistent critiques and challenges suggest that the field of critical pedagogy needs to build upon a richer set of theoretical and practical insights. While the discipline of geography has proven to be a generative source of learning and renewal, a recurring tendency exists within the educational literature to treat the key geographical concept of scale as a discrete, pre-given unit of analysis. Consequently, scale remains largely under-theorised and misunderstood leading to simplistic binary oppositions and choices. This binary filter underpins a comfortable but problematic ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ paradigm. Drawing upon contentious debates in the field of geography, this paper explores how the intersections between diverse spatial concepts, including scale, might be strategically deployed to rework the spatial imaginings of critical pedagogy.

McKee, A. 2017, 'Learning from commercial entertainment producers in order to create entertainment sex education', Sex Education: sexuality, society and learning, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 26-40.
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The Girlfriend Guide to Life was a commercial entertainment product co-edited by an entertainment producer and an academic researcher to reach 14–17-year olds with information they wanted to know about sexual health, in language, genres and designs that they wanted. Entertainment–Education is a familiar approach to distributing information, including information about sexual health, in non-formal learning contexts. However, previous accounts of Entertainment– Education have highlighted a tension between the audience-centred approach of entertainment production and the message-centred approach of education. Using a practice-led methodology and drawing on reflective practice, this article suggests that if educators go deeper than asking entertainment producers to simply make cosmetic changes to content, and accept that entertainment producers have a vital understanding of what target audiences need to know about sexual health, a reciprocal working relationship can be developed that overcomes some of the differences in habitus between entertainment producers and educators that have been identified by previous researchers.

McMahon, S., Harwood, V., Bodkin-Andrews, G., O Shea, S., McKnight, A., Chandler, P. & Priestly, A. 2017, 'Lessons from the AIME approach to the teaching relationship: valuing biepistemic practice', Pedagogy, Culture and Society, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 43-58.
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© 2016 Pedagogy, Culture & SocietyThe Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) is a national, extra-curricular mentoring programme that is closing the educational gap for young Indigenous Australians. So what is AIME doing that is working so well? This article draws on a large-scale classroom ethnography to describe the pedagogies that facilitate the teacher–student relationships in this programme. We use Shawn Wilson’s theorisation of Indigenous ways of knowing in order to ‘unpack’ how these approaches succeeded in creating the egalitarian and trust-filled relationships reportedly experienced in the AIME programme.

Middleweek, B.M. 2017, 'Deviant Divas: Lindy Chamberlain and Schapelle Corby and the case for a new category of celebrity for criminally implicated women', Crime, Media, Culture: an international journal, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 85-105.
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In the field of celebrity studies much has been written about the superficiality of contemporary celebrity culture in which ordinary individuals are recognised as exceptional or worthy of public attention in the absence of any particular talent, contribution or achievement (Bell, 2010; Boorstin, 1972; Gamson, 1994; Langer in Edgar, 1980; Marwick and boyd, 2011; Redmond, 2013; Rojek, 2001; Turner, 2004, 2014; Turner et al., 2000). Much less has been written about the link between celebrity and criminality and the types of categories into which celebrified criminals fall (Jenks and Lorentzen, 1997; Penfold-Mounce, 2009). In the scant studies that do exist there is a thinness of attention to gender despite persuasive arguments within feminist criminological studies that crime is a gendered concept in news discourse (Jewkes, 2011; Smart, 1977). Using a qualitative content analysis of a selection of news articles on two high profile cases involving women convicted of a crime, Lindy Chamberlain (now exonerated) and Schapelle Corby, as well as recent work in the sociology of risk on desire and transgression, this research suggests that the current naming practices surrounding criminally implicated women do not adequately capture the constellation of gender-inflected media messages and the meanings with which they are imbued by sections of news workers. The implications of this research warrant a re-think of the customary labels ascribed to women convicted of a crime and the addition to existing taxonomies of a new category of celebrity, the ‘deviant diva’.

Middleweek, B.M. 2017, 'Dingo media? The persistence of the “trial by media” frame in popular, media, and academic evaluations of the Azaria Chamberlain case', Feminist Media Studies, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 392-411.
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In the bulk of popular, media, and scholarly discourse on Azaria Chamberlain’s disappearance there is overwhelming consensus that the sensationalist reporting of the event convicted parents Michael and Lindy of their daughter’s murder outside official court processes. In feminist scholarship in particular, the infant’s disappearance in August 1980 has been read according to a “trial by media” frame. This frame persists despite altered perspectives about the role of the Australian public whose punitive and collectively hostile response to a media-driven hysteria has been replaced with the portrait of a kinder and more compassionate nation. The objectives of this article are threefold: to demonstrate the persistence of the trial by media frame in popular, media, and academic discourse; to consider assumptions of a monolithic and hostile media; and by examining a previously unanalysed archive to suggest that these arguments overlook the existence of sympathetic voices in mainstream media as well as the dialogic connection between media and counter-publics mutually supporting the Chamberlains’ bid for innocence. This research offers an alternative view to scholarship on a landmark event in Australian history and has broader implications for the way we view the media in trial by media situations.

Mitchell, T. 2017, 'Lorde: a mole in the mainstream?', Celebrity Studies, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 51-70.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupIn her essay ‘Mainstream as Metaphor: Imagining Dominant Culture’, Alison Huber lists some of the values often assigned to mainstream pop music in Dick Hebdige’s Subculture: The Meaning of Style, and other sources, both ‘popularly and academically’ – ‘banal, homogeneous, unsophisticated, undiscerning, uncultured, low, inauthentic, fake, commercial, conservative, conformist or just plain stupid’ – before going on to defend it. Pop ‘mainstreamness’, she asserts, is also now achieved through ‘digital downloads, file-sharing and social media’ rather than ‘CD singles, hit countdowns and music magazines’. This shift in mediatisation – although the hegemony of the US Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard Music Awards, Grammy Awards and, to a lesser extent, Brit Awards and local music awards still reigns supreme – partly explains how a completely unknown 16-year-old from Auckland, New Zealand, can suddenly achieve US mainstream pop supremacy, and appear to completely overturn all of Huber’s list of perceived negative values. This article considers Lorde from eight different perspectives: Lorde as a celebrity, Lorde the ‘gifted child’, Lorde as a feminist, Lorde and Miley Cyrus, Lorde’s influences, Lorde in/on the music industry, Lorde as a teenager and, finally, the impact and value of Lorde’s music.

Narayan, B. 2017, 'aa'.

Narayan, B. & Luca, E. 2017, 'Utiliser le design thinking pour repenser la signalétique en bibliothèque universitaire', i2d: Information, données & documents, vol. 54, no. 1.
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Déambuler sans but d’un rayonnage à l’autre peut être une expérience agréable, mais lorsqu’on est peu familier des bibliothèques, on peut facilement être désorienté par leurs richesses. Une bonne signalétique permet au public de trouver son chemin. En revanche, une signalétique incohérente ou mal conçue fait fuir les usagers. Le design thinking permet de traiter cette question.

Odoom, R., Boateng, H. & Omane, A.B. 2017, 'An Empirical Investigation of Perceived Relational Benefits and Brand Engagement in Restaurant Services', International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29, no. 11.

Olsson, M.R. 2017, 'Being in place: embodied information practices', Information Research: an international electronic journal, vol. 22, no. 1.
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Introduction. The concept of embodied information practices and the implications for research and professional practice are examined drawing from the authors’ empirical studies of people engaged in professional and everyday practices. The authors suggest that information behaviour research’s focus on individual cognition has led our field to overlook the important role that embodied practices play in individual and collective sense-making. Method. Conceptual paper that draws from a number of qualitatively framed research projects, which explore the role of information practices in knowledge construction. Conclusions. Empirical studies which focus on non-linguistic and embodied practices may appear removed from the Library and Information Science agenda, however these should become increasingly routine, because they provide the research field with a source of information about how people engage with the non-normative aspects of everyday life and learn from others to inform their practices.

Palmer, T.-.A., Burke, P.F. & Aubusson, P. 2017, 'Why school students choose and reject science: a study of the factors that students consider when selecting subjects', International Journal of Science Education.
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Student study of science at school has been linked to the need to provide a scientifically capable workforce and a scientifically literate society. Educators, scientists, and policymakers are concerned that too few students are choosing science for study in their final years of school. How and why students choose and reject certain subjects, including science, at this time is unclear. A Best–Worst Scaling (BWS) survey was completed by 333 Year 10 (age 14–17) students to investigate the relative importance of 21 factors thought to impact students’ subject-selection decisions. Students ranked enjoyment, interest and ability in a subject, and its perceived need in their future study or career plans as the most important factors in both choosing and rejecting subjects. They considered advice from teachers, parents or peers as relatively less important. These findings indicate that enhancing students’ enjoyment, interest, and perceptions of their ability in science, as well as increasing student perceptions of its value in a future career, may result in more students studying science at school.

Pennycook, A.D. 2017, 'Posthumanist applied linguistics', Applied Linguistics.
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Posthumanism urges us to reconsider what it means to be human. From proclamations about the death of ‘Man’ to investigations into enhanced forms of being, from the advent of the Anthropocene (human-induced planetary change) to new forms of materialism and distributed cognition, posthumanism raises significant questions for applied linguistics in terms of our understandings of language, humans, objects, and agency. After reviewing the broad field of posthumanist thought, this paper investigates—through an overview of a series of recent research projects—the notion of repertoire, to show how this can be better understood by stepping out of the humanist constructs of the individual and the community and looking instead at the notion of distributed language and spatial repertoires. The paper concludes by discussing the implications of posthumanism for applied linguistics, in particular the ways we understand language in relation to people, objects, and place.

Pennycook, A.D. 2017, 'Translanguaging and semiotic assemblages', International Journal of Multilingualism.

Pennycook, A.D. & appleby, R. 2017, 'Swimming with Sharks, Ecological Feminism and Posthuman Language Politics', Critical Inquiry in Language Studies: an international journal.
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Pressick-Kilborn, K.J. & Prescott, A. 2017, 'Engaging primary children and pre-service teachers in a whole school 'Design and Make Day': The evaluation of a creative science and technology collaboration', Teaching Science, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 18-26.
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A pedagogical innovation was collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated in the context of a school-university partnership. The innovation had a dual purpose: 1) to provide an opportunity for primary pre-service teachers to develop their understanding and experience of teaching 'design and produce' processes (working technologically), and 2) to involve primary students in a highly engaging, meaningful learning experience with high visibility in the school's community. We decided that this could best take the form of an annual whole school 'Design and Make Day' (DM Day). In this paper, we describe the context of the DM Day, spotlight three tasks, and share the key findings from the project evaluation.

Rissel, C., Richters, J., de Visser, R.O., McKee, A., Yeung, A. & Caruana, T. 2017, 'A Profile of Pornography Users in Australia: Findings From the Second Australian Study of Health and Relationships', Journal of Sex Research, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 227-240.
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© 2016, Routledge. All rights reserved.There are societal concerns that looking at pornography has adverse consequences among those exposed. However, looking at sexually explicit material could have educative and relationship benefits. This article identifies factors associated with looking at pornography ever or within the past 12 months for men and women in Australia, and the extent to which reporting an “addiction” to pornography is associated with reported bad effects. Data from the Second Australian Study of Health and Relationships (ASHR2) were used: computer-assisted telephone interviews (CASIs) completed by a representative sample of 9,963 men and 10,131 women aged 16 to 69 years from all Australian states and territories, with an overall participation rate of 66%. Most men (84%) and half of the women (54%) had ever looked at pornographic material. Three-quarters of these men (76%) and more than one-third of these women (41%) had looked at pornographic material in the past year. Very few respondents reported that they were addicted to pornography (men 4%, women 1%), and of those who said they were addicted about half also reported that using pornography had had a bad effect on them. Looking at pornographic material appears to be reasonably common in Australia, with adverse effects reported by a small minority.

Robert, J.L. 2017, 'A Nouveau Roman de la route: Marc Séguin’s La foi du braconnier and the Challenge of Rewriting', Australian Journal of French Studies, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 96-109.
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Québécois novelist Marc Séguin’s La foi du braconnier (2009) is a road novel, an iconic American genre centred on the youthful quest for purpose and permissible rebellion against societal norms, reminiscent of Franco-American Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. Far from being just another imitator of this genre-defining novel, Séguin’s tale of a Québécois-Mohawk poacher who decides to drive a route that spells out FUCK YOU on the North American continent also draws on elements of the Nouveau Roman to posit a fraught relationship between the acts of writing and driving that are central to the road genre. The novel’s fragmented narration in particular suggests that the self-expression and personal freedom sought on the road are illusory goals.

Robert, J.L., Rolls, A. & Vuaille-Barcan, M.-.L. 2017, 'On Moving and (Inter) Disciplinarity: Thinking about Australian French Studies in the Active Voice', Australian Journal of French Studies, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 3-13.
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Rooney, D. 2017, '(Semi)Public Places, Practices and Pedagogy', Pedagogy Culture and Society.
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Rather than being banal and uninteresting, Western women’s public toilets may be seen as educational spaces. While prolific in number and usage, they have typically escaped research attention. This paper argues that the common inclusion of toilet texts in these places renders them not only interesting but also worthy of inclusion in accounts of public pedagogies. The paper draws attention to the pedagogical voices that occupy the ostensible privacy of places like toilets. It does so by discussing a collection of toilet texts using the entangled concepts of place, practice and pedagogy. Overall, the paper demonstrates how the texts act as proxy for absent pedagogues who seek to disseminate particular knowledges and/or promote specific cultural practices, and in doing so it repositions women’s (semi)public toilets as richly pedagogical.

Rooney, D.L. 2017, '(Semi)Public Places, practices and pedagogy', Pedagogy Culture and Society.
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Rather than being banal and uninteresting, Western women’ s public toilets may be seen as educational spaces. While prolific in number and usage, they have typically escaped research attention. This paper argues that the common inclusion of toilet texts in these places renders them not only interesting but also worthy of inclusion in accounts of public pedagogies. The paper draws attention to the pedagogical voices that occupy the ostensible privacy of places like toilets. It does so by discussing a collection of toilet texts using the entangled concepts of place, practice and pedagogy. Overall, the paper demonstrates how the texts act as proxy for absent pedagogues who seek to disseminate particular knowledges and/or promote specific cultural practices, and in doing so it repositions women’ s (semi)public toilets as richly pedagogical.

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P., Buchanan, J., Varadharajan, M. & Burke, P. 2017, 'The experiences of early career teachers: new initiatives and old problems', Professional Development in Education, vol. Online.
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The task of supporting beginning teachers has received considerable attention in recent years, and numerous initiatives have been implemented. In this article we investigate the experiences of early career teachers (ECTs) in New South Wales, Australia, at a time when their employing authority mandated the provision of mentors and a reduction in face-to-face teaching for ECTs. The article draws on ECTs’ responses to survey items asking about their experiences as an ECT. It emerged that many of the issues of the early years that have caused problems for ECTs remain intractable, or at least unresolved for some. The research indicates that despite support that has been mandated by some employers, we cannot be complacent about the transition of ECTs into the profession. There remains a need to address the elements of school environments that impact on ECTs’ experiences.

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P., Buchanan, J., Varadharajan, M. & Burke, P. 2017, 'The experiences of early career teachers: new initiatives and old problems', Professional Development in Education, no. Online.
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The task of supporting beginning teachers has received considerable attention in recent years, and numerous initiatives have been implemented. In this article we investigate the experiences of early career teachers (ECTs) in New South Wales, Australia, at a time when their employing authority mandated the provision of mentors and a reduction in face-to-face teaching for ECTs. The article draws on ECTs’ responses to survey items asking about their experiences as an ECT. It emerged that many of the issues of the early years that have caused problems for ECTs remain intractable, or at least unresolved for some. The research indicates that despite support that has been mandated by some employers, we cannot be complacent about the transition of ECTs into the profession. There remains a need to address the elements of school environments that impact on ECTs’ experiences.

Schuck, S.R., Kearney, M. & Burden, K.J. 2017, 'Exploring mobile learning in the Third Space', Technology, Pedagogy and Education, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 121-137.
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Mobile learning is enabling educators and students to learn in ways not previously possible. The ways that portable, multi-functional mobile devices can untether the learner from formal institutional learning give scope for learning to be conceptualised in an expanded variety of places, times and ways. In this conceptual article the authors articulate this notion by using the metaphor of the Third Space to envision what can be achieved with mobile learning. They outline their use of the metaphor, consider how it extends notions of twenty-first century learning and use a previously established Mobile Pedagogical Framework to provide a context for the discussion. They conclude with implications of learning in the Third Space for teachers and students. These implications suggest that roles of teachers and students and structure of the curriculum need to change to ensure we leverage the potential of mobile learning.

Sheldon, M.E. 2017, '“Variation in the organization of the Discussion/Conclusion section in Research Articles by English L1, English L2 and Spanish L1 writers”(Submitted May 2017)', Corpora Journal.

Spongberg, M., Walker, G.L. & Whipp, K. 2017, 'Female Biography and the Digital Turn', Women's History Review, pp. 1-16.
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The digital revolution gives new meaning to the concept of ‘shelf life’. It offers the promise of infusing surviving accounts of the ever-fragile female past with both a material and an electronic robustness. Among the many dusty volumes that have benefited dramatically from digital capabilities, few are more emblematic of the power of contemporary technology to advance feminist historical recovery than the six volumes of Mary Hays’s Female Biography: or memoirs of illustrious and celebrated women, of all ages and countries: alphabetically arranged (1803). Female Biography was an anomaly when first published and controversial ever since, imitated but unacknowledged, left to molder on library shelves and in the pages of histories of prosopography. It was the first attempt at a comprehensive biographical history of women in English by a named woman author since Christine de Pizan's City of Ladies (1405) and the first compendium of women by either male or female compilers since Thomas Heywood's Generall Historie of Women (1624, 1657) to include rebellious and impious figures as well as learned ones. It was also the first Enlightenment prosopography of women and a compelling response to the great forgetting of women in traditional histories. While Hays's enterprise was a quintessentially ‘Enlightenment project’, the Female Biography Project to produce the Chawton House Library Edition was very much of the digital age. In this article we examine how Mary Hays put together Female Biography at the cusp of the nineteenth century and what happened in the twenty-first century when some two hundred scholars were assembled to grapple with the scope and scholarship of this work. We also explain the process of constructing a digital archive of Female Biography, and how this enabled a wonderful feat of feminist collaboration across the globe.

Sun, W. & Yu, H. 2017, 'Digital/Social Media and the Chinese Community in Australia', Media Asia.
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Trudgett, M. 2017, 'At the Movies: Contemporary Indigenous cultural expressions- transforming the Australian story', The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education.

Walker, J.R. & Granjou, C. 2017, 'MELiSSA the minimal biosphere: human life, waste and refuge in deep space', Futures.
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MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a long-term technology program of the European Space Agency. Its aim is to construct autonomous habitats in deep space, supplying astronauts with fresh air, water and food through continuous microbial recycling of human wastes. This article considers how anticipated futures of space travel and environmental survival are materialized in the project to engineer the minimal biosphere capable of reliably sustaining human life: a human/microbe association with the fewest possible species. We locate MELiSSA within a history of bio-infrastructures associated with colonisation projects: refugia in which organisms dislocated from their originary habitats are preserved. Analysis of MELiSSA’s sewage-composting technology suggests that the disordering complexity of human waste presents a formidable “bottle-neck” for the construction of the minimal biosphere, in turn suggesting our dependence on microbial communities (soil, the human gut) of potentially irreducible biocomplexity. MELiSSA researchers think of themselves as pragmatic enablers of space exploration, yet a wider family of space colonisation projects are now imagined in terms of the prospect that the Earth might cease to function as the minimal biosphere capable of supporting civilisation. MELiSSA’s politics of anticipation are paradoxical, promising technologies with which to escape from the Earth and through which it may be sustained.

Walker, J.R. & Granjou, C. 2017, 'The Faecal Frontier: Miniaturising the Biosphere and Managing Waste in Deep Space', Wildlife Australia, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 18-21.
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Walker, J.R., Granjou, C. & Salazar, J.F. 2017, 'The Politics of Anticipation: On Knowing and Governing Environmental Futures', Futures.
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In this article we describe how the historical emergence and rise of future studies, since the founding issue of Futures in 1968, has been intricately connected to the emergence and development of environmental anticipation as discourse and practice. We trace a dialectical and inter-twined relationship between technologies of environmental anticipation and forecasting, and technologies of anti-environmentalist anticipation and counter-intervention, one which we argue shapes not only the contemporary politics of anticipation, but in a very material sense, the future conditions of biological and social life on Earth. In so doing we want to address the possible contributions that the field of futures studies can make to to reimagining collective agency and ways of being on Earth, whilst reflecting critically upon its genealogical relations to the political reason and strategic horizons of powerful fossil fuel interests, from the crisis of the 1970s to the present. The article also introduces this special issue of Futures on “The Politics of Environmental Anticipation” with the aim to bring to the fore the role that social scientists play in environmental anticipation – ie. drawing attention to the fact that the future could always have been otherwise. As a whole, this stimulating collection of eight original articles provides a critical assessment of a range of sites where varied and conflicting politics of environmental anticipation are constituted and resisted.

Xu, J. 2017, 'Shanzhai Media Culture: Failed Intervention to the Disingenuous Neoliberal Logic of Chinese Media', Journal of Contemporary China, vol. 26, no. 104, pp. 249-262.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis article studies shanzhai media culture, a specific type of shanzhai culture that copycats the most-watched shows of China Central Television (CCTV) with a sense of satire and play. The article discusses why CCTV has become a popular target of shanzhai, how CCTV’s brand shows are shanzhai-ed and what are the political implications of shanzhaing these established programs. By presenting Lao Meng’s Shanzhai Spring Festival Gala as a case study, the author argues that shanzhai media culture is a creative, participatory and Internet-facilitated grassroots media production, which attempted to resist and intervene in the power–money hegemony of CCTV underpinned by the disingenuous neoliberal logic of Chinese media. However, this culture failed to do so and has been co-opted and reshaped by the powerful logic it attempted to challenge.

Yasukawa, K., Hamilton, M. & Evans, J. 2017, 'A comparative analysis of national media responses to the OECD Survey of Adult Skills: policy making from the global to the local?', Compare, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 271-285.
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© 2016 British Association for International and Comparative Education The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Programme of International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) is put forward as a landmark development in the lifelong monitoring and international comparison of education. The first round of PIAAC’s Survey of Adult Skills compared performance in literacy, numeracy and problem solving in technology-rich environments across 24 countries. However, the translation of any OECD agenda into national policies is mediated by many actors, including the media. This paper examines and compares how the national media of Japan, England and France reported on the PIAAC results of their countries and the extent to which these reports mirror key messages from the OECD’s Country Notes. It begins to trace how the OECD PIAAC agendas materialise into national policies. Although their role in this initial period was limited, we argue the roles of the media together with other policy actors must be monitored as they interact to shape possibilities for sustainable adult education policies.

Yoo, J., Carter, D. & Larkin, J. 2017, 'Making research relevant through an engagement of identities', Issues in educational research, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 381-398.
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This paper is based on a research project designed to cultivate teachers as creative writers and as teachers of creative and critical writing. The project involved both primary and secondary teachers from eight schools located in Sydney, Australia. It documents the evolution of an open-ended research project that aimed to accommodate the needs of external stakeholders, participating teachers, and project researchers. It describes the development of a ‘professional learning community’ formed between the researchers and participants who identified as creative teachers and writers. It also explores how the research project acts as an example of how knowledge production can develop communities of practice via on-going collaboration with stakeholders. The authors highlight the complexities of conducting open-ended research that meets the emergent needs of specific communities of practice

Conferences

Boateng, H. & Narayan, B. 2017, 'Exploring knowledge creation and information sharing within the culturally situated world of Ghana’s traditional Kente community', i3 Conference, Aberdeen Business School Building, Robert Gordon University, Scotland.

Fiske, L.I. & Shackel, R. 2016, 'Effects of conflict-induced displacement on women in DRC, Kenya and Uganda', http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2016/11/families-on-the-move, UN Women. Families on the Move, New York University, Centre for Global Affairs, New York.
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Robert, J.L. 2016, 'A Vacation in a Bottle: Appeals to Travel in French Alcohol Advertising', Australian Society for French Studies, Adelaide.

Robert, J.L. 2016, 'Binge Sobriety in Cross-Cultural and Historical Perspective', Alcohol Flows Across Cultures, Oxford, UK.

Robert, J.L. 2015, 'La Bougeotte et l’errance: French Canadian Travels and Returns', Special Issue of Australian Journal of French Studies, Australian Society for French Studies, Newcastle, NSW.

Sheldon, M.E. 2017, '“Variation in the organization of the Discussion/Conclusion section in Research Articles by English L1, English L2 and Spanish L1 writers”', FACES OF ENGLISH 2: TEACHING AND RESEARCHING ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL ENGLISH - 1-3 June 2017 in Hong Kong., Hong Kong.

Vatsikopoulos, H. 2016, 'The Role of the Media in Public Opinion and Social Cohesion', Australian Council of Social Services Council Conference 2016, Carriage works Redfern.

Non traditional outputs

Prince, M. 2017, 'test'.

Sazdov, R. 2017, 'Dreams of the Jailed Modernist', ZKM.

Vatsikopoulos, H. 2017, 'Exposure 04: Andrew Quilty - Australian Centre for Photography'.

Other

Chan, L. 2017, 'Power, Ideas and Institutions: China’s Emergent Footprints in Global Governance of Development Aid', CSGR Working Paper No. 281/17.
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Fiske, L.I. 2017, 'Refugee Transit in Indonesia: The Critical Importance of Community', Global Observatory.
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Western nations are in retreat from their traditional willingness to take in refugees. Opportunities for refuge are constricting globally, just as the need for them expands. Indonesia currently hosts around 15,000 refugees in transit. Three distinct refugee journeys are emerging, and community makes a world of difference to refugee transit.

Fiske, L.I. & Shackel, R. 2017, 'Internally displaced women: social rupture and political voice', Open Democracy.
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Displacement is social as well as geographical. Women’s welfare and survival depends significantly on their social relationships; displacement destroys this resource.

Prince, M.J. 2017, 'Opportunities of Impact'.

Robert, J.L. 2017, 'Interviewing to Ascertain the Effectiveness of Public Pedagogy in Public Health-Based Philanthropic Challenges', SAGE.
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Research sometimes leads you down unexpected paths. Although not trained as a public health researcher, a passing interest in a curious cultural phenomenon led me to conduct a cross-disciplinary study on a public health topic from an educational point of view. Being new to the field had me approach the background research without preconceptions and with a willingness to go where the literature pointed in terms of methodology. When it pointed toward semi-structured interviews, I quickly confronted the practicalities of using a method with which I was not familiar. The recruitment of participants, sampling bias, the phrasing of my questions, and the basic logistics of conducting interviews while away from one’s home base all presented challenges that needed to be overcome through anticipation, adjustment, or acceptance and acknowledgment of less than ideal circumstances and outcomes. This case presents new researchers with a set of circumstances and responses that can be analyzed in terms of successful and less than optimal responses and affords them the opportunity to think through better approaches to the practicalities of research methodology. It also provides encouragement to take risks in terms of research and research design, albeit with the proviso that such risks are calculated and the decisions informed.