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Books

Darcy, S., Frawley, S. & Adair, D. 2017, Managing the Paralympics, 1, Palgrave Macmillan, London.
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Kenny, S., Taylor, M., Onyx, J.A. & Mayo, M. 2017, Challenging the Third Sector: Global prospects for active citizenship.
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Macnamara, J.R. 2017, Evaluating Public Communication: Exploring New Models, Standards, and Best Practice, Routledge, Abingdon, UK.
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Evaluating Public Communication addresses the widely reported lack of rigorous outcome and impact oriented evaluation in advertising; public relations; corporate, government, political, and organizational communication; and specialist fields such as health communication. This transdisciplinary analysis integrates research literature from each of these fields of practice as well as primary research including interviews, content analysis, and ethnography inside the world of evaluating public communication to identify the latest models and approaches. It presents the most comprehensive analysis undertaken of evaluation of public communication including:   * A review of 30 frameworks and models that inform processes for evaluation in advertising, public relations, health communication, government communication and other specialist fields including the latest recommendations of industry bodies, evaluation councils, and research institutes in several countries such as the Association for Measurement & Evaluation of Communication (AMEC) Integrated Evaluation Framework; the UK Government Communication Service (GCS) Evaluation Framework; the European Commission Directorate-General for Communication evaluation framework; as well as the latest academic models and guidelines for evaluation of public communication; * Recommendations for standards based on contemporary social science research and industry initiatives such as the Task Force for Standardization of Communication Planning and Evaluation Models and the Coalition for Public Relations Research Standards; * A comprehensive review of metrics that can inform evaluation including digital and social media metrics, 10 informal research methods, and more than 30 formal research methods for evaluating public communication; and * A dozen award-winning case studies of evaluation of public communication campaigns and projects.

Morita, K. 2017, Aikoku Fujinkai: Senji Taiseikano Aikoku Fujikai Shakai Katsudo[Series 4-7 Patriotic Ladies' Association, Patriotic Ladies Association under the Total War: Social Activities), Taiyo Shobo, Japan.

Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. 2017, Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon.
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Critical Issues in Global Sport Management will provide researchers, students and practitioners with a collection of chapters that examine the latest concepts and challenges faced by the global sport industry. The book identifies and evaluates current issues and complexities faced by those charged with the responsibility of managing sport in compound business contexts as well as intricate social environments.

Schwabenland, C., Lange, C., Nakagawa, S. & Onyx, J.A. 2017, Emancipating Women: The Role of Civil Society, Policy Press, University of Bristol.
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Women are at the heart of civil society organisations. Through them they have achieved many successes, challenged oppressive practices at a local and global level and have developed outstanding entrepreneurial activities. Yet Civil Service Organisation (CSO) research tends to ignore considerations of gender and the rich history of activist feminist organisations is rarely examined. This collection examines the nexus between the emancipation of women, and their role(s) in these organisations. Featuring contrasting studies from a wide range of contributors from different parts of the world, it covers emerging issues such as the role of social media in organising, the significance of religion in many cultural contexts, activism in Eastern Europe and the impact of environmental degradation on women’s lives. Asking whether involvement in CSOs offers a potential source of emancipation for women or maintains the status quo, this anthology will also have an impact on policy and practice in relation to equal opportunities. - See more at: https://policypress.co.uk/womens-emancipation-and-civil-society-organisations#sthash.VYLMtUOk.dpuf

Chapters

Adair, D. 2017, 'Anti-doping for Paralympians' in Darcy, S., Frawley, S. & Adair, D. (eds), Managing the Paralympics, Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 131-152.
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This book critically examines the planning, management, and operations of the world’s premier event for Para sport athletes.

Baker, R., Danylchuk, K., Gillentine, A., Jonson, P., Pitts, B. & Zhang, J. 2017, 'Internationalized sport management education: bridging the gaps' in Pitts, B. & Zhang, J. (eds), Global sport management: contemporary issues and inquiries, Routledge, New York, pp. 18-37.

Clark, A.H. & Elmersjö, H.Å. 2017, 'Epistemology of Rival Histories' in Clark, A. & Elmersjö, H.Å. (eds), International Perspectives on Teaching Rival Histories: Pedagogical Responses to Contested Narratives and the History Wars, Springer, London, pp. 1-14.
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Part I, “Historical cultures and national histories,” consists of three chapters. ... hopeful, showcasing the limits, rather than the possibilities, of “teachers' in conflict-affected societies [propensity] to engage with rival histories in integrated settings.

Darcy, S., Adair, D. & Frawley, S. 2017, 'Paralympic Paradigm: A Research Agenda' in Managing the Paralympics, Palgrave Macmillan, London, pp. 287-293.
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Darcy, S., Frawley, S.M. & Adair 2017, 'The Paralympic Games: Managerial and StrategicDirections' in Managing the Paralympics, The Campus, 4 Crinan Street, London, N1 9XW, United Kingdom, pp. 1-20.
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Darcy, S.A. 2017, 'Accessibility as a Key Management Component of the Paralympics', The Campus, 4 Crinan Street, London, N1 9XW, United Kingdom, pp. 47-90.
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Darcy, S.A. & Almond, B. 2017, 'Case study: Sydney’s 'Cultural Ribbon' (Australia)' in Aragall, F., Neumann, P. & Sagramola, S. (eds), Design for All in Tourist Destinations ECA 2017, EuCAN – European Concept for Accessibility Network, pp. 78-83.
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Ghosh, D. & Jain, A. 2017, 'Green marketing and green consciousness in India' in Green Asia: Ecocultures, sustainable lifestyles, and ethical consumption, Routledge.

Ghosh, D. & Jain, A. 2017, 'Green marketing and green consciousness in India' in Lewis, T. (ed), Green Asia: Ecocultures, sustainable lifestyles, and ethical consumption, Routledge.
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Jakubowicz, A.H. 2017, 'Unplanned stay: how the Polish Jews became refugees in Shanghai in 1941 (Jìhuà wài de dòuliú:1941 Nián bōlán yóutàirén rúhé zài shànghǎi lún wéi nànmín)' in Pan, G., Zhang, J., Chen, X. & Zhang, Y. (eds), Jewish Refugees and China: Sources on Jewish refugees in China Vol. IV Academic Perspectives, Shanghai Jiaotong University Press, pp. 29-37.

Macnamara, J. & Kenning, G. 2017, '“Stoner Sloth”: Lessons from Evaluation of Social Media and Virality' in VanSlyke Turk, J. & Valin, J. (eds), Public Relations Case Studies from Around the World (2nd Edition), Peter Lang.
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Macnamara, J.R. 2017, 'Digital and social media communication' in Tench, R. & Yeomans, L. (eds), Exploring Public Relations: Global Strategic Communication, Pearson, Harlow, UK, pp. 35-59.
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This chapter: Identifies and discusses communication and media theories that inform understanding of social media and their use; Critiques social media practices in the context of communication and media theories; Identifies the opportunities as well as the risks and dysfunctions of social media; and Informs readers on how to apply social media in public relations practice.

Onyx, J.A. 2017, 'Community development and governance: An Australian example' in Kenny, B., McGrath, B. & Phillips, R. (eds), The Routledge Handbook of Community Development, Routledge, New York.

Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. 2017, 'Critical Issues in Global Sport' in Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 1-6.
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In this introductory chapter, we provide the background, purpose and context for Critical Issues in Global Sport Management. In the remaining 19 chapters of this book we invite readers to explore, learn, discuss and reflect on the latest concepts, issues and trends in managing sport.

Schulenkorf, N. & Frawley, S. 2017, 'Current trends and future research challenges in global sport management' in Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 278-285.
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In this final chapter of Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, we as editors reflect on a number of the key debates highlighted in the book. Moreover, with the use of practical examples, we critically discuss how current issues, challenges, and emerging trends in global sport are likely to develop in the future.

Schulenkorf, N., Schlenker, K. & Thomson, A. 2017, 'Event Leverage and Sport Mega-Events' in Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 139-149.
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In this chapter we will illustrate the significance of sport event leverage in the context of large-scale and sport mega-events. We first introduce the different areas of event leverage, and then discuss the specific strategies and tactics related to the concept. We provide case studies to illustrate sport event leverage in practice, and highlight challenges and limitations.

Schulenkorf, N., Sherry, E. & Rowe, K. 2017, 'Global sport-for-development' in Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, Routledge, pp. 176-191.
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In this chapter, we aim to familiarise students with sport-for-development (SFD) by providing a review of the SFD literature. We base this chapter on a recently conducted integrated literature review that synthesised all SFD research studies published between 2000 and 2014 (see Schulenkorf, Sherry and Rowe, 2016). In particular, we present the status quo of SFD activity in relation to the research foci, authorship, journal outlets, dates of publication, geographical contexts, thematic areas, sport activities, and research methodologies. Based on this review, we will reflect on the implications of SFD as an emerging area of research and provide recommendations for future work in the field.

Small, J. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Expanding Understanding: Using the “Choraster” to Provide a Voice for the Female Traveler' in Khoo-Lattimore, C. & Wilson, E. (eds), Women and Travel: Trends, Journeys and Experiences, Apple Academic Press, New Jersey.

Taylor, T.L. 2017, 'Human Resource Management' in Hoye, R. & Parent, M. (eds), The Sage Handbook of Sport Management, SAGE, United Kingdom, pp. 62-84.
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Taylor, T.L. & Morgan, A. 2017, 'Managing volunteers in grassroots sport' in Bradbury, T. & O'Boyle, I. (eds), Understanding Sport Management International Perspectives, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 130-144.
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Thomson, A., Schlenker, K., Schulenkorf, N. & Brooking, E. 2017, 'The Social and Environmental Consequences of Hosting Mega-Sport Events' in Frawley, S. (ed), Managing Sport Mega-Events, Routledge, Abingdon, pp. 150-164.
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The social and environmental consequences of sport mega-events have become increasingly important when trying to understand the benefits and costs of hosting such events for cities and their residents. Thus, event bids and related marketing campaigns often tell us about the benefits that mega-events may bestow on host cities, such as community pride, enhanced community cohesion and/or urban regeneration. However, many intangible, or soft, opportunities are not always backed up by evidence, or underpinned by an adequate understanding of how these outcomes are realised. This chapter presents an overview of recent research in the areas of social and environmental consequences of mega-events, including: a) civic pride and community cohesion; b) urban regeneration and displacement effects; and c) environmental impacts and legacies.

Vanni Accarigi, I. 2017, 'Transcultural objects, transcultural homes' in Lloyd, J. & Vasta, E. (eds), Reimagining Home in the 21st Century., Elgar, Cheltenham, pp. 192-206.
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In a world increasingly characterized by mobility the idea of what constitutes home has changed dramatically. In its various meaning of family, unit of belonging, locality and even in its geopolitical sense as nation, home is now understood in a transnational and translocal sense. Building on this understanding, this chapter focuses on the concept of home as practiced. The idea of home is considered as a continuous process, which includes people, things, affects, senses, and which extricates the idea of home from the idea of place, of origin or of arrival. This chapter furthers the analysis of homing practices by analyzing the role of objects in the daily life of a group of professional migrant women. Together the stories of these objects generate the argument that ‘home’ is a process, or a set of processes, made of things, practices, language, memory, affects, sensoria and people. By taking four stories as its as its point of departure, this chapter argues that the sense of ‘being at home’ or of belonging to somewhere, in the context of transnational mobility is dissociated from a geographical location and replaced by belonging through everyday practices engender by specific objects.

Varnham, S. 2017, 'Education Law in Aotearoa New Zealand' in Russo, C.J. (ed), Handbook of Education Law: Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Rowman & Littlefield Education, Maryland, US.
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Examination of the increasing recognition of the impact of law on education in Aotearoa New Zealand and analysis of current exercise of the right to education as fundamental to the welfare of New Zealand and its society.

Varnham, S. 2017, 'Education Law in Aotearoa New Zealand' in Comparative Legal Issues in Elementary and Secondary Education, Rowman & Littlefield, Maryland, US.
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Analysis of the increasing impact of law on the organisation and delivery of compulsory education in New Zealand, and comparative discussion of the exercise of the right to and rights in education

Walker, J.R. & Cooper, M. 2017, 'Resilience' in Castree, N., Hulme, M. & Proctor, J. (eds), The Companion to Environmental Studies, Routledge, London.

Walker, J.R. & Cooper, M. 2017, 'Resilience' in Braidotti, R. (ed), The Posthumanities Reader, Bloomsbury, London.

Wearing, S.L. & Wearing, M. 2017, 'Eco-tourism or Eco-utilitarianism – exploring the new debates in Eco-tourism' in Williams, P. (ed), Special Interest Tourism: Concepts, Contexts and Cases, CABI, Oxon.
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Wearing, S.L. & Wearing, M. (in press 2016) ‘Eco-tourism or Eco-utilitarianism – exploring the new debates in Eco-tourism. , in Paul Williams (eds) Special Interest Tourism: Concepts, Contexts and Cases, CABI, Oxon, UK. https://cab.presswarehouse.com/books/bookdetail.aspx?productid=473983.

Wearing, S.L., Small, J. & Foley, C. 2017, 'Leisure and Gender Relations' in Mansfield, Caudwell, Watson & Wheaton (eds), The Handbook of Feminisms in Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, Palgrave MacMillan.

Wearing, S.L., Wearing, M. & Jobberns, C. 2017, 'Munch Crunch its Whale for Lunch: Exploring the politics of Japanese Whaling' in Animals as Food: Ethical Implications for Tourism.
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Wearing, S.L., Wearing, M. & Jobberns, C. (in progress 2017) Munch Crunch its Whale for Lunch: Exploring the politics of Japanese Whaling, Carol S. Kline, Animals as Food: Ethical Implications for Tourism.

Journal articles

Adair, D., Pearce, S., Maxwell, H. & Stronach, M. 2017, 'Indigenous Australian women and sport: Findings and recommendations from a parliamentary inquiry', Sport in Society.
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Adair, D., Westberg, K., Stavros, C., Smith, A.C.T., Newton, J., Lindsay, S., Kelly, S. & Beus, S. 2017, 'Exploring the wicked problem of athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport', Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1-36.
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Barclay, K., Voyer, M., Mazur, N., Payne, A.M., Mauli, S., Kinch, J., Fabinyi, M. & Smith, G. 2017, 'The importance of qualitative social research for effective fisheries management', Fisheries Research, vol. 186, pp. 426-438.
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© 2016Over recent decades it has become widely accepted that managing fisheries resources means managing human behaviour, and so understanding social and economic dynamics is just as important as understanding species biology and ecology. Until recently, fisheries managers and researchers have struggled to develop effective methods and data for social and economic analysis that can integrate with the predominantly biological approaches to fisheries management. The field is now growing fast, however, and globally, researchers are developing and testing new methods. This paper uses three divergent case studies to demonstrate the value of using qualitative social science approaches to complement more conventional quantitative methods to improve the knowledge base for fisheries management. In all three cases, qualitative interview and document review methods enabled broad surveying to explore the research questions in particular contexts and identified where quantitative tools could be most usefully applied. In the first case (the contribution of commercial fisheries to coastal communities in eastern Australia), a wellbeing analysis identified the social benefits from particular fisheries, which can be used to identify the social impacts of different fisheries management policies. In the second case (a gender analysis of fisheries of small islands in the Pacific), analysis outlined opportunities and constraints along fisheries supply chains, illuminated factors inhibiting community development and identified ecological factors that are typically overlooked in conventional fisheries management. In the third case (sea cucumber fisheries in Papua New Guinea), an interactive governance analysis assessed how well fisheries management tools fit the ecological, social and economic reality of the fishery and the trade in its products, including market influences and stakeholder values. The qualitative approach adopted in these three case studies adds a new dimension to under...

Cheng, M., Edwards, D., Darcy, S. & Redfern, K.A. 2017, 'A tri-method approach to a review of adventure tourism literature: bibliometric analysis, content analysis and a quantitative systematic literature review', Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Research.
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This paper provides an objective, systematic and integrated review of the Western academic literature on adventure tourism to discover the theoretical foundations and key themes underlying the field by combining three complementary approaches of bibliometric analysis, content analysis and a quantitative systematic review. Some 114 publications on adventure tourism were identified that revealed three broad areas of foci with adventure tourism research: (1) adventure tourism experience, (2) destination planning and development, and (3) adventure tourism operators. Adventure tourism has an intellectual tradition from multiple disciplines, such as the social psychology of sport and recreation. There is an under-representation of studies examining non-Western tourists in their own geographic contexts or non-Western tourists in Western geographic contexts. Our findings pave ways for developing a more robust framework and holistic understanding of the adventure tourism field.

Cheng, M., Wong, A., Wearing, S.L. & McDonald, M. 2017, 'Ecotourism social media initiatives in China', Journal of Sustainable Tourism, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 416-432.
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The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of social media by ecotourism management agencies and how this potentially changes the relationship between the ecotourist and the natural environment. It examines the meaning of ecotourism and the way that social media shapes visitor perceptions and meaning through an examination of the content of 775 Sina microblog postings from five leading ecotourism site management agencies in China. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the social media postings, a series of semi-structured interviews was also conducted with followers and management agencies. The findings provide an enhanced understanding of ecotourism marketing and its impacts on the ecotourist while also creating a framework for the use of social media to market ecotourism. The framework outlines the importance of the meanings associated with this form of communication through its promotional appeal to tourists and the outcomes for both the ecotourist and site management.

Clark, A.H. 2017, 'The Place of Anzac in Australian Historical Consciousness', Australian Historical Studies, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 19-34.
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There is an ever-greater popular attachment to the commemoration of Anzac Day in Australia, with growing commercial, popular and institutional support around the country. This resurgence has also generated significant disagreement among historians, shaping the historiography of Anzac in recent years and raising important questions about Australia’s current obsession with Anzac: is it a reflection of increasing popular historical engagement, or an ideologically driven ‘mobilisation’ of the past? While various scholars have sought to unpack and understand this potent phenomenon of national sentiment, this article, based on a series of oral interviews with ordinary Australians in selected communities, reveals an uncertainty and complexity in many vernacular responses to Anzac that need to be included if that commemorative sentiment is to be properly understood.

Darcy, S.A., Lock, D. & Taylor, T. 2017, 'Enabling Inclusive Sport Participation: Effects of Disability and Support Needs on Constraints to Sport Participation', Leisure Sciences: an interdisciplinary journal, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 20-41.
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Framed by a social approach to disability and leisure constraints theory, this paper presents the results of a national study examining the constraints to sport participation for people with disability. Responses were obtained from a multi-platform questionnaire survey capturing data on constraints to participation, dimensions of disability, and level of support needs. The Exploratory Factor Analysis identified five structural together with intrapersonal and interpersonal constraint factors. While intrapersonal and interpersonal considerations were found to constrain sport participation and nonparticipation, the five structural factors had the most significant constraining impact on sport participation. The findings showed that disability type and level of support needs explain significant variations in constraints to participation and nonparticipation. When the 2-Way MANOVA included type of disability and level of support needs as contingent independent variables, the level of support needs was the most significant indicator of the likelihood of having constraints to participation or nonparticipation

Darcy, S.A., Maxwell, H & Green, J. 2017, 'I’ve Got a Mobile Phone Too! Hard and Soft Assistive Technology Customisation and Supportive Call Centres For People with Disability', Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology.
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Dickson, T., Misener, L. & Darcy, S.A. 2017, 'Enhancing destination competitiveness through disability sport event legacies: developing an interdisciplinary typology', International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management.
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Edwards, D., Cheng, M., Wong, A., Zhang, J. & Wu, Q. 2017, 'Ambassadors of Knowledge Sharing: Co-produced Travel Information Through Tourist-Local Social Media Exchange', International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 690-708.
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Purpose: The aim of this study is to understand the knowledge sharing structure and co-production of trip-related knowledge through online travel forums. Design/methodology/approach: The travel forum threads were collected from TripAdvisor Sydney travel forum for the period from 2010 to 2014, which contains 115,847 threads from 8,346 conversations. The data analytical technique was based on a novel methodological approach - visual analytics including semantic pattern generation and network analysis. Findings: Findings indicate that the knowledge structure is created by community residents who camouflage as local experts, serve as ambassadors of a destination. The knowledge structure presents collective intelligence co-produced by community residents and tourists. Further findings reveal how these community residents associate with each other and form a knowledge repertoire with information covering various travel domain areas. Practical implications: The study offers valuable insights to help destination management organizations and tour operators identify existing and emerging tourism issues to achieve a competitive destination advantage. Originality/value: This study highlights the process of social media mediated travel knowledge co-production. It also discovers how community residents engage in reaching out to tourists by camouflaging as ordinary users.

Fee, A., Heizmann, H. & Gray, S.J. 2017, 'Towards a theory of effective cross-cultural capacity development: the experiences of Australian international NGO expatriates in Vietnam', The International Journal of Human Resource Management.
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Capacity development (CD) partnerships between highly qualified expatriates and host-country counterparts are a commonly used tool by non-government organisations (NGOs) working in international development. This article reports on an empirical investigation of the factors contributing to the effectiveness of these interpersonal cross-cultural CD relationships. Using a variant of the critical incident technique, we explored 40 such relationships (20 effective and 20 ineffective) reported by 20 expatriates from an Australian international NGO who were embedded in international and domestic NGOs and government organisations in Vietnam. From our analysis, we propose a theoretical model that identifies the features of effective cross-cultural CD relationships. The model is intended to lay the foundation for future research as well as strategic action by organisations. It identifies shared trust between expatriate and counterpart as central to effective CD, supported by five enabling conditions relating to the perceptions, abilities and attitudes of participants, the way the work roles are structured, and the way that leaders in the host organisations manage the context of the relationship.

Foley, C. 2017, 'The art of wasting time: sociability, friendship, community and holidays', Leisure Studies, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 1-20.
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© 2015 Taylor & Francis Slow tourism is motivated by the desire for personal and communal well-being. It emerged as an antidote to the fast-paced imperatives of global capitalism that urge the entrepreneurial self to speed up and work harder to achieve and demonstrate desired social status. The entrepreneurial self can be understood in the contexts of neoliberalism and the class- and gender-based histories of time-thrift and rational recreation; the entrepreneurial self uses leisure time purposively in the pursuit of status, avoids idle pursuits and has restricted capacity to experience leisurely social relationships. In this article, it is argued that leisurely social relations can be reclaimed by letting go, even temporarily, of time-thrift and the compulsion to use leisure time purposively. Data drawn from in-depth interviews with repeat visitors at two Australian caravan parks revealed that for the period of their holiday the tourists relax, refuse to be driven by schedules, socialise with other tourists and feel no compulsion to use time purposively. The key reasons the tourists return to the parks each year were for the friendships and the sense of community they experience as part of the holiday. Slow tourism by its very nature rejects time-thrift, however, as the movement is harnessed by global capitalism, slow tourism risks becoming a source of conspicuous consumption. The findings of this study suggest that friendship and community thrive more readily in conditions where the need to achieve and demonstrate social status is discarded along with time-thrift.

Foley, C., Faulkner, S., Small, J. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Women of the Kokoda: From Poverty to Empowerment in Sustainable Tourism Development', Tourism, Culture and Communication.

Gills, B.K., Goodman, J. & Hosseini, S.A.H. 2017, 'Theorizing alternatives to capital: Towards a critical cosmopolitanist framework1', European Journal of Social Theory.
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Heizmann, H. & Fox, S. 2017, 'O Partner, Where Art Thou? A critical discursive analysis of HR managers’ struggle for legitimacy', The International Journal of Human Resource Management.
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This study of HRM in an Australian insurance firm applies a critical discursive perspective to examine HR managers’ attempts to position themselves as Human Resources Business Partners. Analysing semi-structured interviews, we aim to provide a situated understanding of HR managers’ experiences as they sought to become accepted as co-equal partners by line management. Our findings draw attention to the gap between prescriptive accounts of HR Business Partnering and the tensions and legitimacy struggles HR managers face when adopting their new roles. We show the impact of line management’s resistance to HRM and the concomitant need for HR managers to legitimate their position in a new way. The introduction of an organizational culture survey, in particular, supplemented discursive attempts to promote the change amongst line managers and constituted a key driver in the process. Our study contributes to the study of HRM change by showing how the shift to an HRM business partnership model can be a precarious accomplishment: (1) enacted through the interweaving of discursive and socio-material practices, and (2) subject to the constraints of existing organisational power/knowledge relations.

Henninger, M. 2017, 'Government information: Literacies, behaviors and practices', Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices, vol. 1, pp. 8-15.
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The current trend in the delivery of government information online is predicated on the belief that it will enable improvements in the provision of government services and citizens' participation in democratic processes. Government policy in this matter is wrapped in the rhetoric of public accessibility, that is, it must be easy to find, to access and to use. This paper draws upon a case study to explore the validity of this rhetoric; it uses Pierre Bourdieu's concept of society as a metaphorical game in which different players, government and citizens, play with different rules, a situation that can result in mismatches and conflicts in expectations and beliefs. Societal understanding of accessibility to government information is more nuanced and multidimensional than accessibility as an institutional practice within government departments, and requires high levels of digital and civic literacies. The case study findings demonstrate that accessibility did not meet the expectations of a group of university students who were both digitally and civically literate but were not able to find documents mandated to be published. The research concludes that there is a gap between the assumptions of the providers of government information and the expectations of their users; this disparity raises issues of social justice that will need to be bridged if government policies for online information delivery are to fulfil their objectives and rhetoric

Hosseini, S.A.H., Gills, B.K. & Goodman, J. 2017, 'Toward Transversal Cosmopolitanism: Understanding Alternative Praxes in the Global Field of Transformative Movements', Globalizations, pp. 1-18.
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© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis article critically reflects on theoretical dilemmas of conceptualizing recent ideological shifts and contention among global transformative movements. Some studies conceptualize these movements as ideologically mature and coherent, while other inquiries highlight disorganization, fragmentation, disillusion, and dispute. The former line of argument suggests that underlying emerging global solidarities—to the extent they genuinely exist—there are some identifiably coherent cosmopolitanist, or globalist, values. The latter claim that existing global justice and transformative movements lack an effective ideological position for uniting the masses behind a global (political) project for transforming global capitalist social relations. By drawing upon an interpretive review of empirical studies conducted throughout the last decade, the article delineates four modalities, defined in terms of their orientations toward cosmopolitanist values. Among these modalities is a new and promising one, termed here as ‘transversal cosmopolitanist’ (‘transversal’ here understood as a process verb, indicating a new form of cosmopolitanist praxis). This approach assumes the possibility of creating a common ground for fruitful dialogue, constructive collective learning, progressive hybridization, and active political cooperation among diverse identities and ideological visions of contemporary global transformative movements, against existing capitalist social relations and structures of domination.

Jung, K., Dalton, B. & Willis, J. 2017, 'From revolutionary mother, to breadwinner, to the hyper-feminine woman: Fashion andthe social construction of femininity in North Korea', Asian Studies Review.
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In this paper we argue that North Korea’s socioeconomic transformation has had a profound and yet under-appreciated impact on the social construction of femininity. Drawing on forty-five in-depth interviews with North Korean refugees, interviews with regular visitors to North Korea and NGO workers, as well as our own field notes from trips to North Korea, we analyse changes over three discernible (yet overlapping) economic periods: the 1960s-1990s pre-famine period; the mid-1990s to late 2000s grassroots capitalism era; and the current Kim Jong Un period of quasi-capitalism. As dress is a discursive daily practice of gender, we focus on the practice of femininity as shown through North Korean women’s fashion choices. We argue that images of women in state propaganda have been shaped primarily by male leaders, but norms of femininity have shaped, and also been shaped by, women themselves. That is, the recent trend for North Korean women to dress in hyper-feminine styles can be explained in terms of women remaking themselves and planning their future lives.

Macnamara, J.R. & Likely, F. 2017, 'Revisiting the disciplinary home of evaluation: New perspectives to inform PR evaluation standards', Research Journal of the Institute for Public Relations, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 1-21.
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From historical analysis of the early development of public relations evaluation (early 1980s to the early 2000s), this paper shows that public relations scholarship and practice have drawn heavily on media and communication studies in developing models and methods of evaluation, but have not significantly engaged with the large related body of knowledge on program evaluation. While communication and media studies are logical and formative disciplinary homes for public relations (PR), this paper argues that PR is a transdisciplinary field and that program evaluation is a mostly overlooked source of influence and heritage in relation to evaluation. This analysis presents evidence that a disciplinary ‘home visit’ to program evaluation, which nestles within program theory and theory of change, offers much to overcome the long-standing stasis in PR evaluation and to inform the search for standards.

Macnamara, J.R. & Zerfass, A. 2017, 'Evaluation stasis continues in PR and corporate communication: Asia Pacific insights into causes', Communication Research and Practice, pp. 1-16.
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The first comprehensive study of public relations (PR) and corporate communication practices across Asia-Pacific countries has found that, despite being an area of rapid growth, evaluation remains limited, is often not based on reliable research methods, and is focussed on outputs rather than the outcomes of communication. This reflects a worldwide stasis in evaluation of PR that has been identified as problematic by a number of authors. The Asia-Pacific Communication Monitor, a survey-based study conducted by a collaboration of 16 universities across 23 Asia-Pacific countries in 2015, also explored practitioners’ skills, and found a significant lag that could account for this stasis. This article reports key findings of this study that contribute insights to address the lack of measurement and evaluation in the growing field of PR that remains a major concern in the academy and industry.

Martin, G. 2017, 'Scaling critical pedagogy in higher education', Critical Studies in Education, no. 1, pp. 1-18.
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Across the globe, neoliberal reforms have produced effects in the higher education sector that are multiple, convergent and embodied or performed. In this context, a growing number of activist-scholars, from a range of disciplines, have explored the role of critical pedagogy within the space of the classroom. Yet, persistent critiques and challenges suggest that the field of critical pedagogy needs to build upon a richer set of theoretical and practical insights. While the discipline of geography has proven to be a generative source of learning and renewal, a recurring tendency exists within the educational literature to treat the key geographical concept of scale as a discrete, pre-given unit of analysis. Consequently, scale remains largely under-theorised and misunderstood leading to simplistic binary oppositions and choices. This binary filter underpins a comfortable but problematic ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ paradigm. Drawing upon contentious debates in the field of geography, this paper explores how the intersections between diverse spatial concepts, including scale, might be strategically deployed to rework the spatial imaginings of critical pedagogy.

McDonald, M., Gough, B., Deville, A. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Social Psychology, Consumer Culture & Neoliberal Political Economy', Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour.

McDonald, M., Wearing, S.L. & Wearing, S.L. 2017, 'Normalising ‘Staged Authenticity’ in Tourism: neoliberal governmentality and tourist encounters', Tourism Analysis.

Narayan, B. 2017, 'aa'.

Narayan, B. & Luca, E. 2017, 'Utiliser le design thinking pour repenser la signalétique en bibliothèque universitaire', i2d: Information, données & documents, vol. 54, no. 1.
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Déambuler sans but d’un rayonnage à l’autre peut être une expérience agréable, mais lorsqu’on est peu familier des bibliothèques, on peut facilement être désorienté par leurs richesses. Une bonne signalétique permet au public de trouver son chemin. En revanche, une signalétique incohérente ou mal conçue fait fuir les usagers. Le design thinking permet de traiter cette question.

Olsson, M.R. 2017, 'Being in place: embodied information practices', Information Research: an international electronic journal, vol. 22, no. 1.
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Introduction. The concept of embodied information practices and the implications for research and professional practice are examined drawing from the authors’ empirical studies of people engaged in professional and everyday practices. The authors suggest that information behaviour research’s focus on individual cognition has led our field to overlook the important role that embodied practices play in individual and collective sense-making. Method. Conceptual paper that draws from a number of qualitatively framed research projects, which explore the role of information practices in knowledge construction. Conclusions. Empirical studies which focus on non-linguistic and embodied practices may appear removed from the Library and Information Science agenda, however these should become increasingly routine, because they provide the research field with a source of information about how people engage with the non-normative aspects of everyday life and learn from others to inform their practices.

Onyx, J.A., Darcy, S., Grabowski, S., Green, J. & Maxwell, H. 2017, 'Researching the social impact of arts and disability: Applying a new empirical tool and method', Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations.
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Perey, R., Agarwal, R., Benn, S. & Edwards, M. 2017, 'The Place of Waste: Changing business value for the circular economy', Business Strategy and the Environment, no. Special issue.

Porter, D., wearing, S., McCauley, B., Wearing, M. & Foley, C.T. 2017, 'Exploring Male Adolescent Video Gaming as Leisure Consumption: It’s not as simple as ‘Bang Bang: You’re dead!’', Leisure Studies.

Schulenkorf, N. & Schlenker, K. 2017, 'Leveraging Sport Events to Maximize Community Benefits in Low- and Middle-Income Countries', Event Management, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 217-231.
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Small, J.J. 2017, 'Women's "beach body" in Australian women's magazines', Annals of Tourism Research, vol. 63, no. March, pp. 23-33.
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Small, J.J., Harris, C. & Wilson, E. 2017, 'Gender on the Agenda? The Position of Gender in Tourism’s High Ranking Journals', Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, vol. 31, no. June, pp. 114-117.
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Walker, J.R. & Granjou, C. 2017, 'MELiSSA the minimal biosphere: human life, waste and refuge in deep space', Futures.
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MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a long-term technology program of the European Space Agency. Its aim is to construct autonomous habitats in deep space, supplying astronauts with fresh air, water and food through continuous microbial recycling of human wastes. This article considers how anticipated futures of space travel and environmental survival are materialized in the project to engineer the minimal biosphere capable of reliably sustaining human life: a human/microbe association with the fewest possible species. We locate MELiSSA within a history of bio-infrastructures associated with colonisation projects: refugia in which organisms dislocated from their originary habitats are preserved. Analysis of MELiSSA’s sewage-composting technology suggests that the disordering complexity of human waste presents a formidable “bottle-neck” for the construction of the minimal biosphere, in turn suggesting our dependence on microbial communities (soil, the human gut) of potentially irreducible biocomplexity. MELiSSA researchers think of themselves as pragmatic enablers of space exploration, yet a wider family of space colonisation projects are now imagined in terms of the prospect that the Earth might cease to function as the minimal biosphere capable of supporting civilisation. MELiSSA’s politics of anticipation are paradoxical, promising technologies with which to escape from the Earth and through which it may be sustained.

Walker, J.R. & Granjou, C. 2017, 'The Faecal Frontier: Miniaturising the Biosphere and Managing Waste in Deep Space', Wildlife Australia, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 18-21.
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Walker, J.R., Granjou, C. & Salazar, J.F. 2017, 'The Politics of Anticipation: On Knowing and Governing Environmental Futures', Futures.
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In this article we describe how the historical emergence and rise of future studies, since the founding issue of Futures in 1968, has been intricately connected to the emergence and development of environmental anticipation as discourse and practice. We trace a dialectical and inter-twined relationship between technologies of environmental anticipation and forecasting, and technologies of anti-environmentalist anticipation and counter-intervention, one which we argue shapes not only the contemporary politics of anticipation, but in a very material sense, the future conditions of biological and social life on Earth. In so doing we want to address the possible contributions that the field of futures studies can make to to reimagining collective agency and ways of being on Earth, whilst reflecting critically upon its genealogical relations to the political reason and strategic horizons of powerful fossil fuel interests, from the crisis of the 1970s to the present. The article also introduces this special issue of Futures on “The Politics of Environmental Anticipation” with the aim to bring to the fore the role that social scientists play in environmental anticipation – ie. drawing attention to the fact that the future could always have been otherwise. As a whole, this stimulating collection of eight original articles provides a critical assessment of a range of sites where varied and conflicting politics of environmental anticipation are constituted and resisted.

Conferences

Anwar, T., Al-Jumaily, A. & Watsford, M. 2017, 'Estimation of Torque Based on EMG using ANFIS', Procedia Computer Science, pp. 197-202.
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© 2017 The Authors.There are wide verities of possible human movements that involve a range from the gait for the lifting of a load by a factory worker to the performance of a superior athlete. Output of the movement can be described by a large number of kinematic variables like knee joint angle, torque. This paper proposes a system that contains a non-parametric model with EMG signal of two muscles is used as input to estimate torque. The mapping of EMG to any joint dynamics is very subject dependent. It also depends on walking, running, jumping or climbing. Each type of posture consists of combination of isometric, eccentric and concentric type of muscle contraction with different intensity level depending on velocity, angle and lifted weight (muscle activation level). To capture the EMG signal pattern which is complex and so dynamic in time and space, an adaptive feature in computational intelligence is desired which will not only learn but also make decision based on EMG channel signal pattern to estimate torque. The EMG signal has been collected from volunteer who has completed the knee joint extension with maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) at different degree/sec ranging from 5deg/Sec to 360deg/Sec. The volunteer was also asked to perform extension with moderate and low effort against different impedance like 5deg/Sec, 20deg/Sec, and 45deg/Sec. RMS feature along with 2nd order digital filter has been used to smooth the raw EMG signal. The proposed study is intended to explore an ANFIS like Neuro-Fuzzy type knowledge based adaptive network with embedded RBF kernel neuron to estimate torque.

Boateng, H. & Narayan, B. 2017, 'Exploring knowledge creation and information sharing within the culturally situated world of Ghana’s traditional Kente community', i3 Conference, Aberdeen Business School Building, Robert Gordon University, Scotland.

Fiske, L.I. & Shackel, R. 2016, 'Effects of conflict-induced displacement on women in DRC, Kenya and Uganda', http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2016/11/families-on-the-move, UN Women. Families on the Move, New York University, Centre for Global Affairs, New York.
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Other

Fiske, L.I. 2017, 'Refugee Transit in Indonesia: The Critical Importance of Community', Global Observatory.
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Western nations are in retreat from their traditional willingness to take in refugees. Opportunities for refuge are constricting globally, just as the need for them expands. Indonesia currently hosts around 15,000 refugees in transit. Three distinct refugee journeys are emerging, and community makes a world of difference to refugee transit.

Fiske, L.I. & Shackel, R. 2017, 'Internally displaced women: social rupture and political voice', Open Democracy.
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Displacement is social as well as geographical. Women’s welfare and survival depends significantly on their social relationships; displacement destroys this resource.