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Journal articles

AUSTIN, M.P., CUNNINGHAM, R.B. & GOOD, R.B. 1983, 'Altitudinal distribution of several eucalypt species in relation to other environmental factors in southern New South Wales', Australian Journal of Ecology, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 169-180.
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Four problems associated with studying the altitudinal distribution of eucalypt species are examined: the lack of specific physiological relationship between altitude and plant growth, the influence of other environmental factors, the availability of suitable data and the need for statistical analysis. Presence/absence data for eucalypt species were obtained from several sources. Probability of occurrence in 100 m zones is determined for E. maculata, E. muellerana, E. fastigata, E. sieberi, E. dalrympleana and E. pauciflora. The influence of other factors is demonstrated for several species using direct gradient analysis. Aspect is important for E. fastigata and E. rossii in addition to altitude and rainfall. The statisical model used was the logit‐linear model: log (p/I– p) = linear function of environmental variables where p is the expected probability of being present for a given combination of environmental variables. Two examples are presented. E. dalrympleana can be predicted from altitude, rainfall, radiation index (measure of aspect) and an interaction term between altitude and aspect. E. rossii presence is predicted by altitude, rainfall, radiation index and geology. Altitude is transformed into an estimate of mean annual temperature which is shown to clarify some overlaps of species distribution. It is concluded that use of data collected for other purposes can be used in a generalized linear model for presence data to show the complex correlations which exist between the altitudinal distribution of some eucalypts and other environmental factors. Copyright © 1983, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

Austin, M.P., Cunningham, R.B. & Wood, J.T. 1983, 'The subgeneric composition of eucalypt forest stands in a region of South-Eastern Australia', Australian Journal of Botany, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 63-71.
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Pryor’s rule that mixed stands of eucalypt forest consist of species from different subgeneric groups was tested statistically using data from a vegetation survey of part of the South Coast of New South Wales. The plot data were stratified by environmental regions, and expressed in terms of the subgeneric combinations of the two most abundant tree species. The categories recognized were the eucalypt subgenera Monocalyptus, Symphyomyrtus and Corymbia, plus Angophora and others. The results suggest that: (a) subgenera are characteristic of certain environmental regions; (b) combinations of subgenera are not random; (c) a modification of Pryor’s rule is applicable to three of the four regions studied; and (d) in addition, certain combinations of subgenera occur more frequently than expected by chance, e.g. Monocalyptus occurs as the most abundant species, with Symphomyrtus as subordinate, more frequently than the reverse situation. The results accord with recent reviews of eucalypt forest ecology but there are many plots with a composition of three species from the same subgenus. Biological explanations for Pryor’s rule must also take account of these exceptions and the tendency for Symphyomyrtus species to be subdominant to Monocalyptus in the coastal region. © 1983 CSIRO. All rights resereved.