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Books

Fam, D., Riedy, C., Palmer, J. & Mitchell, C.A. 2017, Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes, Routledge, UK.
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‘Transdisciplinarity’ is a form of research and practice that synthesises knowledge from a range of academic disciplines and from the community. There is now global interest and a significant body of work on transdisciplinarity and its potential to address the apparently intractable problems of society. This creates the opportunity for a specific focus on its practical application to sustainability issues. Transdisciplinary Research and Practice for Sustainability Outcomes examines the role of transdisciplinarity in the transformations needed for a sustainable world. After an historical overview of transdisciplinarity, Part 1 focuses on tools and frameworks to achieve sustainability outcomes in practice and Part 2 consolidates work by a number of scholars on supporting transdisciplinary researchers and practitioners.Part 3 is a series of case studies including several international examples that demonstrate the challenges and rewards of transdisciplinary work. The concluding chapter proposes a future research pathway for understanding the human factors that underpin successful transdisciplinary research.

Ryan, P. 2017, Action and Reflection Tools for Busy School Leaders, Acer Press.
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This book is a suite of practical action and reflection tools (ART) intended to support professional development and school development.

Chapters

Chong, J. & White, S. 2017, 'Urban—Major Reforms in Urban Water Policy and Management in Major Australian Cities' in Hart, B. & Doolan, J. (eds), Decision Making in Water Resources Policy and Management, Elsevier, pp. 85-96.
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The history of urban water reform in Australia parallels the reform of the water sharing and allocation system. This history is influenced by the origins of Australian water utilities as public sector, often local government, entities. The first major reforms of the 1990s separated the regulatory and operational functions of the water utilities and corporatized many of them, as well as heralded a greater commitment to commercial returns and transparent economic regulation. At the same time, the historic focus on supply planning was being supplemented by supply-demand planning, including some explicit targets for reduction of water use through improved customer water efficiency, reduced losses and increased water recycling. This accelerated during the Millennium drought, which triggered a strong recognition of the impact of climate uncertainty on water security. Large capital works programs for increasing supply ensued, including the building of desalination plants, as well as the first application of “real options” planning in the water sector. In the last 10 years, there has been a growth in alternative servicing options for water supply and sewerage provision, including third-party provision. The future is likely to see the emergence of the smart and digital water utility, resource efficiency and recovery, including of energy and nutrients, as well as a shift to a fourth generation of water infrastructure, including greater “fit for purpose” provision of water services and infrastructure, and a greater variation in models of ownership and service provision.

Chong, J., Treichel, P. & Gero, A. 2017, 'Evaluating climate change adaptation in practice: A child-centred, community-based project in the Philippines' in Uitto, J.I., Puri, J. & van den Berg, R.D. (eds), Evaluating Climate Change Action for Sustainable Development, Springer, Germany, pp. 289-304.
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This authoritative book reviews the evaluation of the development and implementation of climate change strategies.

Cordell, D.J., Metson, G., Iwaniec, D., Bui, T., Childers, D., Dao, N., Dang, H., Davidson, J., Jacobs, B., Kumwenda, S., Morse, T., Nguyen, V., Thole, B. & Tilley, E. 2017, 'Transforming cities: securing food and clean waterways through a transdisciplinary phosphorus approach' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary Research and Practice for Sustainability Outcomes, Routledge, pp. 139-154.

Fam, D., Leimbach, T., Kelly, Hitchens, L. & Callen, L. 2017, 'Meta-considerations for institutionalising Interdisciplinary Education' in Collaborative Research and Collective Learning: Transdisciplinary Theory, Practice and Education, Springer, UK.

Fam, D.M. & Sofoulis, Z. 2017, 'Trouble at the disciplinary divide: a knowledge ecologies analysis of a co-design project with native Alaskan communities' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes, Routledge.

Fam, D.M., Smith, T. & Cordell, D. 2017, 'Being a transdisciplinary researcher: skills and dispositions fostering competence in transdisciplinary research and practice' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes, pp. 77-92.

Jacobs, B., Schweitzer, J., Wallace, L., Dunford, S. & Barns, S. 2017, 'Climate adapted people shelters: A transdisciplinary reimagining of public infrastructure through open, design-led innovation' in Fam, D., Neuhauser, L. & Gibbs, P. (eds), The art of collaborative research and collective learning: Transdisciplinary research, practice & education, Springer.

Mitchell, C., Cordell, D. & Fam, D.M. 2017, 'Beginning at the end: the outcome spaces framework to guide purposive transdisciplinary research' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Reidy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes, pp. 25-38.

Mitchell, C.A. & Ross, K. 2017, 'Trandisciplinarity in action: four guidelines, a reflexive framework and their application to improving community sanitation governance in Indonesia' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary Research and Practice for Sustainability Outcomes, Routledge, pp. 172-189.

Mukheibir, P., Boronyak, L. & Alofa, P. 2017, 'Dynamic adaptive management pathways for drinking water security in Kiribati' in Leal Filho, W. (ed), Climate Change Adaptation in Pacific Countries Fostering Resilience and Improving the Quality of Life, Springer, Berlin, pp. 287-301.
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This book showcases vital lessons learned from research, field projects and best practice examples with regard to climate change adaptation in countries throughout the Pacific region, a part of the planet that is particularly vulnerable to ...

Palmer, J., Riedy, C., Fam, D.M. & Mitchell, C.A. 2017, 'Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes: an introduction' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes, Routledge, UK, pp. 1-6.

Riedy, C.J. 2017, 'Seeding a new transdisciplinary community of practice' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary Research and Practice for Sustainability Outcomes, Routledge.

Willetts, J.R. & Mitchell, C. 2017, 'Assessing transdisciplinary doctoral research: quality criteria and implications for the examination process', Routledge, pp. 122-136.

Williams, J., Fam, D. & Mellick Lopes, A. 2017, 'Creating knowledge: visual communication design research in transdisciplinary projects' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes.

Wynne, L.E., McGee, C. & Lehmann, S. 2017, 'Housing innovation for compact, resilient cities' in Growing Compact Urban Form, Density and Sustainability, Routledge.
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The book presents contributions from internationally well-known scholars, thinkers and practitioners whose theoretical and practical works address city planning, urban and architectural design for density and sustainability at various ...

Journal articles

Carrard, N. & Willetts, J. 2017, 'Environmentally sustainable WASH? Current discourse, planetary boundaries and future directions', Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 209-228.
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The significant challenge of achieving safe, reliable and continuous service delivery has been a focus of the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector in recent years, with less attention given to other important sustainability considerations such as environmental sustainability. The agenda set by the Sustainable Development Goals prompts a wider lens, bringing water resource management and ecosystem conservation together with water and sanitation access targets in one integrated goal. As we grapple with our approach to this new agenda, it is timely to reflect on how we, as a sector, engage with environmental sustainability. This paper reviews recent literature at the intersection of WASH and environmental sustainability to identify current themes and future directions. Analysis of academic and non-academic sources was undertaken and then situated with reference to the planetary boundaries framework as a useful lens to ground the socio-ecological systems and processes upon which environmental sustainability depends. Findings point to both opportunities and gaps within current sector thinking, which can drive leadership from knowledge and research institutions towards better integration of access and environmental sustainability imperatives.

Clift, R., Sim, S., King, H., Chenoweth, J., Christie, I., Clavreul, J., Mueller, C., Posthuma, L., Boulay, A., Chaplin-Kramer, R., Chatterton, J., DeClerck, F., Druckman, A., France, C., Franco, A., Gerten, D., Goedkoop, D., Hauschild, M., Huijbergts, M., Koellner, T., Lambin, E., Lee, J., Mair, S., Marshall, S., McLachlan, S., Canals, L., Mitchell, C., Price, E., Rockstrom, J., Suckling, J. & Murphy, R. 2017, 'The Challenges of Applying Planetary Boundaries as a Basis for Strategic Decision-Making in Companies with Global Supply Chains', Sustainability, vol. 9, no. 2.
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Cvitanovic, C., Cunningham, R., Dowd, A.-.M., Howden, S.M. & van Putten, E.I. 2017, 'Using Social Network Analysis to Monitor and Assess the Effectiveness of Knowledge Brokers at Connecting Scientists and Decision-Makers: An Australian case study', Environmental Policy and Governance, vol. 27, pp. 256-269.
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Despite growing rhetoric regarding the potential benefits of using knowledge brokers in relation to environmental challenges and decision-making processes, the evidence in support of such claims is mostly anecdotal. This is, in part, due to the lack of established methods to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of knowledge brokers. To address this gap we assess the utility of social network analysis (SNA) to evaluate the effectiveness of knowledge brokers in connecting scientists and decision-makers. Specifically, using a case-study approach, we undertake longitudinal SNA over a 12-month period to evaluate the extent to which the knowledge broker developed networks between producers and users of knowledge across different organizations. We also undertook a qualitative survey of scientists (n = 29) who worked in the same organization as the knowledge broker to understand the extent to which the knowledge broker increased the impact of scientific research for decision-making purposes. Results show that the knowledge broker developed an extensive stakeholder network of 192 individuals spanning over 30 organizations. The results of the SNA found that over time this network increased in density and became more cohesive, both key elements underpinning successful knowledge exchange. Furthermore, the qualitative survey found that the knowledge broker also had a positive impact in other ways, including helping researchers understand the operating environments within decision-making agencies and the best approaches for engaging with specific decision-makers. Thus, this study demonstrates the value of SNA for evaluating knowledge brokers and provides empirical support for the use of knowledge brokers in the environmental sector.

De La Sienra Servin, E.E., Smith, T. & Mitchell, C. 2017, 'Worldviews, A Mental Construct Hiding the Potential of Human Behaviour: A New Learning Framework to Guide Education for Sustainable Development', The Journal of Sustainability Education.
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Latest results in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) research and practice show a tendency towards more holistic approaches aiming at deep transformation of the self and the meanings of human existence. Aligned with this, we present the Transdisciplinary Framework of Worldviews and Behaviours (TFWB) to describe the possible formation and expression of a worldview, a complex constellation of meaning and identity from which all human conduct emerges. Four key principles arising from the TFWB are: 1) The whole embodied nervous system is greater than the sum of its separated parts, especially when it comes to intelligence (information processing) and learning (meaning making); 2) The mind is a highly emotion-dependent and mostly unconscious entity; 3) A worldview is a unique arrangement of meaning each person builds, and lives through; and 4) Increasing self-awareness about how a personal worldview is formed and expressed generates increasing opportunities for that individual to explore and build a different meaning for their experience, or to explore and choose different forms to express it (behave). The TFWB informs a new perspective on learning that could be useful for the achievement of ESD’s transformative goals, guiding the innovative design of educational initiatives encouraging new conceptualizations about the meanings of being human; thus, facilitating potential behavioural transformations toward a more sustainable existence.

Esham, M., Jacobs, B., Rosairo, H.S.R. & Siddighi, B.B. 2017, 'Climate change and food security: a Sri Lankan perspective', Environment, Development and Sustainability.
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There is growing concern in Sri Lanka over the impact of climate change, variability and extreme weather events on food production, food security and livelihoods. The link between climate change and food security has been mostly explored in relation to impacts on crop production or food availability aspects of food security, with little focus on other key dimensions, namely food access and food utilization. This review, based on available literature, adopted a food system approach to gain a wider perspective on food security issues in Sri Lanka. It points to several climate-induced issues posing challenges for food security. These issues include declining agriculture productivity, food loss along supply chains, low livelihood resilience of the rural poor and prevalence of high levels of undernourishment and child malnutrition. Our review suggests that achieving food security necessitates action beyond building climate resilient food production systems to a holistic approach that is able to ensure climate resilience of the entire food system while addressing nutritional concerns arising from impacts of climate change. Therefore, there is a pressing need to work towards a climate-smart agriculture system that will address all dimensions of food security. With the exception of productivity of a few crop species, our review demonstrates the dearth of research into climate change impacts on Sri Lanka’s food system. Further research is required to understand how changes in climate may affect other components of the food system including productivity of a wider range of food crops, livestock and fisheries, and shed light on the causal pathways of climate-induced nutritional insecurity.

Fam, D.M. 2017, 'Facilitating communities of practice as social learning systems: a case study of trialling sustainable sanitation at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS)', Knowledge Management Research and Practice, pp. 1-9.
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While social learning is advocated as critical for inducing large-scale shifts toward sustainability, methodological issues associated with designing the opportunities for social learning or guidelines for practitioners seeking to facilitate such learning in cross-disciplinary teams working on sustainability-oriented projects are lacking. This paper draws on a two-year pilot project in Sydney, in which government, industry and academic partners collaborated to learn about the development potential of urine diversion (UD) systems in practice. The concept of ‘Communities of Practice’ was used to identify inherent challenges and opportunities for social learning. An outcome of the project has been the identification of overarching principles for designing opportunities for social learning in such projects, particularly the need (1) to facilitate community-oriented leadership, (2) to develop strategic exercises for collaborative engagement and (3) involvement of actors beyond the boundaries of the experiment to introduce novelty, diversity and cumulative learning opportunities.

Fam, D.M. & Sofoulis, Z. 2017, 'A Knowledge Ecologies analysis of co-designing water and sanitation services in Alaska', Science and Engineering Ethics.
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Willingness to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries is necessary but not sufficient for project success. This is a case study of a transdisciplinary project whose success was constrained by contextual factors that ultimately favoured technical and scientific forms of knowledge over the cultural intelligence that might ensure technical solutions were socially feasible. In response to Alaskan Water and Sewer Challenge (AWSC), an international team with expertise in engineering, consultative design and public health formed in 2013 to collaborate on a two-year project to design remote area water and sanitation systems in consultation with two native Alaskan communities. Team members were later interviewed about their experiences. Project processes are discussed using a 'Knowledge Ecology' framework, which applies principles of ecosystems analysis to knowledge ecologies, identifying the knowledge equivalents of 'biotic' and 'abiotic' factors and looking at their various interactions. In a positivist 'knowledge integration' perspective, different knowledges are like Lego blocks that combine with other 'data sets' to create a unified structure. The knowledge ecology framework highlights how interactions between different knowledges and knowledge practitioners ('biotic factors') are shaped by contextual ('abiotic') factors: the conditions of knowledge production, the research policy and funding climate, the distribution of research resources, and differential access to enabling infrastructures (networks, facilities). This case study highlights the importance of efforts to negotiate between different knowledge frameworks, including by strategic use of language and precepts that help translate social research into technical design outcomes that are grounded in social reality.

Foster, T. 2017, 'A critical mass analysis of community-based financing of water services in rural Kenya', Water Resources and Rural Development.
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Franco-Trigo, L., Hossain, L.N., Durks, D., Fam, D., Inglis, S.C., Benrimoj, S.I. & Sabater-Hernández, D. 2017, 'Stakeholder analysis for the development of a community pharmacy service aimed at preventing cardiovascular disease', Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 539-552.
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Participatory approaches involving stakeholders across the health care system can help enhance the development, implementation and evaluation of health services. These approaches may be particularly useful in planning community pharmacy services and so overcome challenges in their implementation into practice. Conducting a stakeholder analysis is a key first step since it allows relevant stakeholders to be identified, as well as providing planners a better understanding of the complexity of the health care system.The main aim of this study was to conduct a stakeholder analysis to identify those individuals and organizations that could be part of a leading planning group for the development of a community pharmacy service (CPS) to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia.An experienced facilitator conducted a workshop with 8 key informants of the Australian health care system. Two structured activities were undertaken. The first explored current needs and gaps in cardiovascular care and the role of community pharmacists. The second was a stakeholder analysis, using both ex-ante and ad-hoc approaches. Identified stakeholders were then classified into three groups according to their relative influence on the development of the pharmacy service. The information gathered was analyzed using qualitative content analysis.The key informants identified 46 stakeholders, including (1) patient/consumers and their representative organizations, (2) health care providers and their professional organizations and (3) institutions and organizations that do not directly interact with patients but organize and manage the health care system, develop and implement health policies, pay for health care, influence funding for health service research or promote new health initiatives. From the 46 stakeholders, a core group of 12 stakeholders was defined. These were considered crucial to the service's development because they held positions that could drive or inhibit progress. Sec...

Hamilton, T.G.A. & Kelly, S. 2017, 'Low carbon energy scenarios for sub-Saharan Africa: An input-output analysis on the effects of universal energy access and economic growth', Energy Policy, vol. 105, pp. 303-319.
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James, G. 2017, 'A steampunk vision: prosumers and frequency control', AQ - Australian Quarterly, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 22-27.
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The electricity system is created as a giant rotating mass. Hundreds of fast-spinning turbines are elegantly joined together by three-phase electrical currents twisting along the transmission network - Australia has the longest in the world. They are synchronised at 3,000 rpm divided by some number of electrical windings, so that the passing of rotors over stators forms an alternating current at the 50 Hz grid frequency.

Kishita, Y., McLellan, B.C., Giurco, D., Aoki, K., Yoshizawa, G. & Handoh, I.C. 2017, 'Designing backcasting scenarios for resilient energy futures', Technological Forecasting and Social Change.
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© 2017 Elsevier Inc.The concept of resilience is a crucial part in crafting visions of desirable futures designed to withstand the widest variety of external shocks to the system. Backcasting scenarios are widely used to envision desirable futures with a discontinuous change from the present in mind. However, less effort has been devoted to developing theoretical frameworks and methods for building backcasting scenarios with a particular focus on resilience, although resilience has been explored in related sustainability fields. This paper proposes a method that helps design backcasting scenarios for resilient futures. A characteristic of the method is to delineate "collapse" futures, based upon which resilient futures are described to avoid the various collapsed states. In the process of designing backcasting scenarios, fault tree analysis (FTA) is used to support the generation of various risk factors and countermeasures to improve resilience. In order to test the effectiveness of the proposed method, we provide a case study to describe resilient energy systems for a Japanese community to 2030. Four expert workshops involving researchers from different disciplines were organized to generate diversified ideas on resilient energy systems. The results show that three scenarios of collapsed energy systems were described, in which policy options to be taken toward achieving resilient energy systems were derived.

Kohlitz, J.P., Chong, J. & Willetts, J. 2017, 'Climate change vulnerability and resilience of water, sanitation, and hygiene services: a theoretical perspective', Journal of Water Sanitation and Hygiene for Development, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 181-195.
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Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Mukheibir, P. 2017, 'Advancing household water-use feedback to inform customer behaviour for sustainable urban water', Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 198-205.
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© IWA Publishing 2017.Sustainable water management is increasingly essential in an age characterised by rapid population growth, urban and industrial development and climate change. Opportunities to promote conservation and water-use efficiencies remain attractive in directly reducing water demand. Smart water metering and the provision of detailed water-use feedback to consumers present exciting new opportunities for improved urban water management. This paper explores two smart water metering trials in New South Wales, Australia, which provided household water consumption feedback via (i) paper end-use reports and (ii) an online portal. This combination enabled a deeper exploration of the various impacts of detailed feedback enabled via smart water metering. The positive effects uncovered by the research present an important opportunity for smart water metering feedback to contribute towards more sustainable urban water management. Their summary contributes empirical evidence on the impacts for water utilities considering embarking on the smart water metering journey with their customers. The identification of future research and policy needs sets an agenda for smart water metering to promote a sustainable digital urban water future. Larger-scale trials are now required and utilities should integrate the design and plans for scalable advanced feedback programs at the outset of smart meter implementations.

Liu, A., Giurco, D., Mukheibir, P., Mohr, S., Watkins, G. & White, S. 2017, 'Online water-use feedback: household user interest, savings and implications', Urban Water Journal, pp. 1-8.
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Murta, J.C.D., Willetts, J.R.M. & Triwahyudi, W. 2017, 'Sanitation entrepreneurship in rural Indonesia: a closer look', Environment, Development and Sustainability, pp. 1-17.
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© 2016 Springer Science+Business Media DordrechtEnterprises are playing increasing roles in facilitating access to sanitation products and services in Indonesia and other developing economies. This study investigated the factors affecting the sustainability of sanitation enterprises in rural Indonesia. Interviews with 33 organisations representing sanitation enterprises, associations of sanitation enterprises, national and international civil society organisations (CSOs), donor organisations and national and local government agencies were conducted to explore different stakeholder perceptions about enterprise roles. The research revealed factors specific to the sanitation entrepreneurs themselves, such as their skills, entrepreneurial traits, pro-social motivations and intrinsic motivations, as well as factors within their enabling environment. Insufficient customer demand, inadequate capacity building opportunities, lack of financing options for entrepreneurs and their customers, and limited government support were observed to undermine sanitation enterprise success. Industry associations were found to be a useful intermediary support mechanism, particularly in the absence of significant government support for enterprises. However, such associations could also stifle innovation, and their role needs to be carefully developed, including financially sustainable models for such associations. This study has implications for how governments and CSOs in Indonesia and elsewhere might best support the role of enterprises and entrepreneurship towards improved sanitation outcomes.

Plant, R., Boydell, S., Prior, J., Chong, J. & Lederwasch, A. 2017, 'From liability to opportunity: An institutional approach towards value-based land remediation', Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 197-220.
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The remediation of contaminated sites impacts on stakeholders in potentially beneficial ways, yet stakeholder dialogue has historically been focussed on costs, risk, liability, stigma, and other negatives. Shedding light on stakeholders’ remediation values can help reform remediation policy towards more positive outcomes of site clean-up. We adopt institutional theory to elicit plural motivations and cognitive assumptions as embedded in stakeholders’ expressions of remediation values, objectives, and outcomes. We explore in four case studies with varying size, complexity, cultural diversity, and geographical location (three in Australia, one in Fiji) how remediation values operate within remediation decisions. Our findings suggest that more than economic costs, liability, and risks are at play in decision-making on contaminated land. Our research confirmed that different socio-ethical, environmental and sustainability values are evaluated differently by different types of actors (site owners, regulators, auditors, residents, local government, consultants). We found that remediation values often shift in the course of a remediation decision-making process, suggesting learning and improved understanding. Remediation policy that better facilitates and aligns stakeholders’ articulations of initial and emergent outcomes sought from site clean-up is likely to enhance both economic and social value outcomes of remediation. Further research is needed on how remediation policy could better incorporate remediation value dynamics in stakeholder consultation and engagement.

Prior, J. & Rai, T. 2017, 'Engaging with residents' perceived risks and benefits about technologies as a way of resolving remediation dilemmas.', Sci Total Environ, vol. 601-602, pp. 1649-1669.
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In recent decades the diversity of remediation technologies has increased significantly, with the breadth of technologies ranging from dig and dump to emergent technologies like phytoremediation and nanoremediation. The benefits of these technologies to the environment and human health are believed to be substantial. However, they also potentially constitute risks. Whilst there is a growing body of knowledge about the risks and benefits of these technologies from the perspective of experts, little is known about how residents perceive the risks and benefits of the application of these technologies to address contaminants in their local environment. This absence of knowledge poses a challenge to remediation practitioners and policy makers who are increasingly seeking to engage these affected local residents in choosing technology applications. Building on broader research into the perceived benefits and risks of technologies, and data from a telephone survey of 2009 residents living near 13 contaminated sites in Australia, regression analysis of closed-ended survey questions and coding of open-ended questions are combined to identify the main predictors of resident's perceived levels of risk and benefit to resident's health and to their local environment from remediation technologies. This research identifies a range of factors associated with the residents' physical context, their engagement with institutions during remediation processes, and the technologies which are associated with residents' level of perceived risk and benefit for human health and the local environment. The analysis found that bioremediation technologies were perceived as less risky and more beneficial than chemical, thermal and physical technologies. The paper also supports broader technology research that reports an inverse correlation between levels of perceived risks and benefits. In addition, the paper reveals the types of risks and benefits to human health and the local environment that...

Prior, J., Hubbard, P. & Rai, T. 2017, 'Using residents' worries about technology as a way of resolving environmental remediation dilemmas', Science of The Total Environment, vol. 580, pp. 882-899.
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The choice of technologies used to remediate contaminated environments are increasingly made via engagement with affected local residents. Despite this, little is known about how residents perceive remediation technology applications. Building on the findings of broader technology worry research, and drawing on data from a telephone survey of 2009 residents living near thirteen contaminated sites in Australia, regression analysis of closed-ended survey questions and coding analysis of open-ended survey questions are combined to identify the main predictors of worries concerning particular remediation technologies, and how worry affects them. This suggests respondents are more worried about the application of chemical remediation technologies than the application of physical and thermal technologies, which in turn caused more worry than the application of biotechnology. The paper suggests that these worries can be reduced via direct engagement with residents about remediation technologies, suggesting that such engagement can provide knowledge that improves remediation technology decisions.

Pritchard, R. & Kelly 2017, 'Energy efficiency in non-domestic building performance evaluation: lessons learnt from early stage implementation in Cambridge', Sustainability.

Sahin, O., Stewart, R.A., Giurco, D. & Porter, M.G. 2017, 'Renewable hydropower generation as a co-benefit of balanced urban water portfolio management and flood risk mitigation', Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, vol. 68, no. 2, pp. 1076-1087.
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© 2016 Elsevier Ltd.Understanding energy-water system interactions is critical to the effective management of urban infrastructure. This paper explores the potential for hydropower as a co-benefit in a novel operating regime for Sydney's main water reservoir (Warragamba Dam). Hydropower could be generated as part of storage level management in the reservoir aimed at introducing flood retention 'airspace' (to mitigate downstream flood risk from extreme rainfall) whilst augmenting the use of installed desalination capacity to maintain secure supplies of water. A purpose-built systems dynamics model provides the mechanism for evaluating and comparing future operating scenarios over a 25 year period (i.e. until 2040). Importantly, the findings reveal the potential for desalination plants, integrated into a populous city's water supply network, to satisfy a much broader planning agenda. Specifically, the study provides evidence that Sydney's interdependent goals of deferring capital intensive flood storage works, maintaining water security, better utilising existing desalination and hydropower assets, and increasing renewable energy generation can be achieved through applying systems thinking to a complex citywide water planning problem. The work also makes a valuable contribution to the energy-water nexus literature at the under-explored city-scale.

Thacker, S., Kelly, Pant, R. & Hall, J. 2017, 'Evaluating the benefits of adaptation of critical infrastructure to hydrometeorological risks', Risk Analysis.

Tiziano, D. & Kelly 2017, 'Are we in deep water? Water scarcity and its limits to economic growth', Ecological Economics, vol. 142, pp. 130-147.
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Water is an important factor of production contributing both directly and indirectly to economic activity across all sectors and regions of the global economy. Water scarcity may therefore go beyond having important consequences for people, society and ecological systems but may also pose a threat to economic growth. Using the latest IPCC RCP projections and the OECD Shared Socio-Economic Pathways (SSPs) for population growth and economic output, we develop a multi-regional input-output model to estimate future demand for water resources across different countries and sectors of the global economy. Model results show that most countries will experience declining water availability, particularly those countries that experience a confluence of factors including low fresh water availability, high climate change impacts, and growing consumption patterns. We show that virtual water trade and improved water efficiency has potential to alleviate the worst effects of water scarcity for wealthy countries but may have limited effect on poorer countries. The analysis concludes that the most important driver of future water scarcity is economic growth, which overwhelms any realistic savings that can be made from increased technological progress and improvements to water efficiency. Population growth and climate change are also shown to be important drivers of future water scarcity, particularly over the long-run.

Watson, R., Mukheibir, P. & Mitchell, C. 2017, 'Local recycled water in Sydney: A policy and regulatory tug-of-war', Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 148, pp. 583-594.
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Conferences

Crosby, A., Fam, D.M. & Abby Mellick Lopes 2016, 'Wealth from Waste: a transdisciplinary approach to design education', Open Design for E-very-thing – exploring new design purposes, Hong Kong.
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Fam, D.M., Crosby, A. & Mellick Lopes, A. 2017, 'Touching the system: everyday practices implicated in creating a new economy for food waste management', 9th International Social Innovation Research Conference (ISIRC), Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.

Fam, D.M., Leimbach, T., Kelly, S., Hitchens, L. & Callen, M. 2017, 'Collaborative research and collective learning: institutionalizing interdisciplinary programs in higher education', International Transdisciplinary Conference, Transdisciplinary Research and Education — Intercultural Endeavours, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Germany.

Fam, D.M., Mitchell, C., Ross, K. & Ukowitz, M. 2017, 'Challenging my and your worldview - recognizing ontological (beliefs), epistemological (knowledge) and axiological (values) assumptions to enrich TD research and practice', International Transdisciplinary Conference, Transdisciplinary Research and Education — Intercultural Endeavours, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Germany.

Gough, C., Cunningham, R. & Mander, S. 2016, 'Societal responses to CO2 storage in the UK: media, stakeholder and public perspectives', 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, Lausanne, Switzerland.
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Watson, R., Mukheibir & Mitchell, C. 2017, 'Local recycled water in Sydney: what's happening and why', OzWater'17, Sydney.
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Yu, C., Xue, Y., James, G. & Xue, F. 2017, 'Impacts of large scale wind power on power system transient stability', 4th International Conference on Electric Utility Deregulation and Restructuring and Power Technologies (DRPT 2011),, Shandong.
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Reports

Alexander, D., Wyndham, J., James, G. & McIntosh, L. 2017, Networks Renewed: Technical Analysis.

Baguma, A., Bizoza, A., Carter, R., Cavill, S., Foster, S., Foster, T., Jobbins, G., Hope, R., Katuva, J., Koehler, J., Shepherd, A. & Simons, A. 2017, Groundwater and poverty in sub Saharan Africa a short investigation highlighting outstanding knowledge gaps, pp. 1-105.
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Dunstan, C., Alexander, D., Morris, T., Langham, E. & Jazbec, M. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2017, Demand Management Incentives Review: Creating a level playing field for network DM in the National Electricity Market, pp. 1-57.
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This review assesses and quantifies the financial barriers to DM created by existing economic regulatory incentives for distribution network businesses. the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) commissioned ISF to conduct the review to support the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) in developing the new DM Incentive Scheme required by a change to the National Electricity Rules in 2015.

Fam, D.M., Turner, A., Latimer, G., Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Starr, P. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2017, Convergence of the waste and water sectors: risks, opportunities and future trends – discussion paper, pp. 1-24, Sydney, Australia.
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The aim of this discussion paper is to bring to light the increasing convergence of the water and waste sectors and the associated risks, benefits, and future trends already on the horizon. Current examples of convergence in managing coal seam gas (CSG), food waste, fats, oils and grease (FOG) and biosolids, provide insights into not only the risks to public and environmental health of waste streams that cross sectoral boundaries but also potential opportunities for the water and waste sectors to seize as business opportunities. What is clear is that convergence between these sectors is already happening and in some cases there are adverse environmental consequences and associated health impacts. A key message from this research is the need to take an integrated and coordinated approach to planning and regulating the convergence of the water and waste sectors. Key recommendations to manage the risks associated with cross sector convergence of the water and waste sectors include facilitating: (1) increased engagement between regulators of each sector, (2) greater communication across sectors (3) a co-ordinated approach and plan to managing waste streams, (4) the development of monitoring and evaluation frameworks that cross sectors and (5) a coordinated approach to the assessment of research needs.

Liu, A., Turner, A.J. & White, S. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2017, Assessment of Future Water Efficiency Measures, pp. 1-85, Sydney, Australia.
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The Victorian water utilities have been active in the implementation of water efficiency for many years. Similar to other jurisdictions this intensified during the Millennium drought. The approaches employed during the drought involved both individual and joint water utility initiatives, often in collaboration with the Victorian government. These initiatives covered both the residential and non-residential sectors and were supported by the important collaborative research initiated in 2003 under the $50m Smart Water Fund (now closed). This research report “Assessment of Future Water Efficiency Measures” has been developed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), University of Technology Sydney, on behalf of the three Melbourne retailers, Melbourne Water, Barwon Water and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning. The rapid study does not aim to be exhaustive but to begin to gather information to assist in taking stock of the current efficiency situation and to look on the horizon in terms of how efficiency might change. It aims to gather information that will be useful to assist in testing alternative potential scenarios of long term demand forecasts and new potential short and long term efficiency program opportunities that can be actioned when deemed appropriate into the future. There is significant additional conservation potential available as we look to the future in terms of new more efficient appliances and ways to interact with customers by tapping into new technical and behavioural opportunities.

Mella, S., James, G. & Chalmers, K. 2017, Evaluating the potential to export Pilbara solar resources to the proposed ASEAN grid via a subsea high voltage direct current interconnector.

Riedy, C.J. & Kent, J. 2017, Systemic Impacts of Mini-publics, pp. 1-133.
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This research project asks what mini-publics contribute to democracy from a systemic perspective, and how that contribution might be strengthened. For evidence, we draw on three mini-publics supported by the newDemocracy Foundation during 2015 and 2016: the Penrith Community Panel; the Noosa Community Jury (on management of the Noosa River); and Infrastructure Victoria’s citizen juries.

Riedy, C.J., Wynne, L., McKenna, K. & Daly, M. 2017, Advancing co-housing for seniors, pp. 1-35.
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Riedy, C.J., Wynne, L., McKenna, K. & Daly, M. 2017, Cohousing for Seniors: Literature Review, pp. 1-35.
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Rutovitz, J., James, G., Teske, S., Mpofu, S., Usher, J., Morris, T. & Alexander, D. 2017, Storage requirements for reliable electricity in Australia.

Teske, S., Lins, C., Hullin, M., Williamson, L.E. & Fattal, A. REN21 2017, Renewables Global Futures Report: Great Debates Towards 100 % Renewable Energy, pp. 1-98, Paris.
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Turner, A.J. & White, S. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2017, Urban Water Futures: Trends and Potential Disruptions, pp. 1-49, Sydney, Australia.
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Now an ideal time to reflect, to take stock of where the Australian water industry is at, to scan the trends, disruptions and innovation opportunities that lie ahead, to imagine what the water industry could look like in the next 20 to 30 years, and to work out what it would take to realise that vision. As the weight of history, the push of the present and the pull of the future unfold, there is a need to take control, innovate, advocate and consciously head in the desired direction to ensure that the collective vision of the future water industry is fulfilled. The Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA), the peak industry body that represents over 70 public and privately, owned water or water related organisations, commissioned the Institute to research and write this discussion paper on the trends and potential disruptions to Australia’s urban water futures.