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Publications

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Chapters

Fam, D.M. & Sofoulis, Z. 2017, 'Trouble at the disciplinary divide: a knowledge ecologies analysis of a co-design project with native Alaskan communities' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes, Routledge.

Mukheibir, P., Boronyak, L. & Alofa, P. 2017, 'Dynamic adaptive management pathways for drinking water security in Kiribati' in Leal Filho, W. (ed), Climate Change Adaptation in Pacific Countries Fostering Resilience and Improving the Quality of Life, Springer, Berlin, pp. 287-301.
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This book showcases vital lessons learned from research, field projects and best practice examples with regard to climate change adaptation in countries throughout the Pacific region, a part of the planet that is particularly vulnerable to ...

Palmer, J., Riedy, C., Fam, D.M. & Mitchell, C.A. 2017, 'Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes: an introduction' in Fam, D., Palmer, J., Riedy, C. & Mitchell, C. (eds), Transdisciplinary research and practice for sustainability outcomes, Routledge, UK, pp. 1-6.

Journal articles

Ali, S.H., Giurco, D., Arndt, N., Nickless, E., Brown, G., Demetriades, A., Durrheim, R., Enriquez, M.A., Kinnaird, J., Littleboy, A., Meinert, L.D., Oberhänsli, R., Salem, J., Schodde, R., Schneider, G., Vidal, O. & Yakovleva, N. 2017, 'Mineral supply for sustainable development requires resource governance', Nature, vol. 543, no. 7645, pp. 367-372.
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Clift, R., Sim, S., King, H., Chenoweth, J., Christie, I., Clavreul, J., Mueller, C., Posthuma, L., Boulay, A., Chaplin-Kramer, R., Chatterton, J., DeClerck, F., Druckman, A., France, C., Franco, A., Gerten, D., Goedkoop, D., Hauschild, M., Huijbergts, M., Koellner, T., Lambin, E., Lee, J., Mair, S., Marshall, S., McLachlan, S., Canals, L., Mitchell, C., Price, E., Rockstrom, J., Suckling, J. & Murphy, R. 2017, 'The Challenges of Applying Planetary Boundaries as a Basis for Strategic Decision-Making in Companies with Global Supply Chains', Sustainability, vol. 9, no. 2.
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Cvitanovic, C., Cunningham, R., Dowd, A.-.M., Howden, S.M. & van Putten, E.I. 2017, 'Using Social Network Analysis to Monitor and Assess the Effectiveness of Knowledge Brokers at Connecting Scientists and Decision-Makers: An Australian case study', Environmental Policy and Governance.
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Despite growing rhetoric regarding the potential benefits of using knowledge brokers in relation to environmental challenges and decision-making processes, the evidence in support of such claims is mostly anecdotal. This is, in part, due to the lack of established methods to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of knowledge brokers. To address this gap we assess the utility of social network analysis (SNA) to evaluate the effectiveness of knowledge brokers in connecting scientists and decision-makers. Specifically, using a case-study approach, we undertake longitudinal SNA over a 12-month period to evaluate the extent to which the knowledge broker developed networks between producers and users of knowledge across different organizations. We also undertook a qualitative survey of scientists (n = 29) who worked in the same organization as the knowledge broker to understand the extent to which the knowledge broker increased the impact of scientific research for decision-making purposes. Results show that the knowledge broker developed an extensive stakeholder network of 192 individuals spanning over 30 organizations. The results of the SNA found that over time this network increased in density and became more cohesive, both key elements underpinning successful knowledge exchange. Furthermore, the qualitative survey found that the knowledge broker also had a positive impact in other ways, including helping researchers understand the operating environments within decision-making agencies and the best approaches for engaging with specific decision-makers. Thus, this study demonstrates the value of SNA for evaluating knowledge brokers and provides empirical support for the use of knowledge brokers in the environmental sector.

Kishita, Y., McLellan, B.C., Giurco, D., Aoki, K., Yoshizawa, G. & Handoh, I.C. 2017, 'Designing backcasting scenarios for resilient energy futures', Technological Forecasting and Social Change.
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© 2017 Elsevier Inc.The concept of resilience is a crucial part in crafting visions of desirable futures designed to withstand the widest variety of external shocks to the system. Backcasting scenarios are widely used to envision desirable futures with a discontinuous change from the present in mind. However, less effort has been devoted to developing theoretical frameworks and methods for building backcasting scenarios with a particular focus on resilience, although resilience has been explored in related sustainability fields. This paper proposes a method that helps design backcasting scenarios for resilient futures. A characteristic of the method is to delineate "collapse" futures, based upon which resilient futures are described to avoid the various collapsed states. In the process of designing backcasting scenarios, fault tree analysis (FTA) is used to support the generation of various risk factors and countermeasures to improve resilience. In order to test the effectiveness of the proposed method, we provide a case study to describe resilient energy systems for a Japanese community to 2030. Four expert workshops involving researchers from different disciplines were organized to generate diversified ideas on resilient energy systems. The results show that three scenarios of collapsed energy systems were described, in which policy options to be taken toward achieving resilient energy systems were derived.

Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Mukheibir, P. 2017, 'Advancing household water-use feedback to inform customer behaviour for sustainable urban water', Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 198-205.
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© IWA Publishing 2017.Sustainable water management is increasingly essential in an age characterised by rapid population growth, urban and industrial development and climate change. Opportunities to promote conservation and water-use efficiencies remain attractive in directly reducing water demand. Smart water metering and the provision of detailed water-use feedback to consumers present exciting new opportunities for improved urban water management. This paper explores two smart water metering trials in New South Wales, Australia, which provided household water consumption feedback via (i) paper end-use reports and (ii) an online portal. This combination enabled a deeper exploration of the various impacts of detailed feedback enabled via smart water metering. The positive effects uncovered by the research present an important opportunity for smart water metering feedback to contribute towards more sustainable urban water management. Their summary contributes empirical evidence on the impacts for water utilities considering embarking on the smart water metering journey with their customers. The identification of future research and policy needs sets an agenda for smart water metering to promote a sustainable digital urban water future. Larger-scale trials are now required and utilities should integrate the design and plans for scalable advanced feedback programs at the outset of smart meter implementations.

Liu, A., Giurco, D., Mukheibir, P., Mohr, S., Watkins, G. & White, S. 2017, 'Online water-use feedback: household user interest, savings and implications', Urban Water Journal, pp. 1-8.
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© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis paper reports on the short- and long-term impacts of online water-use feedback provided via a smart metering trial involving 120 households in New South Wales, Australia. Near-real time water consumption feedback was provided via an online portal to half of the sample. Water consumption was uniquely analysed one year pre- and post-intervention, and in conjunction with login data. During one year of available access, the intervention group saved an overall average of 24.1 litres per household per day (L/hh/d) (4.2%). Regression analysis showed the significant savings of active users related specifically to portal login activity. Significant short-term effects persisted for 42 days, averaging at 63.1 L/hh/d. The article discusses the implications for research and practice, including a consideration of how, in addition to providing ongoing access, online portals could be leveraged further by water authorities to help meet urgent short-term supply constraints such as in drought.

Watson, R., Mukheibir, P. & Mitchell, C. 2017, 'Local recycled water in Sydney: A policy and regulatory tug-of-war', Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 148, pp. 583-594.
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Reports

Alexander, D., Wyndham, J., James, G. & McIntosh, L. 2017, Networks Renewed: Technical Analysis.

Turner, A.J. & White, S. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2017, Urban Water Futures: Trends and Potential Disruptions, pp. 1-49, Sydney, Australia.
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Now an ideal time to reflect, to take stock of where the Australian water industry is at, to scan the trends, disruptions and innovation opportunities that lie ahead, to imagine what the water industry could look like in the next 20 to 30 years, and to work out what it would take to realise that vision. As the weight of history, the push of the present and the pull of the future unfold, there is a need to take control, innovate, advocate and consciously head in the desired direction to ensure that the collective vision of the future water industry is fulfilled. The Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA), the peak industry body that represents over 70 public and privately, owned water or water related organisations, commissioned the Institute to research and write this discussion paper on the trends and potential disruptions to Australia’s urban water futures.