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On-campus clinical labs give students a taste of the real thing

UTS Nursing, Midwifery and Health clinical labs, photos by Claire Sargent

In summary:

  • UTS Nursing, Midwifery and Health students will be put through their clinical paces in seven new clinical practice laboratories that look and feel exactly like the real thing, five of which are complete with robotic simulator mannequins.
  • UTS is leading the sector in providing realistic learning environments.

UTS Nursing, Midwifery and Health students will be put through their clinical paces in seven new clinical practice laboratories that look and feel exactly like the real thing, five of which are complete with robotic simulator mannequins.

More than 1500 students will use the new facilities and take advantage of the latest technology. Students are filmed in acute care and birthing suite environments, via cameras and one way mirrors, to capture their performance before it being played back on the big screen for debriefing.

UTS Dean of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Professor John Daly said the new facilities were an example of practice oriented learning and crucial to preparing career-ready graduates.

"UTS is leading the sector in providing realistic learning environments. Nursing and midwifery are professions with immense responsibility and it’s vital that our students have every opportunity to practice their full range of skills in real life situations before they meet the public," Professor Daly said.

 

The new labs were made possible by a $2.4M Federal Government grant, matched by UTS, to deliver a range of new facilities for the faculty under the University's $1 billion City Campus Master Plan.

Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) Dr Joanne Gray said the clinical practice laboratories were designed to help students apply their knowledge as they learn. Simulations involve a combination of skills and as a result enhance students' clinical judgement, improve confidence and enhance practical learning in preparation for professional work.

"Using simulation learning strategies, students can actively participate in authentic care scenarios. Students comment that simulations make them 'think on their feet', as they're exposed to the roles and responsibilities of registered nurses and midwives," Dr Gray said.

"The advanced patient simulator manikins – with realistic anatomical features such as complex airway systems, rising and falling chests, and heart and lung sounds – take teaching and learning to another level. They inspire immersion and actually quite a lot of creativity in the students and lecturers too."

The upgrade also provides greater flexibility in these spaces and they can accommodate a number of different formats, break out areas for staff and students, meeting rooms, offices and amenities and open study spaces complete with computers.

UTS City Campus Master Plan is a vision to deliver a world-leading campus that will change the face of education at UTS, embodying the UTS model of learning and industry-focused research.

See information about the new Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health facilities

See the Sydney Morning Herald story that features the new labs along with action video

See information about the UTS City Campus Master Plan

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